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Table Saw Belt Wobble

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Forum topic by IantheTinker posted 01-28-2018 03:18 AM 732 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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IantheTinker

249 posts in 247 days


01-28-2018 03:18 AM

Topic tags/keywords: belt wobble table saw cover

Today I made some covers for the back of my contractor table saw, they simply attach with magnets and have gaps cut out to fit around the belts.

I noticed during this project that the belts on my table saw seem to wobble an excessive amount.

I tried to photograph the difference between when they are stationary (last belt pic) and moving (the first two belt pics). I am not sure if I captured it accurately though. There is perhaps as much as 1/2” to 3/4” of wobble up and down. These are “V” belts that were on the saw when I got it.

Side note, should I upgrade to a link belt, is it worth the money?

Thanks!

-- opiningminnesotan.com


19 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12340 posts in 2500 days


#1 posted 01-28-2018 04:10 AM

Link belt made a big difference on my saw.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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bilyo

304 posts in 1223 days


#2 posted 01-28-2018 04:20 AM

I can’t be sure without seeing it run. V belts tend to be rather stiff. Link belts will run much smoother. Based on your description, I would guess that replacing the V with link belts will solve your problem. Looking at your pictures, it doesn’t look like the V belts are in a lot of tension. If that is the case, it will allow them to vibrate up and down a bit. I bought a green link belt from Harbor Freight and it works just as well as the more expensive ones.

If the new belt of the same length doesn’t stop the vibration, try experimenting with making the belt longer so the motor lays back farther and puts more tension on it. This is another advantage of the link belt; you can easily change length.

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BFamous

158 posts in 241 days


#3 posted 01-28-2018 04:59 AM

Love my link belts.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

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IantheTinker

249 posts in 247 days


#4 posted 01-28-2018 05:03 AM



I can t be sure without seeing it run. V belts tend to be rather stiff. Link belts will run much smoother. Based on your description, I would guess that replacing the V with link belts will solve your problem. Looking at your pictures, it doesn t look like the V belts are in a lot of tension. If that is the case, it will allow them to vibrate up and down a bit. I bought a green link belt from Harbor Freight and it works just as well as the more expensive ones.

If the new belt of the same length doesn t stop the vibration, try experimenting with making the belt longer so the motor lays back farther and puts more tension on it. This is another advantage of the link belt; you can easily change length.

- bilyo

I was looking at the Harbor Freight one just the other day, but I hadn’t read any reviews yet so I didn’t pull the trigger on it. That, and I couldn’t remember the width of the current belts. I wonder, would I need two link belts because there are two v belts already on it? I am also pretty sure the one I saw at Harbor Freight would be too wide for the v shaped pulleys on the drive shaft of the motor.

Well great, now I have more stuff to think about…lol.

-- opiningminnesotan.com

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bilyo

304 posts in 1223 days


#5 posted 01-28-2018 05:31 PM


I was looking at the Harbor Freight one just the other day, but I hadn’t read any reviews yet so I didn’t pull the trigger on it. That, and I couldn’t remember the width of the current belts. I wonder, would I need two link belts because there are two v belts already on it? I am also pretty sure the one I saw at Harbor Freight would be too wide for the v shaped pulleys on the drive shaft of the motor.

Well great, now I have more stuff to think about…lol. IantheTinker

While a lot of us recommend link belts, you may solve your immediate problem by adjusting the belt tension. If that works, then you can take your time deciding on the link belts. Be careful you don’t over tension. If you don’t have any information on how to do this, you might try going to the “Old Woodworking Machines site and post a question. You will need make and model information.

Please let us know how it works out.

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thimmaker

17 posts in 242 days


#6 posted 01-28-2018 06:08 PM

That setup looks similar to my 60 year old Craftsman that I still use, cuts perfectly. For sure the belt tension is bad. Use a longer belt and let the motor hang down to set the tension, and why 2 belts? A new 1/2” pulley is cheap to put on both shafts and splve the problem? And what is the variable pulley on the end for?

-- thimmaker

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tomsteve

808 posts in 1339 days


#7 posted 01-28-2018 07:25 PM

another possibility could be that the belts get a ‘set” into them. when the TS sits unused for a peroid of time, the belts can take the shape of the pulleys they rest in. upon startup that “set’ goes round and round for a while.

mine can get that “set” in the belts when it sits for a period of time( happens on my drill presses,too). then when i get a project going with a lot of TS work it disappears.

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IantheTinker

249 posts in 247 days


#8 posted 01-28-2018 10:19 PM



That setup looks similar to my 60 year old Craftsman that I still use, cuts perfectly. For sure the belt tension is bad. Use a longer belt and let the motor hang down to set the tension, and why 2 belts? A new 1/2” pulley is cheap to put on both shafts and splve the problem? And what is the variable pulley on the end for?

- thimmaker

I have no clue as to what the pulley on the end was originally used for or why there are two belts used on the motor. I have zero experience when it comes to motors and whatnot so I am learning as I go. I was hoping to be able to take it down to one belt, preferably 1/2” since those seem the most common. I would need a new pulley for that and I have never replaced pulley such on a motor before.

-- opiningminnesotan.com

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IantheTinker

249 posts in 247 days


#9 posted 01-28-2018 10:20 PM



another possibility could be that the belts get a set” into them. when the TS sits unused for a peroid of time, the belts can take the shape of the pulleys they rest in. upon startup that “set goes round and round for a while.

mine can get that “set” in the belts when it sits for a period of time( happens on my drill presses,too). then when i get a project going with a lot of TS work it disappears.

- tomsteve

You could very well be right, I will check it after I run the saw for a while during my next project.

-- opiningminnesotan.com

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Sark

74 posts in 481 days


#10 posted 01-29-2018 03:07 AM

Matched belts is another option. It looks like one belt is more stretched than another. So two new matched belts might solve the vibration problem for less money than the link belts. That being said, I used link belts on my contractor type saws. They really help

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Woodknack

12340 posts in 2500 days


#11 posted 01-29-2018 07:48 AM

You are smart to consider belt width, I didn’t. I bought the HF green belt and it’s wider than the factory belt and a lot noisier. I actually ended up putting the original belt back on recently until I can get a link belt in the proper width.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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JeffRandels

1 post in 238 days


#12 posted 01-29-2018 11:23 AM

I noted a nice reduction in noise with the green link belt over the original v-belt on my Craftsman 113. Worth the cost at HF for me
Jeff

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SweetTea

352 posts in 780 days


#13 posted 01-29-2018 11:52 AM

Would a different pulley not change the factory specs on the blade speed and possibly cause issues? If you do end up replacing the pulleys, (which I do recommend along with the belts), I would go with some new pulleys that are factory spec to the stock ones. Might also be a good time to replace the bearings in the motor and the arbor too. You can get bearings for these saws for under $20.

View d38's profile

d38

104 posts in 382 days


#14 posted 01-29-2018 01:53 PM

I recently installed machined pulleys and link belt from http://www.in-lineindustries.com/
Wow, it runs smooth now (and a few weeks prior I bought a replacement V-belt from an auto store that wasn’t any better than 20 year old factory belt).
Check out his web page and see if he sells pulleys for your saw.
If you don’t want to change pulleys, he does sell both 3/8 and 1/2 inch link belt. They do ride higher on the pulley. I’d suggest calling/emailing to ensure correct width needed.

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thimmaker

17 posts in 242 days


#15 posted 01-29-2018 02:56 PM

There’s probably 1 set screw that holds that entire unit on the motor shaft and its close to the motor. Loosen it and pull the whole unit off. Most table saws have the same diameter pulley on the motor as on the blade, so the blade runs at the motor speed, 3450 rpm. Doesn’t matter what diameter the pulleys are as long as their both the same!! A slightly larger diameter than whats on there will run a little smoother as long as the diameter does not interfere with the blade mount. 2 1/2” diameter is pretty standard. Ace hardware has them as well as any of the big stores.
Geo.

-- thimmaker

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