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Another planer question?????

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Forum topic by msinc posted 01-24-2018 11:50 PM 769 views 0 times favorited 31 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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msinc

430 posts in 531 days


01-24-2018 11:50 PM

I currently have a 735 with the wings, a depth gauge and the wheeled table. It works fine and I like it. For the money I have absolutely zero complaints at all. I am lucky enough to own a forest of trees at my disposal {once got accused on here of “log rustling”!!!} and ten miles away there’s a saw mill that does excellent work. I use the planer quite a lot to surface all the rough cut lumber I go thru. It does not take out “cup” or side to side warp. Previously I had a 15” Grizzly “stand alone” and it also worked fantastic, but it would not take out cup either. Using either planer, I could measure the amount of cupping, run the board and still have extremely very close to the same amount. I should throw in here that I am well aware of the concept of face joining.
In talking to the salesman about a bigger joiner he is telling me I just need a “better” planer. I said, “it’s my understanding, could be wrong, that a sled was the way to get cup out of a board with a planer”. Given my limited knowledge base, it might not be the only way, but it’s the only way I know of to remove side to side warp or cup from a board with a planer. He insisted that a better planer was the answer, not a sled. I asked him twice and he maintains that no sled is needed. Not out to discuss brands, but the planer he is suggesting does not appear to be any different in design or type than any other planer I have ever seen. It does however have a Byrd Shelix cutter head.
Even with the Shelix, the planer still “clamps” down on the board and the rollers run it thru with the cup or side to side warp pressed flat so it gets shaved as flat as it’s held, correct?? Then when it gets spit out the other end it returns to the same cupped or warped state prior to being “surfaced”, correct? Or no? Is there some other type of planer that takes out cup without a sled? and/or does the addition of a Shelix cutter head by and of itself allow the planer to remove warp or cup and make a board flat without a sled????? I guess I should throw in a disclaimer here that I am talking about surfacing five quarter rough cut lumber for use in typical cabinet/furniture type work, as you would get from the saw mill, not 2” or thicker lumber that wont flex when being surfaced. As always, thanks in advance for any info, it is greatly appreciated. I am going to jam this salesman up some more about this when I go to pick up my next machine, which should be soon…just want to get as much info as I can.


31 replies so far

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

950 posts in 843 days


#1 posted 01-25-2018 12:35 AM

You need to stop dealing with that salesman. He is either profoundly ignorant or trying to trick you. In either case, he is not worth wasting your time on. You obviously know more about the subject than he does. Everything you said is correct and everything he said is wrong.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3675 days


#2 posted 01-25-2018 12:43 AM

The salesman may be confused. Often
face frame cabinet shops get by with just
a planer. Perhaps he’s been talking to those
guys who do that.

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msinc

430 posts in 531 days


#3 posted 01-25-2018 03:45 AM

Thanks fellas, I will bear this information carefully in mind.

View Alex Lane's profile

Alex Lane

508 posts in 3918 days


#4 posted 01-25-2018 04:15 AM

I wonder why nobody I know of has marketed a planer with the drive rollers or a conveyor belt under the board being fed through. With minimal down-pressure “idle” rollers on top to prevent the board lifting, wouldn’t that allow the planer to basically function as an upside down jointer, removing cup and truly flattening one side before planing to thickness

Million dollar idea here? :-)

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

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ArtMann

950 posts in 843 days


#5 posted 01-25-2018 04:22 AM

I cant’ think why it wouldn’t work. I use my drum sander in the way you suggest but it takes a long time to flatten a board taking off 0.015” per pass.

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Loren

10476 posts in 3675 days


#6 posted 01-25-2018 04:24 AM

.

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msinc

430 posts in 531 days


#7 posted 01-25-2018 04:27 AM


I wonder why nobody I know of has marketed a planer with the drive rollers or a conveyor belt under the board being fed through. With minimal down-pressure “idle” rollers on top to prevent the board lifting, wouldn t that allow the planer to basically function as an upside down jointer, removing cup and truly flattening one side before planing to thickness

Million dollar idea here? :-)

- Alex Lane

Yes sir, that sounds like a good enough idea to me!!! I have wondered about a small little plastic “kicker thing that was on a track to push the board thru the planer…kind of like those things at the automatic car wash that pushes your car thru. Rollers with a little tension to hold the board down would do it.
I guess they are too busy making saws that freeze instantly and destroy $100 plus worth of gizmo and another $100 blade if you touch it when it’s running to manufacture a machine that makes sense. Or how about a slider that takes up 20 feet long of shop space and basically turns a $5400 plus table saw into a $1600 panel saw?? Does anyone even make a first rate planer sled????

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msinc

430 posts in 531 days


#8 posted 01-25-2018 04:37 AM


I cant think why it wouldn t work. I use my drum sander in the way you suggest but it takes a long time to flatten a board taking off 0.015” per pass.

- ArtMann

Never having used a sled, does anyone use one and can tell us how much you can take off on one pass? Is it just like planing a board without it?
It must be me, but doesn’t it seem strange that no one has come up with a machine that will positively and easily make a board flat AND plane it to thickness quickly and at the same time? We went to the moon 49 years ago…but this is asking too much?

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3675 days


#9 posted 01-25-2018 04:44 AM

View msinc's profile

msinc

430 posts in 531 days


#10 posted 01-25-2018 05:00 AM

That thing failed the “easy” part….I am sure it is easy to use, but to pay for???

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4211 posts in 2336 days


#11 posted 01-25-2018 05:08 AM



- Loren


Is this going to raise my electric bill?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

227 posts in 1130 days


#12 posted 01-25-2018 04:08 PM



Never having used a sled, does anyone use one and can tell us how much you can take off on one pass? Is it just like planing a board without it?
- msinc

I have used a sled with my Dewalt 734 for several years and have successfully flattened a lot of cherry lumber with it.

First I have to state the obvious: Your wood must be dry or, once you have it flattened, it will likely cup or warp again as it continues to dry.

I use a very simple sled that is a torque box (made like a hollow core door) for stiffness and it has plastic laminate on the top. I simply stabilize the board I’m flattening on the sled with little wood wedges anywhere there are gaps under the board. The wedges get glued in with hot melt glue. Sled and board are then fed through the planer together using infeed and outfeed roller stands. I will run it through enough times (taking about 1/64” to 1/32” per pass) to produce a good reference plane for planing the other side and then remove it from the sled to finish planing both sides. The glue is easily poped off of the laminate with an old chisel.

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msinc

430 posts in 531 days


#13 posted 01-25-2018 06:54 PM

Thanks for the info, sir. Hot melt glue sounds like a much better way to hold the board on the sled. The sled I saw just used stick on pieces of sandpaper on the sled. The board being planed just sat on them. I guess as long as it didn’t move you were okay, but I didn’t like the idea from the start.

View PPK's profile

PPK

1047 posts in 837 days


#14 posted 01-25-2018 06:57 PM

Something interesting to note: I own the DeWalt 734 planer, and I ran several hundred BF of rough sawn cherry, and walnut through it. None of them were cupped BADLY, but some were definately cupped up to 3/16” over the 6-8” width. I took passes no greater than 1/16” (starting with the cup upwards), and removed it all very successfully. A lot of people love the 735, but I prefer the 734 for this reason and several others. Perhaps it could be a simple as the feed rollers have less pressure on them? I dunno…
But, a sled would sure solve your problem. Or running them across a wide jointer. I sure DON’T think that a larger more expensive planer would solve your problem of removing cupping.

-- Pete

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msinc

430 posts in 531 days


#15 posted 01-25-2018 07:06 PM



Something interesting to note: I own the DeWalt 734 planer, and I ran several hundred BF of rough sawn cherry, and walnut through it. None of them were cupped BADLY, but some were definately cupped up to 3/16” over the 6-8” width. I took passes no greater than 1/16” (starting with the cup upwards), and removed it all very successfully. A lot of people love the 735, but I prefer the 734 for this reason and several others. Perhaps it could be a simple as the feed rollers have less pressure on them? I dunno…
But, a sled would sure solve your problem. Or running them across a wide jointer. I sure DON T think that a larger more expensive planer would solve your problem of removing cupping.

- PPK

That is interesting…no matter how slow or fast or how light or heavy of a cut I take with the 735 it will not remove any cup at all. Not even 3/16”

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