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Need a quick release attachment for a safety rail to add to a wood baby crib

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Forum topic by mjzraz posted 01-19-2018 03:25 AM 3301 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mjzraz

9 posts in 2652 days


01-19-2018 03:25 AM

Topic tags/keywords: crib safety

Wife and I have a 3 1/2 year old grandson we have custody of with a lot of medical issues and developmental delays. He just started pulling himself up to standing and I need a temporary safety rail for his crib so he doesn’t fall out. Because he is on a ventilator and oxygen, we need to make it able to be removed quickly in an emergency or when we need to access him. We have ordered a medical crib but it will take a few months to get it approved and delivered. It doesn’t have to be perfect – someone is with him 24/7 including home nursing.

I have some pictures showing the crib and sort of what I am thinking. The crib is a nice older wood construction unit that has a flat section at the top of the “headboadrd” and “footboard” where I was planning to attach the rail. I would probably make the rail out of a maple 1×2 and round over the edges to make it safer for him. To narrow the gap between this added safety rail and the top of the actual side rail I might add another 1×2 underneath (pic below)

The big question I have is what hardware options are there to attach it so it can be removed easily? I was thinking some type of t handle with a button on top like this:
 photo T-Handle Ball Lock Pin_zpsabc67yet.jpg
They are pretty expensive and I feel like they would need a metal sleeve to insert into because wood probably won’t hold the ball detents. I’m drawing a blank on other options

The only other idea I had was a 1/2” wood dowel with a 1” dowel “handle” as pins that go into holes in the headboard and footboard or maybe something with those really strong rare earth magnets?.

 photo FullSizeRender_zpsmwfbdedq.jpg

 photo FullSizeRender 2_zpsqwk9gscu.jpg

The 1×2 would lay flat like this:
 photo IMG_6020_zpsuqk99l8g.jpg

The 1×2 underneath to fill in the gap would be vertical kind of like this:
 photo IMG_6022_zpsgdkpnmbr.png
Even without the vertical 1×2 He can’t fit through there, but I also don’t want him getting his head stuck. The vertical 1×2 makes it not possible to fit his head in there so I think it will be safe for him.


11 replies so far

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wuddoc

272 posts in 3715 days


#1 posted 01-19-2018 04:04 AM

When I get stuck and need an idea on a fastener I go to McMaster-Carr and not only check their internet site but flip through their 3,800 page catalog.

https://www.mcmaster.com

-- Wuddoc

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mjzraz

9 posts in 2652 days


#2 posted 01-19-2018 04:39 AM



When I get stuck and need an idea on a fastener I go to McMaster-Carr and not only check their internet site but flip through their 3,800 page catalog.

https://www.mcmaster.com

- wuddoc

Thanks – So much hardware – something like this might work with a dowel pin going into a hole to keep the rail from sliding and the draw latch to hold it down: https://www.mcmaster.com/#1344a25/=1b6th3m

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bilyo

216 posts in 1099 days


#3 posted 01-19-2018 03:05 PM

The first thing that comes to mind is whether the mattress brackets could be lowered so that the distance between the mattress and existing top rail is greater. This might accomplish the desired purpose without the additional rail you propose. Maybe the same can be accomplished by moving the mounting points of the vertical slides upward. Be sure none of this interferes with the catch mechanism.

For the added top bar, I like the “T” shape. It adds stiffness. For mounting, the first thing that comes to mind is a pair of loose pin door hinges. Put the top of the “T” where ever you like. Then make the leg of the “T” long enough to lay against the inside face of the bed leg. Mount a hinge at each end as if the top bar you are installing was an inset door. Now, you can pull the pin on one end and swing the bar aside on the other hinge. Or, remove both pins. This will work better if you replace the pins with a slightly smaller diameter rod with an “L” bent into the top for easier grabbing and removing.

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dhazelton

2767 posts in 2294 days


#4 posted 01-19-2018 03:51 PM

A. Good on you for taking on a huge challenge and making a good home for your grandson!

B. That piece of hardware you linked to looks like the type of thing that held the hood down on my Jeep and the spring inside it was so strong that two hands were required to use it. I’d call and ask how much effort would be required to pull it open.

C. I was thinking maybe something that slipped OVER the top of the rails. It could be 3 sections and you’d have to just lift off the center section to access the crib – or you could do something where the center section is hinged and flips down, just kept up in place with a barrel bolt for quick access. You might want to pad the rail as well as it looks like it might be chin height.

Good luck.

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mjzraz

9 posts in 2652 days


#5 posted 01-19-2018 05:18 PM



The first thing that comes to mind is whether the mattress brackets could be lowered so that the distance between the mattress and existing top rail is greater. This might accomplish the desired purpose without the additional rail you propose. Maybe the same can be accomplished by moving the mounting points of the vertical slides upward. Be sure none of this interferes with the catch mechanism.

There is one lower setting we could use already for the mattress and I have considered it. The issues that result are that it is more difficult for the home nurse to do cares for him. She is already having some difficulty in the current position which I lowered him to a few months ago. I mean sure safety of not falling is more important and I have that option if I can’t easily add a rail.

For the added top bar, I like the “T” shape. It adds stiffness. For mounting, the first thing that comes to mind is a pair of loose pin door hinges. Put the top of the “T” where ever you like. Then make the leg of the “T” long enough to lay against the inside face of the bed leg. Mount a hinge at each end as if the top bar you are installing was an inset door. Now, you can pull the pin on one end and swing the bar aside on the other hinge. Or, remove both pins. This will work better if you replace the pins with a slightly smaller diameter rod with an “L” bent into the top for easier grabbing and removing.
- bilyo

I think something like this might work. I had to think about it and re-read it a few times before I understood.

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bilyo

216 posts in 1099 days


#6 posted 01-19-2018 06:05 PM


I think something like this might work. I had to think about it and re-read it a few times before I understood.
- mjzraz

I’ll be happy to clarify anything that’s confusing.


or you could do something where the center section is hinged and flips down, just kept up in place with a barrel bolt for quick access.

This is also a good idea. Using this concept, I would hinge a single board to the existing top rail and “latch” it to the two corner posts (legs) with surface bolts or barrel bolts. With the bolts opened, the top board would then fold down and would also slide down with the side gate if it is released. A light weight spruce (white wood) board from the home center would work fine.

This idea would also serve the purpose of making the whole side more secure when the bolts are in place. The original gate latches at the bottom are rather flimsy at best.

Best wishes.

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mjzraz

9 posts in 2652 days


#7 posted 01-19-2018 06:11 PM


A. Good on you for taking on a huge challenge and making a good home for your grandson!

B. That piece of hardware you linked to looks like the type of thing that held the hood down on my Jeep and the spring inside it was so strong that two hands were required to use it. I d call and ask how much effort would be required to pull it open.

C. I was thinking maybe something that slipped OVER the top of the rails. It could be 3 sections and you d have to just lift off the center section to access the crib – or you could do something where the center section is hinged and flips down, just kept up in place with a barrel bolt for quick access. You might want to pad the rail as well as it looks like it might be chin height.

Good luck.

- dhazelton


Good idea. I hadn’t thought of that, but that might work. For quick access it might be out of the way enough when the side rail is lowered to access him. Then it could be removed when not needed. It also limits the modifications to be non-permanent depending on the attachment.

Thanks for the encouragement – it’s been a long road. He was in the hospital for 27 months from birth. His father passed away 2 years ago and his mother, our daughter, 24 passed away 3 weeks ago on Christmas day. http://www.williamthewarrior.com/p/williams-story-so-f.html

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dhazelton

2767 posts in 2294 days


#8 posted 01-19-2018 09:00 PM

Wow – what a heartbreaking story. But what a trooper he is! I need to bookmark that page so whenever I feel sorry for myself I can read it and remind myself how fortunate I am. Cheers!

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mjzraz

9 posts in 2652 days


#9 posted 01-19-2018 10:19 PM



Wow – what a heartbreaking story. But what a trooper he is! I need to bookmark that page so whenever I feel sorry for myself I can read it and remind myself how fortunate I am. Cheers!

- dhazelton


The lesson I learned in the years in the hospital was about perspective. There were kids that seemed to have very poor quality lives to people like me that had never been in that world. I would fell so bad for them or their parents but the reality from their perspective was many times much different. A kid that can’t talk or move might not seem like much but those parents had been told they would never survive being born or never be able to communicate and they find ways to do so. For us we had to keep looking forward for the years to come in order to survive the day to day in the hospital which was not looking good. Today we still have a long ways to go but he is truly one of the happiest kids I know. We are constantly making forward progress and require less support. I would not trade him for anything.

This picture represents his personality:
 photo 26165987_10154890823036090_7952772968998883388_n_zpsfgo9i33o.jpg

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simoncpj

21 posts in 509 days


#10 posted 01-19-2018 10:35 PM

Good for you. Kiddos like him give higher highs along with the lower lows.

As an idea for raising the height of the side, did you consider using a t-bolt that would just need to be rotated 90 degrees to pull from the hole? It might work unless your grandson has designs on intentional escape.

You might consider attaching the crossbar to the top of the existing crib crossbar (the one that slides up and down). You could make the ends and a middle support with a slot that goes round the top of the existing crossbar, put the t-bolts through that and resting on the top of the existing bar. That would allow you to lift it off completely if needed or just let it drop down onto the existing crossbar.

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dhazelton

2767 posts in 2294 days


#11 posted 01-20-2018 02:49 PM

^ GREAT picture!! ^

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