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Burning Hard wood while resawing

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Forum topic by SJThrasher posted 01-18-2018 10:47 PM 715 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SJThrasher

31 posts in 1285 days


01-18-2018 10:47 PM

I have a large piece of Rose wood. It is very hard, very heavy, and way too thick (current dimensions approximately 16”L, 10”W, 5”D) Based on some reviews I saw here, I picked up a Timber Wolf 3/4” 3TPI blade. I wiped the blade down with Pam (per their directions) and made it through all but the last 1/8” or so of the first pass when the blade started smoking. When I tried to make another pass the blade instantly started smoking. I replaced the blade, assuming I had dulled it. I then cut a few pieces of pine driftwood with it before attempting the resaw process again. As before, as soon as I start cutting, the blade is smoking.

I’m new to resawing, but not to woodwork. My feed rate was extremely slow because I wanted to make sure the blade was adequately sweeping out the chips. I’m really frustrated because I know this wood will make some incredible projects. I would appreciate any tips as I’m obviously doing something wrong here.

BTW, this is a JET 14” with the riser block.


16 replies so far

View Mark's profile

Mark

911 posts in 1969 days


#1 posted 01-18-2018 11:02 PM

I assume yer resawing the 10” side. Not real sure, but it seems if your cutting slow, in very hard wood, I would think that would produce a fair bit of friction. Now add that to some thing like Pam cooking spray and that may be the source of the smoke. JMTCW.

-- Mark

View Lee's profile

Lee

113 posts in 872 days


#2 posted 01-18-2018 11:46 PM

Are you using a tall aux fence at least as high as the work piece? It sounds like your pushing the wood into the side of the blade. with the right set up the body of the blade wont touch ether side of the wood, the set of the teeth will make a wider cut than the blade is thick. dont push the wood so hard into the fence, just a slight pressure is all thats needed, and only in front of the blade never behind it. hope this helps and good luck.

-- Colombia Custom woodworking

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2910 posts in 2167 days


#3 posted 01-19-2018 12:21 AM

Blade is dull. Jet 14 has piece of metal under lower guides that can hit 3\4 blade if guides out of adjustment just slightly. Knocks the tip off the teeth . DAMHIKT

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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shipwright

7980 posts in 2792 days


#4 posted 01-19-2018 12:36 AM

If I’m resawing really hard wood, (particularly really valuable, really hard wood) I use a Lennox Trimaster carbide blade. They aren’t cheap but you would not want to damage a piece of wood that valuable and rare.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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TheFridge

9444 posts in 1480 days


#5 posted 01-19-2018 12:58 AM

3/4 is too big for a riser. I wouldn’t put it on one without either.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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SJThrasher

31 posts in 1285 days


#6 posted 01-19-2018 03:25 PM

Thanks for all of the answers. I didn’t think to thoroughly check the fence. I will check out videos on proper setup. As for the Pam smoking, that may add to it, but it’s not the primary source. I’ll check out the Lennox blade. Fridge, not sure what you mean. The saw is designed for this size blade, the blade is under proper tension, the blade does not wander, and a longer blade means more heat dissipation.

View JayT's profile

JayT

5621 posts in 2205 days


#7 posted 01-19-2018 04:11 PM

What Fridge is referring to is that while most cast iron framed 14in bandsaws will say they can use a 3/4in blade, the amount of tension needed is at the very top edge of the saws’ capabilities and construction, including guide adjustment. Add in a bit less rigidity due the riser block and it’s really straining. Most people with 14in saws are better served using a 1/2in resaw blade. With proper set up, it will provide just as good of results and be easier on the saw.

All that said, if it is working for you, have at it. When it’s time to replace the blade, you might consider trying a 1/2 or 5/8 blade and see which gives better performance.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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TheFridge

9444 posts in 1480 days


#8 posted 01-19-2018 04:40 PM

Ditto.


Blade is dull. Jet 14 has piece of metal under lower guides that can hit 3 blade if guides out of adjustment just slightly. Knocks the tip off the teeth . DAMHIKT

- johnstoneb

I’d double check with this too.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View BandsawJeff's profile

BandsawJeff

51 posts in 195 days


#9 posted 01-20-2018 12:29 PM



Are you using a tall aux fence at least as high as the work piece? It sounds like your pushing the wood into the side of the blade. with the right set up the body of the blade wont touch ether side of the wood, the set of the teeth will make a wider cut than the blade is thick. dont push the wood so hard into the fence, just a slight pressure is all thats needed, and only in front of the blade never behind it. hope this helps and good luck.

- Lee

+1 on binding the blade! You may consider the explanation in this video…really opened my eyes when it came to bandsaw setup.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=4k-r5utmU2Q

View jonah's profile

jonah

1695 posts in 3293 days


#10 posted 01-20-2018 12:44 PM

My Taiwan made 14” bandsaw (identical to the Jet) can technically use a 3/4” blade, but when I tried one, I realized the guides and wheels really aren’t designed to properly put the center of the wheel right behind the gullets on the blade. They’re just too thin and too close to the outside case to do that.

Try a 1/2” or 5/8” blade.

View pontic's profile

pontic

582 posts in 603 days


#11 posted 01-20-2018 12:53 PM

Anyone ever tried an air jet in frond of the blade to remove chips quicker and cool the blade as well? Assuming all of the above are addressed this really speeds up the cutting process.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

View SJThrasher's profile

SJThrasher

31 posts in 1285 days


#12 posted 01-20-2018 03:10 PM

Thanks again for all of the replies. On the dull blade, I totally agree, I think it was the driftwood not a matter of the bade hitting any part of the saw, as I had thoroughly checked that first because of the issues with the first blade. There were a few pebbles in the burl and even one 1/8” one that I sawed right through.

Great tips on the riser block and rigidity. Because I need a new blade and because I generally do not do a lot of large resawing, I’ll try out at least a 5/8” if not the 1/2”.

I checked out the video. Great product, and some great information about blade binding.

By the way, interesting thing is that I can still cut other woods with the existing blade with no burning. I even cut 1” off of the next piece of driftwood with no issues at all so I know a lot of my problem is the hardness. There is a local guy who advertises resawing services. For this one piece of Rose wood, I may just go with the pro. Then it’s off to the next slab, a slightly softer piece of Koa that I’ve had on my shelf for over 10 years.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1175 posts in 2755 days


#13 posted 01-20-2018 05:55 PM

If all else fails, try making multiple passes taking light cuts and raising the blade some on each pass. Taking one full pass all the way through the wood really heats up the blade!

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View JBrow's profile

JBrow

1354 posts in 914 days


#14 posted 01-21-2018 02:23 AM

SJThrasher,

I have not tried this method of re-sawing, but it might solve your problem. In summary the method starts with the table saw where the table saw blade creates an initial kerf. A ripping blade in the table saw would likely produce the best results. Multiple passes of increasing depth of cut could produce less burning.

After the table saw kerf is created, there is less material for the bandsaw to cut so the cut should be easier with less heat.

The technique can be seen from 18:36 to 20:10 in the video…

http://tommymac.us/2015/08/episode-0606-tv-tray-with-jesse-shaw/

View NoSpace's profile

NoSpace

120 posts in 1235 days


#15 posted 01-21-2018 03:21 AM

Assuming you don’t have issues with resawing say, maple, with a new blade, thus the setup should be okay, I’d take the plunge and get the 1/2” Lennox Trimaster that was recommended. I have that on my 1412. Not cheap, but it solved every problem I had, including 35$ blades dulling after 5 minutes cutting exotics. I re-sawed 6” Rosewood recently, no problem, but that stuff is extremely hard and at 10”, just thinking about how long my other blades lasted resawing 8” of maple, and a couple of passes sounds about right.

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