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What to use over Danish Oil

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Forum topic by Manitario posted 03-31-2011 09:59 PM 12608 views 1 time favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Manitario

2378 posts in 1627 days


03-31-2011 09:59 PM

Sorry for the silly question; I’m staining some railings with Danish oil, and I want to put a final coat of something that will be a bit more durable than the D. oil itself; what would you recommend? Would a clear wipe-on poly work over the D. oil?
Thanks!

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil


20 replies so far

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2566 days


#1 posted 03-31-2011 11:01 PM

Rob, wipe-on poly will work just fine. Be sure to give the Danish oil time to cure. I would wait several days- depending on your shop temperature- before applying the polyurethane.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3592 posts in 1938 days


#2 posted 04-01-2011 01:23 AM

Rob,

Scott is absolutly right about the wipe-on poly over Danish oil.. I agree with that whole-heartly. A couple of months back I built an entertainment center (you can see it in my projects) for some folks. I put on 2 coats of d.o., let them cure for several days in between coats, and then 3 coats of Watco Wipe-on Ploy, buffing in between coats with 0000 steel wool, and then the final coat of poly. Turned out pretty nice. Try it…...Rick.

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1114 posts in 1804 days


#3 posted 04-01-2011 02:15 AM

Danish oil itself already carries polyurethane, linseed oil, and mineral spirits.
I never understood why people want to top coat it with polyurethane.

View Steven H's profile

Steven H

1114 posts in 1804 days


#4 posted 04-01-2011 02:15 AM

If you want to top coat, let it dry 5-7 days.

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2378 posts in 1627 days


#5 posted 04-02-2011 05:06 AM

wipe-on poly it is! Thanks guys!

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1594 days


#6 posted 04-02-2011 06:28 AM

There is no silly (or stupid) question, Manitario.

Steven, I agree with you on the makeup of DO, but one might want to go to poly, or natural (say, Watco) if you’re using a toned one and have reached the character that you want.

Watco, applied per instructions, as many coats as you want, builds beautifully.

And Rick, thanks, in your explanation. for not saying “between each coat.” It’s impossible to do anything between one thing. “Between coats” or “After each coat” is correct. “Between each coat”, sometimes seen immortalized on coating labels, should send the writer back to sixth grade.

There. I feel so much better. I’ll sleep tonight, while Manitario’s DO is a-drying.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View rlrjr's profile

rlrjr

65 posts in 1583 days


#7 posted 04-03-2011 03:46 AM

Hey all. I’m using some Hornsbys’ Danish Tung oil (Glossy) oil on some small boxes I’m making out of white wood and pine. Two questions: 1) Is Watco better than Hornsby and 2) exactly what kind of wood is “white wood”? It’s sold at both big box stores in my area.

Thanks, Rick

-- When I works, I works hard. When I sits, I sits loose. And when I thinks I falls asleep.--

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2378 posts in 1627 days


#8 posted 04-03-2011 03:51 AM

hmmm, good questions; I’ve never used Hornsby’s d.o. As for “white wood” I’ve had the same question, personally I think it is code for “paint it because it has no grain”

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View MinnesotaMike's profile

MinnesotaMike

28 posts in 1384 days


#9 posted 04-03-2011 04:04 AM

Actually, I think the “white wood” is likely aspen. Haven’t worked any yet. Saw some at Fleet Farm this afternoon. Very white and virtually no visable grain – almost looks like basswood, but appears to be harder though very definately a softwood. Might be fun to use for playing with some multi-color dye finish. I think it was priced at about $2.50/bdft

View rlrjr's profile

rlrjr

65 posts in 1583 days


#10 posted 04-03-2011 04:17 AM

Yep. I’ve got a can of Watco DO with dark walnut dye in it. I’m going to try it on some white wood and see how it does. On another note; do any of you fellas try to sell things at local flea markets?

Thanks, Rick

-- When I works, I works hard. When I sits, I sits loose. And when I thinks I falls asleep.--

View spamfilterman's profile

spamfilterman

147 posts in 1766 days


#11 posted 04-05-2011 04:12 AM

Hello. I used Arm-r-seal on top of Watco Oil on my tv stand: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/36956
It worked ok.

View pjones46's profile

pjones46

235 posts in 1387 days


#12 posted 12-29-2011 08:00 AM

Sent an email to Watco tech service and below is their reply:

“Thank you for your recent e-mail. The only clear coat that can be applied over the Danish Oil is an oil based polyurethane. After 72 hours of applying the Danish Oil, any oil based polyurethane can be applied.”

-- God is great, the Beer is good and people are Crazy. www.pauljoneswoodworks.com

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1208 posts in 1220 days


#13 posted 12-29-2011 03:08 PM

That is the way I do it with walnut. Apply danish oil to bring out the grain and figure. Let thoroughly dry. Buff with 0000 steel wool. Apply satin poly with a foam brush. Let dry, and buff with 0000 steel wool. Apply final coat or more if you like. More is not always better with poly. This gives a very pretty and durable finish.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT15 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1437 days


#14 posted 12-29-2011 03:09 PM

Another vote for wipe-on poly. My purpleheart humidor is about 10 years old and it’s poly over danish oil. The finish is as good as when I placed it.

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View EPJartisan's profile

EPJartisan

1093 posts in 1869 days


#15 posted 12-30-2011 09:15 AM

I also agree with a wipe on Poly… why? Because after 8 years of working with black cherry in my whole condo, I discovered that Watco danish oil.. my oil of choice.. though it builds to a nice finish… living in Chicago (or the midwest) with the humidity and temp changes… Danish oil (even up to 8 coats) with no top coat has not held up to the changes and can either dry out or fade in “depth” which is the real reason to use oil in the first place. Seems Danish Oil offers little protection from direct moisture as well. I have come to refinish most of my black cherry with a naphtha/danish oil/beeswax (for trim) .... OR a few coats of wipe on Poly for high use areas. The poly just seems to last longer and without hand oil buildup, which can turn the finish grey. Just my thoughts on why top coat over danish oil. :)

-- " 'Truth' is like a beautiful flower, unique to each plant and to the season it blossoms ... 'Fact' is the root and leaf, allowing the plant grow and bloom again."

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