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Delta 46-701

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Forum topic by thimmaker posted 01-28-2018 03:27 AM 660 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thimmaker

17 posts in 149 days


01-28-2018 03:27 AM

Anybody using an old Delta 46-701? and do you have any problems with it?

-- thimmaker


10 replies so far

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2322 posts in 2162 days


#1 posted 01-28-2018 01:55 PM

Still have a Delta 46-700 and did have trouble with the reeves drive so had it converted to move the belt over pulleys to change speeds. Still have it sitting on floor at back of my shop haven’t used it in years but still works.

-- Bill

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thimmaker

17 posts in 149 days


#2 posted 01-28-2018 03:56 PM

I started using the lathe last May after it sat in a basement for at least 25 years. Took then reeves drive apart and greased the sliding parts which seem to be the one area that can start having problems but if everything moves easily I can’t see where it should have problems? Its a simple drive that was used on 5 HP minibikes for a lot of years.I think it works great other than not having a slow enough low speed. Mine checks out at about 465 rpm slow and about 1800 at high. Probably needs a new belt by now.
Geo.

-- thimmaker

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lew

12102 posts in 3783 days


#3 posted 01-29-2018 03:31 PM

Mine works fine. Keep the split pulley shaft clean and lubed.

I replaced the belt with one I got locally- not the exact size but it works fine. I wish the speed could be adjusted to a lower RPM and it’s a little noisy but…

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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Wildwood

2322 posts in 2162 days


#4 posted 01-29-2018 09:45 PM

That Delta 46-700 series lathe either worked or it didn’t. Know it worked for Norm that’s why bought it! My hat is off to anyone that can fix an Asian reeves drive!

Had two factory repairmen look at my 46-700 and they could not get it to work. One was a machinist and the other more into electrical repairs. This lathe broke down in less than thirty days of ownership, found out some time later could requested a refund from the factory.

Took my lathe to welding & machine shop and had him add a grooved pulley wheel to my spindle and bought a new one for my motor. He mounted a bracket to the bed with swing arm so could swing motor in to loosen tbe belt to change speeds. Lost the headstock cover and speed changing lever but didn’t need it. Replaced it with my current lathe and will never buy another Asian reeves drive lathe mounted on the headstock!

-- Bill

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Pete_LJ

99 posts in 773 days


#5 posted 01-31-2018 09:21 PM

I have a Delta 46-715 lathe (originally with a Reeves drive). My understanding is that the 46-715 Reeves drive was even more unreliable than the earlier model Delta lathes with Reeves drive (such as the 46-700 or 46-701). I have converted my 46-715 from Reeves drive to being powered with a treadmill motor (and thus I am now able to control speed from about 30 rpm to 2000 rpm with a simple twist of the potentiometer (AKA fancy rheostat).

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Sawdustonmyshoulder

475 posts in 3656 days


#6 posted 01-31-2018 09:50 PM

I too have a Delta 46-715 that I converted to a treadmill motor. I really like the variable speed it affords but I find mine a bit under powered. It takes some getting use to. I have to make lighter cuts if I want to maintain speed.

I have a 180 volt 3HP DC motor but it will require a good bit of engineering to fit on this lathe. May just sell this lathe and buy a show-nuff EVS lathe for my retirement.

Pete_LJ and I converted ours about the same time.

Here is my blog on the conversion: Lathe with treadmill motor

-- The more skilled you are at something, the worse you are at it when someone is watching.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6768 posts in 2226 days


#7 posted 01-31-2018 10:09 PM

I too have a Delta 46-715 that I converted to a treadmill motor. I really like the variable speed it affords but I find mine a bit under powered. It takes some getting use to. I have to make lighter cuts if I want to maintain speed.

I have a 180 volt 3HP DC motor but it will require a good bit of engineering to fit on this lathe. May just sell this lathe and buy a show-nuff EVS lathe for my retirement.

Pete_LJ and I converted ours about the same time.
- Sawdustonmyshoulder

If you are using the controller out of a treadmill (ie: MC60 or similar), then you are probably running that motor at less than half power… those controllers can’t/don’t supply anywhere near 180v. If you want more power, you could always replace it with a lower voltage rated motor (~95v), which are also typically found on treadmills. Or – if you want to duplicate the EVS without paying out the nose, find a three phase motor (they can usually be had for cheap) and a VFD, which is what most EVS lathes these days are using.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Sawdustonmyshoulder

475 posts in 3656 days


#8 posted 01-31-2018 10:44 PM

MrUnix,

sorry but I think I got you off on a tangent. I am using a treadmill motor and a MC 60 controller. I get plenty of speed out of the motor/controller combo now but when the motor gets taxed, the controller will send more voltage but there is a lag. Sorry for the confusion.

I scraped a treadmill with a 180 volt motor and controller. I haven’t installed it on the lathe and don’t know if I will. I only paid $10 for the treadmill because the folks that had it, didn’t have 220 volt plugs in their house. I scraped it but sold several parts on eBay and made around $200 on these parts. (Sweet!!)

Thanks for the suggestion of the 3 phase motor. Can you expound on what a ‘VFD’ is? Thanks.

-- The more skilled you are at something, the worse you are at it when someone is watching.

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MrUnix

6768 posts in 2226 days


#9 posted 01-31-2018 10:58 PM

MrUnix,
sorry but I think I got you off on a tangent. I am using a treadmill motor and a MC 60 controller. I get plenty of speed out of the motor/controller combo now but when the motor gets taxed, the controller will send more voltage but there is a lag. Sorry for the confusion.

Not a problem… there are PMDC treadmill motors out there rated at 180v (DC), but the MC-60 can’t supply that much voltage – so using it with one will reduce the horsepower of the motor. That was my only intention in mentioning it, as it sounded like that is what you had.

Thanks for the suggestion of the 3 phase motor. Can you expound on what a VFD is? Thanks.
- Sawdustonmyshoulder

Variable frequency drive – will not only control the speed of a three phase motor, but also does the phase conversion for you (single to three phase) so you can run it on your household current. If you get a 1hp motor, you can actually run it on 120v if you want (will produce 240v three phase output). Also gives you some nice features like soft start, controlled braking, forward/reverse capabilities and lots of other goodies.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Sawdustonmyshoulder

475 posts in 3656 days


#10 posted 02-01-2018 03:36 PM

MrUnix,

Wow!!! I’m all over this!!!!!

I have a few electronics ‘eggheads’ in my department. I going to sic them dogs on this today.

-- The more skilled you are at something, the worse you are at it when someone is watching.

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