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HELP! Cutting 45 degree angles on long strips

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Forum topic by Luke posted 03-31-2011 02:48 AM 4571 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Luke

538 posts in 1948 days


03-31-2011 02:48 AM

Topic tags/keywords: quartersawn oak quadralinear tablesaw 45 degree angled cut question oak milling greene and greene

I am making quadralinear quartersawn oak legs for a table I’m building. In other words I want all four sides of the leg to show the rays in the oak. I have cut down my stock so that each is .75 thick and shows the rays. The finished size of the legs should be 1.5” x 1.5” so I’ll just need to do what I show in the picture here and cut the two corresponding 45’s into the boards. My table saw will not tilt to 4 due to the incra TS-LS rail being in the way so that’s not an easy fix. I’d have to take the whole rail off. However I have access to another table saw that will cut this so no problem there.

My main reason for putting this on the forums is to see if anyone has a better way to do this or thinks that the table saw just won’t work for these two cuts. I’m not even really sure that this is safe or won’t cause huge problems trying to do this on the table saw.

I thought about the router table but I think I would need an upside down 45 degree bevel bit to do it so that the flat part stays against the table.

Thanks in advance.

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com


11 replies so far

View drewnahant's profile

drewnahant

218 posts in 1743 days


#1 posted 03-31-2011 03:03 AM

if you want to do it on the router table, the first side should be fine, because you still have a substatial amount of flat area on the table, for the second side, I would create an outfeed spacer, so that the angled side sits flat on that, instead of on the table. think of how the outfeed of a jointer is offset from the infeed to match the height of the cutter, same Idea here. however, I think that the table saw is a better way to do it.

you could actually do it with a jointer if you have one, set the fence to 45 and take down one side, then set to 90 and cut the other with the first angled side on the fence

View superstretch's profile

superstretch

1504 posts in 1347 days


#2 posted 03-31-2011 04:50 AM

Sounds to me like you could take two straight pieces of wood, maybe 24” x 3” x 3/4” and tack them at a 90 degree angle to each other (so they look like a big piece of angle iron). Clamp one side to a table saw fence and use the other as a 3/4” high fence. You could also make a jig for a band saw that lets you run the board through at a 45, but that might be more trouble than its worth

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1311 posts in 1463 days


#3 posted 03-31-2011 05:25 AM

Tablesaw. Run once to right of blade ,swap ends then run from left of blade. Just need to watch that gap between fence and table top if its not tight you can clamp a temp. strip to the fence.

View Luke's profile

Luke

538 posts in 1948 days


#4 posted 03-31-2011 07:03 AM

Here’s the first step I decided on. Now I gotta joint this edge and figure how to do the other angle.

I’ll repost when I get it.

Thanks Drew, band saw, and it was easy to set up. Thanks all posting soon.

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

View superstretch's profile

superstretch

1504 posts in 1347 days


#5 posted 03-31-2011 03:26 PM

If its a 45, place the longer end along the fence and move the fence closer. Keep the board flush against the fence and you should be good.

-- Dan, Rochester, NY

View Mike Gager's profile

Mike Gager

615 posts in 1921 days


#6 posted 04-01-2011 01:27 AM

just make a fixture that is 22.5 degrees and tilt your blade 22.5 and the attach the piece you want to cut to the fixture and run it through. youll have to figure out the best way to do it depending on which way your blade tilts

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1308 days


#7 posted 04-01-2011 03:49 AM

I would use bow saw to rough it out and clean up the mess with a fore plane.

So to translate that into the world of power-tools An angled ramp and a finely tuned band-saw, I would avoid the TS.

Good luck.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Luke's profile

Luke

538 posts in 1948 days


#8 posted 04-01-2011 03:05 PM

I ended up using the same setup as above in my sideways picture of the bandsaw. Sorry about that, I didn’t notice it was crooked till after it was too late. Hope this one goes straight up and down.
Anyhow, I just moved the fence closer to the blade than before and cut the other angle, then jointed the edge again for a nice smooth face on both sides. Here’s where i’m at now. I glued up all four legs with tape as clamps pulling it tight around the edges. Thanks for this tips guys. I like that jig would have been perfect except that my saw doesn’t go to 45 degrees. At least I think that’s what you would need to do with that one. I may be seeing it wrong. Yeah RG that would be great if I was that good at hand tools.

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1308 days


#9 posted 04-02-2011 04:12 AM

Good work. Can’t wait to see the finished project. What I did not tell you is I would run into scraping hell with the quartersawn grain, so it does not matter what approach you take, you are going to have some obstacles to overcome.

Really good with hand tools would have suggested a hewing hatchet as it would be faster than the saw but I figured that would have been taking things a bit far off topic.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View Luke's profile

Luke

538 posts in 1948 days


#10 posted 04-04-2011 03:15 PM

Here it is. One of the legs anyways. They turned out pretty good. I’m making a quartersawn oak end table so when it’s done I’ll post it up in my projects.

Thanks guys.

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1308 days


#11 posted 04-04-2011 03:20 PM

lookin’ good.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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