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What kind of wood pegs do I use to peg white oak beams?

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Forum topic by metroplexchl posted 01-22-2018 02:49 AM 1236 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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metroplexchl

80 posts in 211 days


01-22-2018 02:49 AM

I’m building a workshop that is post and beam. I’d like to use joinery and pegs, but I was always told you use hardwood pegs to join softwood joints. Would hard wood joints take hardwood pegs if I lubed them up with wax?

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln


11 replies so far

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

10136 posts in 3335 days


#1 posted 01-22-2018 03:53 AM

Certainly not softwood pegs.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View mudflap4869's profile

mudflap4869

1565 posts in 1366 days


#2 posted 01-22-2018 06:25 AM

You mentioned white oak beams. Use the same wood (trenals = tree nails)) as the beams.

-- Still trying to master kindling making

View bold1's profile

bold1

291 posts in 1754 days


#3 posted 01-22-2018 11:40 AM

White oak split with the grain and then rounded.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

451 posts in 69 days


#4 posted 01-22-2018 01:27 PM

after you get tired of rounding white oak, it is very acceptable to go BORG
and get some 3/4” and 1” red oak dowel rods and use them. Pick up a couple
of high quality auger bits the same size and a high torque 1/2” corded electric drill with low RPMs.
hit your local Pawn Shops for the drill vs buying new. [keep the auger cutters as SHARP as possible].
your little cordless screwdriver drill should be used for driving screws – not a large auger bit.
if you can get the small parts to your drill press – you will have more accurate work.
you are basically building a pole barn with sides – not the Taj Mahal so it is very okay
to substitute things here and there to get the job done as efficiently, safely and quickly as possible.
again – good luck in your project. looking forward to photos once you get started.
oh – if you have a lathe, start building some 4” and 6” dia mallets out of some of the white oak.
(or have them made for you).

BTW: when do you expect to actually start this project ?

.

View metroplexchl's profile

metroplexchl

80 posts in 211 days


#5 posted 01-22-2018 01:54 PM



after you get tired of rounding white oak, it is very acceptable to go BORG
and get some 3/4” and 1” red oak dowel rods and use them. Pick up a couple
of high quality auger bits the same size and a high torque 1/2” corded electric drill with low RPMs.
hit your local Pawn Shops for the drill vs buying new. [keep the auger cutters as SHARP as possible].
your little cordless screwdriver drill should be used for driving screws – not a large auger bit.
if you can get the small parts to your drill press – you will have more accurate work.
you are basically building a pole barn with sides – not the Taj Mahal so it is very okay
to substitute things here and there to get the job done as efficiently, safely and quickly as possible.
again – good luck in your project. looking forward to photos once you get started.
oh – if you have a lathe, start building some 4” and 6” dia mallets out of some of the white oak.
(or have them made for you).

BTW: when do you expect to actually start this project ?

- John Smith

Always great advice from you, amigo! Thanks also to everyone. I think I’ll go with the red oak pegs. I have a VERY low torque hand drill that I think I’ll start using. I’m sure I’ll tire of that quickly and go with a craigslist drill that I”ll be looking for! ;-)

Great idea about the mallets!

As far as start date, I’m not sure. my permit info jsut went into the city for permit to start. That should take a couple of weeks at most. I’m currently collecting all the components that I’ve been planning hard for. Once I get the permit to proceed, I’ll start with the foundation which is pretty simple, but i go slowly to get it as level/square as possible. Then I’ll start with construction. I have 3 kiddos (one with special needs), so this is going to be completed as I have time to do it. It could take months unfortunately. But the benefit of going slowly is that I can hopefully fix or find work-arounds for all the mistakes I’m assuming I’ll make!

I’ll definitely be sharing pics. I am new to wood working on this scale an am looking forward to getting some experience that I can share on this forum. I hate that I ask so many questions but have little to share due to lack of experience. I guess we all start somewhere….

chris

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

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metroplexchl

80 posts in 211 days


#6 posted 01-22-2018 02:03 PM

PS – anyone ever used construction adhesive like liquid nails vs wood glue to join beams? I’ve never done it but was curious.

-- What ever you do, be good at it. -Abe Lincoln

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1327 posts in 827 days


#7 posted 01-22-2018 02:05 PM

metroplexchl,

Here is a source for waxed timber framing pegs, including draw bore pegs, in several species.

http://www.pegs.us/

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

451 posts in 69 days


#8 posted 01-22-2018 02:14 PM

I will get out some photos of a barn that my grandfather and great grandfather
built over a hundred years ago and it is still standing today.
they never used any caulking or adhesives. Timber Framers would CRINGE at the mere thought of it.

it may be in your best interest to visit your local library and read up on Timber Framing.
or- if you don’t want to do the library thing – google Timber Framing Techniques and you will
find many good pointers.

Pinterest is your friend:
https://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?rs=ac&len=2&q=timber%20frame%20joints&eq=timber%20frame%20joints&etslf=NaN&term_meta[]=timber%7Cautocomplete%7Cundefined&term_meta[]=frame%7Cautocomplete%7Cundefined&term_meta[]=joints%7Cautocomplete%7Cundefined

.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

8898 posts in 1393 days


#9 posted 01-22-2018 02:42 PM

Just a thought

Red oak is like a straw. Easily absorbs moisture. What’ll happen if the red oak pegs rot eventually? Just a thought.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

116906 posts in 3484 days


#10 posted 01-22-2018 02:53 PM

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

451 posts in 69 days


#11 posted 01-22-2018 02:56 PM

rot ?? maybe – maybe not.
IF a red oak dowel absorbs as much moisture as you say, IMHO, it will only make the joint tighter.
if that was a true concern, I would soak the dowels in a sealer prior to insertion to block the absorption.
but – if this were my project – I would use them straight out of the store.

jus my Dos Centavos

.

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