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Dog Holes v T-Track v Vise for side of table

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Forum topic by JosephNY posted 01-29-2018 08:35 PM 486 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JosephNY

37 posts in 2190 days


01-29-2018 08:35 PM

I’m a total newbie and excited to be building a work table.

I had a 4×8 sheet of 3/4” MDO CNC’d with 20mm holes and am designing the base.

I see great tables with the sides made with dog holes, t-tracks and vises.

In addition to lots of other types of work for this table, I envision it also being a place for slabs to be routered flat so I need a way to temporarily secure (at varying heights) side rails to support a router jig.

Here’s what I have so far.

Any suggestions on design and holes v track v a vise for the side would be appreciates.


11 replies so far

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JosephNY

37 posts in 2190 days


#1 posted 02-01-2018 05:10 PM

Maybe my question was too difficult to answer because of my lack of understanding of the options, choices and analysis of worktable builds.

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Vindex

91 posts in 845 days


#2 posted 02-01-2018 09:09 PM

edit: Nevermind, I got what you were saying the second time I read your post. Unfortunately, I’ve never used a router jig in that way, so I can’t offer any advice on that issue.

I use a face vise and dog holes on the front of the bench for securing work, but I don’t know how well that setup would work with a router jig. Are you planing to use the front of the bench for other applications as well?

This article might be helpful as it provides a good overview of the major considerations for workbench design: https://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/rulesforworkbenches

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MrRon

4793 posts in 3266 days


#3 posted 02-01-2018 11:27 PM

First off, I would make the frame from 2×6’s because of the 8’ between supports and allow the top to overhang the frame by an 1-1/2”. I would also double up with the thickness of the top to 1-1/2” thick. For legs, 2×4’s, arranged to form a 5×5 square leg (made up of 4- 2×4’s). 2×4’s can be used for intermediate top bracing. The bench will be heavy and that’s what you want to keep it from moving when planing. Tailor the height of the bench to suit your height. 36” is a standard height, but it should suit your height and the work you will be doing.

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JosephNY

37 posts in 2190 days


#4 posted 02-02-2018 12:39 PM

Thank you both very much for your help!

I have lots of rough sawn lumber wider than my 13” planer, so I’ve been dreaming of making a router-planer jig-sled for a while. Looking at so many designs online. The piece rests on a support top and the router sits in a sled that is supported above the workpiece by rails running lengthwise with the piece. It’s those rails that I’m still figuring out how to set in place on this table. I was thinking of putting in permanent dogs (20mm dowels) enbedded in 4×4. My thinking is that it will just sit in place.

I would like to be able to use the sides and front of the table, but that’s pretty much as far as I got.

The top frame will be 2×6 and the intermediate bracing 2×4—thank you.

I was planning to use 4×4 for legs (I could also use 6×6). I don’t know how to make 5×5 legs out of 2×4’s.

I’d also like to put retractable wheels (on this heavy table).

I already have the 3/4” MDO CNC’d with 20MM holes. I was wondering what the effective difference would be between 3/4” MDO and a 2” (or greater) traditional worktable top.

Thank you again!

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MrRon

4793 posts in 3266 days


#5 posted 02-02-2018 07:57 PM

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Gene Howe

10524 posts in 3452 days


#6 posted 02-02-2018 08:22 PM

Re: the router planer. The Wood Whisperer has a YouTube video about router planing a bench flat. His methods would be how you might set up a planing jig for your bench. Bear in mind, his rails were attached for a one time use. If yours are to be more or less permanent, consider making their heights adjustable #1 for different thicknesses and, #2 because they will undoubtedly get out of level at some time.
I’m planning a similar build and pondering how to make the rails detachable. It’s for certain that the rails will need to be leveled between every use.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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JosephNY

37 posts in 2190 days


#7 posted 02-02-2018 08:36 PM



- MrRon

Aha! I was trying to figure it out with leaving a space int he middle and without ripping them.

Thank you!

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JosephNY

37 posts in 2190 days


#8 posted 02-02-2018 08:41 PM



Re: the router planer. The Wood Whisperer has a YouTube video about router planing a bench flat. His methods would be how you might set up a planing jig for your bench. Bear in mind, his rails were attached for a one time use. If yours are to be more or less permanent, consider making their heights adjustable #1 for different thicknesses and, #2 because they will undoubtedly get out of level at some time.
I m planning a similar build and pondering how to make the rails detachable. It s for certain that the rails will need to be leveled between every use.

- Gene Howe

WW is super cool!

I was thinking about making a straight 4×4 and permanently installing a few dogs (dowels) in and dropping the 4×4s in place when I needed rails.

This doesn’t solve the height adjustment or the leveling. Open to suggestions. Here’s what I mean:

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Gene Howe

10524 posts in 3452 days


#9 posted 02-02-2018 09:18 PM


Re: the router planer. The Wood Whisperer has a YouTube video about router planing a bench flat. His methods would be how you might set up a planing jig for your bench. Bear in mind, his rails were attached for a one time use. If yours are to be more or less permanent, consider making their heights adjustable #1 for different thicknesses and, #2 because they will undoubtedly get out of level at some time.
I m planning a similar build and pondering how to make the rails detachable. It s for certain that the rails will need to be leveled between every use.

- Gene Howe

WW is super cool!

I was thinking about making a straight 4×4 and permanently installing a few dogs (dowels) in and dropping the 4×4s in place when I needed rails.

This doesn t solve the height adjustment or the leveling. Open to suggestions. Here s what I mean:

- JosephNY


That makes sense. Hadn’t thought of that. Thanks.
Then, if the got un level, shims would work.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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JosephNY

37 posts in 2190 days


#10 posted 02-02-2018 09:31 PM

I was thinking shims also, but they might come loose.

The other thought I had was a track across the side with clamps to hold a 2×6 or 2×8 at exactly the right height for the thickness of the workpiece and to make it level.

Like this:

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Gene Howe

10524 posts in 3452 days


#11 posted 02-02-2018 10:34 PM

I like the dogs better. I’ve got 6’ of clear edge space and can’t imagine needing more for planing. So, if shims were necessary, clamping the ends wouldn’t interfere. OTOH, a ledge could be glued/screwed to the outside bottoms of the rails to provide for clamping. That would work if shims were necessary. In fact, it could make the dogs unnecessary.
Glad you started this. Talking about it clarifies my thinking.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

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