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Jet 12' jointer/planer unboxing & setup

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Forum topic by MagicalMichael posted 01-24-2018 02:39 PM 876 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MagicalMichael

117 posts in 720 days


01-24-2018 02:39 PM

I am thinking about buying the Jet 12” combo machine and have read the review & responses from 2014, but they do not address my concern. Jet list the weight at 500 lbs and ships it in one box fully assembled except for the fence & dust port. So how do I get a mobility base onto this machine so I can move it into place in my shop?

Michael

-- michael


17 replies so far

View Steve's profile

Steve

755 posts in 786 days


#1 posted 01-24-2018 03:01 PM

If I had to guess, I”d say it would come on a pallet. So perhaps you could slide it off the pallet and onto the base?

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Loren

10477 posts in 3852 days


#2 posted 01-24-2018 03:16 PM

You can scoot it off the pallet onto the
mobile base. Any slight drop won’t harm
the machine. Some mobile bases go together
with bolts so one end can be left open to get
the machine in.

I’ve also used a chain fall and an engine hoist.

You can do it out yourself but for your first
rodeo you may appreciate a friend’s help.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1158 posts in 1020 days


#3 posted 01-24-2018 03:25 PM

I went through this same exercise about 2 years ago with a JJP-12HH. The first problem I had to deal with was the pallet not being built to accommodate a standard pallet jack or fork lift. As a result, the pallet was partially broken when I received it. The plywood sides of the crate were splitting open. That is just plain bad design. Fortunately, the machine was unaffected.

I used a Grizzly large capacity mobile base and the installation was relatively easy. It takes two people to do the job. Basically, what you do is partially assemble the base and slip it under the machine while it is tilted up. Then you tilt the other side up and mate this half with the rest of the assembly. At that point, you do a few size adjustments and you are done. The instructions are good.

I will warn you of one bad experience I had with the machine. The infeed, outfeed and planer tables are not smooth but have something like a sandblasted finish. Supposedly, it makes it easier to slide the material by the cutter. In my case, it did nothing of the sort. Imagine trying to use a jointer that has 180 grit sandpaper for a table finish. I would have sent the machine back but I had already had it in my shop for too long and the return would have been a big hassle. What I did was use sandpaper and a flat sanding block to smooth out the tables so they were usable. It took maybe 30 minutes. Then, I applied about 4 coats of Johnson’s paste wax to the surface and buffed it thoroughly. After doing all this work, I now have a machine that works well and I am satisfied with it.

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CaptainKlutz

602 posts in 1698 days


#4 posted 01-24-2018 03:40 PM

Easy, loads of possibilities for only 500lbs:

#1: Use a 1/2” rope block and tackle setup or a wire rope “come-along” on a cross brace on top of 2-4 rafters of garage ceiling to lift unit up vertical, then lower onto base. Can also make an oversized saw horse from 2×6 lumber (A-frame) to provide the lifting point. Harbor freight sells some inexpensive overhead cable winch options as well.

#2: Rent/borrow an automotive engine lift to hoist the unit up in air and roll base under it.

#3: Hire a tow truck with an extendable boom to stop by and lift it off the pallet onto mobile base.

#4: Invite a few friends over for a pizza party or BBQ.
6 people could lift it enough to allow another person to roll base under.
2 people could easily tip the machine a few inches required, while a third person rolls the base half way under one side. Can walk it off shipping pallet or if needed use some scrap lumber to protect edges of mobile base/tool stand, and “walk” the tool onto the base by tilting on two feet then pivot on one leg. With a closed stand, might need to use 2 wheeler as your pry bar to get underneath the stand, then use wedge blocks to support while mobile base is inserted.

Am sure there a few more ideas. :)

Best Luck.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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Loren

10477 posts in 3852 days


#5 posted 01-24-2018 03:41 PM

Some higher end machines have milled surfaces
with grooves. This prevents a “suction” effect
with flat material. It doesn’t make the iron
slicker but it does prevent wide boards from
“sticking” to the surface. I suppose wax might
wear off faster because of the reduced contact
area though.

I read a forum post where one guy bought a
nice European jointer and had it surfaced ground
to get rid of the grooves. He regretted doing
that. In the same thread another contributer
mentioned having to have 3 guys work at the
jointer on long, wide boards because the suction
of the flat ground tables was so intense they
needed a guy at each end to push or pull and
another at the middle to apply pressure over
the cutterhead.

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1158 posts in 1020 days


#6 posted 01-24-2018 04:35 PM

Here is a link to the instructions for the Grizzly mobile base I used. Read the section that is titled “Assemble Base Around Machine”.

http://cdn2.grizzly.com/manuals/d2057a_m.pdf

I can guarantee that this design works well for the JJP-12HH. I found it much, much easier than trying to slip the machine off the pallet onto the base or dead lifting the whole machine off the floor. I think it took about an hour with most of the time being spent assembling the base. Getting it under the machine was the easy part.

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ArtMann

1158 posts in 1020 days


#7 posted 01-24-2018 04:41 PM

I have had various planers and jointers for the last 40 years and I am aware of the suction phenomenon and the resistance it creates. The Jet design may have been a good idea but the actual surface was literally so rough that you could use it as sandpaper. I think it was probably a manufacturing defect in which they missed the last finishing pass on the cast iron. I can’t imagine the company would have created something like this on purpose.

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Sawdust35

31 posts in 1066 days


#8 posted 01-24-2018 04:49 PM

To get my 475lb 15” planer into my basement, I built a wood gantry with a winch from harbor freight. Also used gantry to assemble the machine on a mobile base. The gantry was lite enough to carry around by myself.

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Andre

2223 posts in 2010 days


#9 posted 01-24-2018 04:53 PM

I have the same machine, called a Scorpion here, She is a beast to move by yourself good way to hurt yourself!
The tables are very smooth haven’t had to big of problem with suction, I use glide coat spray seems to last a long time. You will love this machine, glass like finish, no real snipe, just a little hard to feed into planner as it has steel infeed rollers.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View MagicalMichael's profile

MagicalMichael

117 posts in 720 days


#10 posted 01-25-2018 09:15 PM

Thanks to everyone for all the suggestions. They really are helpful. Sorry to be slow in responding as I am dealing with a planer that wont start and recover from an infection. I have read through the suggestions and studied the manual at Grizzly. That last at least looked doable for three people of moderate strength. The Grizzly mobile base also looked more substantial than the Jet. Now I need to get over the hurdles of selling my jointer & planer, Wich are good, but small), shelling out for a new one, and all the work involved in setup.

Right now there’s no choice but to wait for the control unit to get back from the mfg. and continue building a new workbench/outfeed table.

Michael

-- michael

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runswithscissors

2895 posts in 2229 days


#11 posted 01-28-2018 06:50 AM

If you should try to hoist your new machine from the joists in your garage or shop, not only should you lay a stout timber across several joists, but also prop up the joists as close as possible to the load by clamping 2×4s vertically to give extra support. I have the same machine, and unloaded mine from the pickup with a 1 ton differential chain hoist (about $40 from HF). After driving the PU away, it was easy to lower the jointer/planer onto a dolly and roll it into the shop, where I hooked up the chain hoist again to raise it for placement on the mobile base. If your setup allows, you cold skip the dolly and just go onto the mobile base.

Really, these things aren’t that hard to do. I have unloaded all my heavy machines by myself (Unisaw, JJP-12HH, Jet shaper, 18” Grizzly bandsaw, drill press). That doesn’t mean I didn’t spend some time sweating about it in advance, however.

By way, I have the grooved tables too. Not in love with them, but I’ve gotten used to them, and I certainly wouldn’t let them be a deal breaker, there is so much else to like about the machine. My main gripe is the Euro style knife guard. Rather have a pork chop style, but tastes vary. (Sounds almost like a culinary remark)

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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MagicalMichael

117 posts in 720 days


#12 posted 01-28-2018 11:14 AM

I don’t own a hoist and my shop has a closed 10’ ceiling so I am limited to the man-up methods. I see that the Rikon version has the same built in system that my Rikon band saw has, so i’m wondering if perhaps you can get the two front wheels on while the machine is still on the pallet and then slide it off onto the wheels?

Michael

-- michael

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retfr8flyr

386 posts in 1873 days


#13 posted 01-28-2018 03:57 PM

I bought an engine hoist from Harbor Freight and used it for unpacking and mounting all my machines onto mobile bases. Works very well, with nylon straps, so nothing is marred during the procedure. You can get one on sale for about $139 and then sell it when you are finished, if you don’t have room to keep it. I kept mine and it comes in handy for several different things.

-- Earl

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3852 days


#14 posted 01-28-2018 04:04 PM



I don t own a hoist and my shop has a closed 10 ceiling so I am limited to the man-up methods. I see that the Rikon version has the same built in system that my Rikon band saw has, so i m wondering if perhaps you can get the two front wheels on while the machine is still on the pallet and then slide it off onto the wheels?

Michael

- MagicalMichael

Sure. Just stick a pry bar under the edge,
step on it and hold it down with your weight,
lean over and stick a couple of wedges under
the machine. Repeat until you get enough
clearance to get the wheels on.

View Andre's profile

Andre

2223 posts in 2010 days


#15 posted 01-28-2018 06:33 PM

I used 2 – 2”x12”x10’ that were laying around the yard and just slid it down to the ground while it was still on the pallet, dragged it to the shop door then uncrated it, put on a dolly then rolled it into place. Load and unload onto dolly be the lean tilt and jamb method with some grunts to get it in place! The 17” band saw had similar trip but a little more exciting being so top heavy.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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