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Fixing a bad glue joint - saggy case

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Forum topic by GabeATX posted 01-20-2018 05:40 PM 1359 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GabeATX

11 posts in 578 days


01-20-2018 05:40 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question mistake

Hey folks, looking for some ideas on how to fix a mistake. I am making a credenza (walnut plywood and faceframe) with a 75” top and some vertical supports for drawers. Not sure how I did this, but I cut the supports too short and glued them up without realizing the error. —the top is now sagging, being pulled down by the vertical supports. Titebond III and it’s been sitting for a week, so no easy ctrl-Z.

The attached image kind of shows it, the corner joints are all good, but the vertical pieces are too short and the top is pulled into a sag. We’re talking 3/16” of sag.

I’m thinking of using circular saw to just cut the vertical pieces in half horizontally, then inserting a shim between the halves. Then use cauls/clamps to glue it up straight.

This inside area of the case will be hidden from view, so my main concern is whether it will be hard to end up with two perfectly parallel pieces on which to mount my drawer slides.

Here’s a drawing, the whole deal is a trapezoid but the top should be flat.


11 replies so far

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TheFridge

8867 posts in 1390 days


#1 posted 01-20-2018 05:53 PM

Use a flush cut saw along the top?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Rick_M

11101 posts in 2284 days


#2 posted 01-20-2018 06:14 PM



Use a flush cut saw along the top?

- TheFridge


+1 then shim

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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GabeATX

11 posts in 578 days


#3 posted 01-20-2018 06:42 PM

OK, tried this and looks like it will work well. Certainly less destructive than the circular saw option. Thank you!

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shipwright

7894 posts in 2702 days


#4 posted 01-20-2018 06:49 PM

Consider switching to hide glue, hot or liquid. It can be reversed with the combined application of heat and moisture.
Many high end custom furniture makers use nothing else.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Andre

1659 posts in 1710 days


#5 posted 01-20-2018 06:53 PM



Consider switching to hide glue, hot or liquid. It can be reversed with the combined application of heat and moisture.
Many high end custom furniture makers use nothing else.

- shipwright

My only problem is for large projects not enough work time? And my Glue pot is to small! Maybe I am too slow?

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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shipwright

7894 posts in 2702 days


#6 posted 01-20-2018 11:02 PM


My only problem is for large projects not enough work time? And my Glue pot is to small! Maybe I am too slow?

- Andre

That’s where you use liquid. Old Brown Glue is probably the best. Lots of open time for larger projects.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Rich

2279 posts in 494 days


#7 posted 01-21-2018 04:51 AM


That’s where you use liquid. Old Brown Glue is probably the best. Lots of open time for larger projects.

- shipwright

Or make your own a lot cheaper. Since you already have the glue granules, all you need is urea and water. Recipes and directions are available online. Also, you can simply add urea to your hot glue pot. It won’t be liquid glue that you can store in a bottle, but it’ll extend the open time. Experiment with what works best for you.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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jbay

2041 posts in 804 days


#8 posted 01-21-2018 05:13 AM


That’s where you use liquid. Old Brown Glue is probably the best. Lots of open time for larger projects.

- shipwright

Or make your own a lot cheaper. Since you already have the glue granules, all you need is urea and water. Recipes and directions are available online. Also, you can simply add urea to your hot glue pot. It won t be liquid glue that you can store in a bottle, but it ll extend the open time. Experiment with what works best for you.

- Rich

I’m trying to make some right now.
The only hides I have are squirrel and rabbit.
I boiled them in water and am clamping them with my veneer press, but so far I’m not getting any glue.

-- If anyone would like to see my Portfolio, PM me and I would be glad to send you the link.

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TheFridge

8867 posts in 1390 days


#9 posted 01-21-2018 05:26 AM

This guy ^ :)

Was gonna make the same recommendation for HHG but deleted it. It really is great stuff.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Rich

2279 posts in 494 days


#10 posted 01-21-2018 05:32 AM

I think shipwright keeps 50 or 60 lbs on hand, maybe he’ll share. Paul, I bought the 6 lb jar from Patrick. I’m more than half way through it. Where do you get yours? I thought those 6 lbs would last me a few years, but now that I’m a hide glue junky, it’s going fast.

-- No matter how much you push the envelope, it'll still be stationery.

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shipwright

7894 posts in 2702 days


#11 posted 01-21-2018 02:33 PM

I have a lot of it at home for my students but not so much here. I have a friend in Tucson who bought a bag from Milligan and Higgins and I get mine here from him.
I’ll PM you.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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