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Squaring blade to miter slot... problems...

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Forum topic by LucasWoods posted 01-27-2018 03:59 AM 738 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LucasWoods

445 posts in 1481 days


01-27-2018 03:59 AM

I am sitting at .56+mm difference from the front of my blade to the back of the blade. I have already moved the back trunnion as far over as it can go.

What are my options?

I own a Grizzly G1022 contractor saw.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF


16 replies so far

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1066 posts in 1688 days


#1 posted 01-27-2018 04:11 AM

Did you move the front in the opposite direction?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6948 posts in 2347 days


#2 posted 01-27-2018 04:11 AM

I am sitting at .56+mm difference from the front of my blade to the back of the blade. I have already moved the back trunnion as far over as it can go.

What are my options?

I own a Grizzly G1022 contractor saw.

- LucasWoods

Try moving the front the opposite direction.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

944 posts in 1590 days


#3 posted 01-27-2018 05:20 AM

If the above advice doesn’t work, you can probably slot-out the bolt holes.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View IantheTinker's profile

IantheTinker

253 posts in 275 days


#4 posted 01-27-2018 05:28 AM

I suppose you could always shim the blade somehow, or perhaps your arbor is off a smidge. The other guys had better advice, I just wanted to throw out someth8ng different. Wouldn’t want to be a conformist, right? :)

-- opiningminnesotan.com

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LucasWoods

445 posts in 1481 days


#5 posted 01-27-2018 06:36 AM

I was hoping for suggestions where I didn’t have to move the other trunnion. It just means about 45 minutes of taking the cabinet off so I can reach the front trunnion to loosen the bolts. But it looks like that is the next logical step.

What tolerance should I be shooting for?

And how do I slot out the bolt holes if it comes to it?

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

944 posts in 1590 days


#6 posted 01-27-2018 07:24 AM


What tolerance should I be shooting for?

This is a personal choice (some folks are more tolerant than others) but I would aim for .005” or less.

And how do I slot out the bolt holes if it comes to it?

Round file or die grinder.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View toolie's profile

toolie

2144 posts in 2777 days


#7 posted 01-27-2018 01:53 PM

.001” is achievable with a bit of patience. It’s usually a good idea, assuming table mounted grunions, to loosen all bolts leaving just one “snug” to act as s pivot point during the alignment exercise.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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LucasWoods

445 posts in 1481 days


#8 posted 01-27-2018 04:24 PM

Thank you. I got a few round files and filing the hole where the trunnion bolt goes intonwont affect the bolt being able to be tightened?

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

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LucasWoods

445 posts in 1481 days


#9 posted 01-28-2018 02:23 AM

Filing the hole won’t mess with the threads for the trunnion bolt? It will still tighten down?

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

944 posts in 1590 days


#10 posted 01-28-2018 02:44 AM

Don’t file the threads—file the through-hole.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View sras's profile

sras

4884 posts in 3277 days


#11 posted 01-28-2018 03:23 AM

I have never had to deal with this, but I thought this discussion would have focused on shifting the table instead of the trunnion. Am I missing something?

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View jerryminer's profile

jerryminer

944 posts in 1590 days


#12 posted 01-28-2018 03:35 AM



I have never had to deal with this, but I thought this discussion would have focused on shifting the table instead of the trunnion. Am I missing something?

- sras


In a “contractor’s saw” the trunnions are attached to the table, so the adjustment is made in the trunnion-to-table connection. In a “cabinet saw” the trunnions are attached to the cabinet, so the adjustment is made in the table-to-cabinet connection.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

445 posts in 1481 days


#13 posted 01-28-2018 03:54 AM

Duh thank you all lol I completely spaced the trunnion itself has no threads.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

View sras's profile

sras

4884 posts in 3277 days


#14 posted 01-28-2018 04:32 PM



In a “contractor s saw” the trunnions are attached to the table, so the adjustment is made in the trunnion-to-table connection. In a “cabinet saw” the trunnions are attached to the cabinet, so the adjustment is made in the table-to-cabinet connection.

- jerryminer

Thanks! I learned something…

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View AxkMan's profile

AxkMan

65 posts in 274 days


#15 posted 01-29-2018 03:21 AM

That’s good advice.

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

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