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Repairing a crack

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Forum topic by wseand posted 03-28-2011 08:40 PM 897 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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wseand

2277 posts in 1700 days


03-28-2011 08:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question refurbishing

I am repairing an old chair and when I was putting the back on, it cracked. Any ideas on repairing this. I really can’t take it back out again because it will probably just crack further and it is already glued in place.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy


21 replies so far

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

12951 posts in 1351 days


#1 posted 03-28-2011 08:53 PM

Are you planning on refinishing the chair?

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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wseand

2277 posts in 1700 days


#2 posted 03-28-2011 09:05 PM

Yes, probably a dark walnut. Looks really isn’t a factor. It is in bad shape and only used for toddlers. The lady just wants to keep it in the family. It is about 40 years old.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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wseand

2277 posts in 1700 days


#3 posted 03-28-2011 09:08 PM

This is a picture of the chair, it is toddler size.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1656 days


#4 posted 03-28-2011 09:23 PM

Without taking it all apart, I would see about some epoxy. Keep working it in until it wont take any more. Then wait and work it in some more. It should be fine and if not, you would have had to resort to scarfing in another piece anyway so you really don’t have anything to lose.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

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wseand

2277 posts in 1700 days


#5 posted 03-28-2011 09:37 PM

I will try that David. Thanks for the idea. I was thinking about some sort of spline but I thought it would just weaken the wood having to cut into it.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View 8iowa's profile

8iowa

1489 posts in 2420 days


#6 posted 03-29-2011 01:15 AM

I’ve had good luck thinning Titebond II slightly with water and letting it flow into cracks with a little help from a squeegie, and then clamping as best as I can. I recently fixed the crack in the forearm of an O/U shotgun this way.

-- "Heaven is North of the Bridge"

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112105 posts in 2235 days


#7 posted 03-29-2011 01:26 AM

Epoxy or layers of CA glue .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1077 posts in 1489 days


#8 posted 03-29-2011 01:29 AM

I’ll put the third vote in for epoxy.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

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wseand

2277 posts in 1700 days


#9 posted 03-29-2011 01:47 AM

Thanks gents I put some Epoxy in there and will see how it works. I am hoping not to have to do any surgery on it, I have already put butterflies and dowels in three places.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View tenontim's profile

tenontim

2131 posts in 2403 days


#10 posted 03-29-2011 02:02 AM

I vote for epoxy also. You might try putting the resin and hardener bottles in some very warm water for about 10 minutes,before you mix them, to thin it out. Then inject it into the crack with a syringe and needle. The warm mix will flow better but will cut down the cure time, so if you using the quick set epoxy, don’t waste any time getting it in there.

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wseand

2277 posts in 1700 days


#11 posted 03-29-2011 03:53 AM

Thanks Tim, I opened it up as much as possible and got as much as possible in there, if it doesn’t work well I will end up scarfing some pieces on and making it look as good as I can.. Had to look up Scarfing, thanks for the lesson David.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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Tony_S

428 posts in 1741 days


#12 posted 03-29-2011 04:35 AM

Wish I’d seen this a bit sooner. Typically, when I have to fix (or stabilize) a crack, a check or anything similar to the issues you have here, I do use epoxy (West Systems) But I thin it with Xylene first. You can thin the epoxy to such a degree(almost like water) that when you apply it to the crack with a syringe, the epoxy is drawn in very deep.
The epoxy takes longer to set up when it’s mixed with Xylene (depends how much you thin it), but other than that, it works very well.

-- "The trouble with people idiot-proofing things, is the resulting evolution of the idiot."

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wseand

2277 posts in 1700 days


#13 posted 03-29-2011 04:48 AM

No worries Tony, I think I got in there pretty good.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112105 posts in 2235 days


#14 posted 03-29-2011 04:52 AM

http://www.amazon.com/M5-Thin-Viscosity-CA-Glue/dp/B000XIIZAQ this product is thin already. Turners use it all the time to file cracks .

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View wseand's profile

wseand

2277 posts in 1700 days


#15 posted 03-29-2011 05:41 AM

Thanks Jim, I will have to get some and try it out.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

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