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Forum topic by bassman2 posted 01-21-2018 02:32 AM 642 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bassman2

11 posts in 369 days


01-21-2018 02:32 AM

I’m working on a stair case project. The actual stair case is made from steel I-beams. There are 8 steps up, then a landing, and 8 steps up the opposite direction.

I have 16 solid oak slabs 2” thick that I cut down from several 13’ long slabs I have.

The landing is 82” by 42 7/8”. I have two large slabs 2” thick that will make the landing.

The question I have for you guys is straight forward. Should I glue the two slabs together to make one big table top landing? OR should I simply give each one a slight rounded edge and push them together and fasten to the metal landing?

My plan was to break out my Domino and glue them up. But I’m re-thinking now due to how difficult it may be to install the landing as a single large piece.


12 replies so far

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cabmaker

1740 posts in 2955 days


#1 posted 01-21-2018 01:25 PM

Need more info!

Ie: interior exterior, what are you calling staircase ? Are you gonna be able to change landing height in relation to existing risers ? Are stringers the only thing constructed so far ?

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Tony_S

924 posts in 3229 days


#2 posted 01-21-2018 03:10 PM

Dry assemble including domino’s(or biscuits), prep and sand the whole thing in 2 pc’s. Pull it apart and install in two pieces, dry fit again(to figure out your game plan), and then glue it together in place. As long as you do a good job during the prep, sanding the glue joints in place is usually pretty minimal. I’ve done it this way dozen’s of times.Most recent one was 5’x10’ in 3 pc’s 3” thick.
“Modern Industrial” is pretty popular right now.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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bassman2

11 posts in 369 days


#3 posted 01-21-2018 05:08 PM

Yes – modern industrial is the style of the entire house.

This is an interior staircase and everything is fixed height due to it being all welded & bolted together steel. The only wood in the entire thing are the treads and the landing surfaces.

I’m a little concerned because the landing slabs are “captured” on all 4 sides by steel – and the landing sits down flush into the structure. If I glue in place, I can’t get clamps on it.

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Walker

146 posts in 619 days


#4 posted 01-21-2018 06:51 PM

Do you have access to the underside? maybe use some cleats like a table top?

-- ~Walker

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Carloz

1147 posts in 738 days


#5 posted 01-21-2018 08:31 PM

Who built those stairs? If it was on your watch you should demand them to rebuild it the number of steps should be odd otherwise people will be stumbling on the last step.

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Tony_S

924 posts in 3229 days


#6 posted 01-21-2018 09:00 PM


Who built those stairs? If it was on your watch you should demand them to rebuild it the number of steps should be odd otherwise people will be stumbling on the last step.

- Carloz

Old wives tale…

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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Tony_S

924 posts in 3229 days


#7 posted 01-21-2018 09:11 PM



I m a little concerned because the landing slabs are “captured” on all 4 sides by steel – and the landing sits down flush into the structure. If I glue in place, I can t get clamps on it.

- bassman2

Been faced with similar situations as well. If you have access from the underside, which you typically do with designs like these, you can use hanger bolts(and plugs) to pull the pieces together.
Really It all depends on what’s deemed acceptable by you, or the customer. If you or they don’t have an issue with a profiled joint in the middle of the landing, do it that way.
I couldn’t get away with it most of the time….designers and architects are ‘funny’ like that.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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bassman2

11 posts in 369 days


#8 posted 01-22-2018 12:09 AM

I am the customer! And this is the second set of steel I-beam stairs! The first set was geometrically wrong and couldn’t pass code. The fab guy was embarrassed big time. The stair case itself is BEEFY and had to be 100% re-done, (couldn’t reuse the pieces due to the raw/clear finish).

The new case gets installed tomorrow. And I’m nearly ready for a 100% test fit. I’m waiting for my last cross cuts and platform rip until I physically put hands on the staircase. I don’t trust the measurements the fab shop gave me!!

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Tony_S

924 posts in 3229 days


#9 posted 01-22-2018 12:28 AM

Good steel guys that do accurate, clean stair work are hard to find….and I’ve always found it best to only let them build them, not design them. Most of steel stair fab companies I’ve come across are more accustomed to commercial building codes than residential.
Good luck! Post some pictures when you’re done!

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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Walker

146 posts in 619 days


#10 posted 01-22-2018 01:55 AM

if you assemble/glue in place…in lieu of clamps perhaps you could use some temporary wedges between the steel and the outside edges of the wood to push the glue joint together.

-- ~Walker

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bilyo

345 posts in 1249 days


#11 posted 01-27-2018 03:46 PM



I m a little concerned because the landing slabs are “captured” on all 4 sides by steel – and the landing sits down flush into the structure. If I glue in place, I can t get clamps on it.
- bassman2

Walker suggests using wedges to squeeze the joint together until dry. Good idea.
I would be even more concerned about the slab being “captured” on all 4 sides. This would allow no room for expansion. If the slab expands there will be trouble somewhere. If the steel doesn’t give, the slab will likely buckle. With a slab that size, there is the possibility for a lot of movement. You should make sure that your wood to steel fasteners allow for adequate wood movement in both expansion and contraction. You can find tables on the web providing amounts of expansion/contraction to expect based on wood species.

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bassman2

11 posts in 369 days


#12 posted 01-27-2018 05:33 PM

I had planned on allowing for some movement by using oblong holes in the steel. I’ll check the web for actual numbers for white oak. Thanks for the advice!!

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