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Polyurethane/Oil Stain compatibility

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Forum topic by dbw posted 01-16-2018 05:05 PM 334 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dbw

197 posts in 1540 days


01-16-2018 05:05 PM

Topic tags/keywords: stain polyurethane diluting

I’m curious as to why Polyurethane is “lifting” some of the oil based stain. I stained a piece of cherry wood with GF warm cherry stain. I let it dry for 48 hours @ 75 degrees and 50ish humidity. I wiped on Minwax gloss poly with a cotton rag and some of the stain came off onto the rag. This process gave the stain a brownish tint. Am I doing something wrong or is this normal?

-- measure 3 times, cut once


9 replies so far

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

364 posts in 1435 days


#1 posted 01-16-2018 05:14 PM

I have had the same problem, I always views that as par for the course. Maybe I am wrong too. In my experience the only way to prevent it is to spray on the finish. I have had the same diluting of the stain in both brushing and wiping finish applications. The second coat goes on without additional problems.

You might also look here, same problem
http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthread.php?138651-Brushing-on-poly-but-the-stain-comes-off-on-the-brush

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

125 posts in 1006 days


#2 posted 01-20-2018 11:08 PM

I’ve also had this happen. Usually, when it does, it is because I didn’t wipe the excess stain off thoroughly enough after letting it penetrate as directed. I have done this intentionally a few times in order to get the color as dark as I want it. Having done this I will then flow on or spray on a coat of shellac to stabilize the stain and then continue with the finish I want.

I assume the “brownish tint” is not something you wanted. I don’t think this is related. Most stains will look somewhat different after applying a coat of finish. It is best to test it first.

View Imakenicefirewood's profile

Imakenicefirewood

73 posts in 1260 days


#3 posted 01-21-2018 01:30 AM

A good way to help prevent this is to seal the piece after the stain is dry. An oil-based sanding sealer or a de-waxed shellac have worked well for me.

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NoSpace

120 posts in 1144 days


#4 posted 01-21-2018 02:30 AM

right, on two things, I don’t use stains anymore but back when I did, really got to wipe off the excess and that stuff takes forever to dry. Then, as said, spray one coat of canned shellac from HD (making it easy) to seal, sand it and then poly is good.

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dbw

197 posts in 1540 days


#5 posted 01-21-2018 05:40 PM

Y’all were correct. I waited 15 minutes and then I wiped off the excess stain. No more transfer. I think 15 minutes was a bit too long because very little stain wiped off and the color is very deep.

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1683 posts in 1291 days


#6 posted 01-21-2018 06:13 PM

Not sure about the GF oil based stains but you might want to try really buffing or burnishing the stain with a coarse shop rag before applying the topcoats. You want to buff vigorously enough that you get just a slight warming effect. This will help both remove any stain not bound to the wood and the warmth may help speed the drying/curing of the stain.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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dbw

197 posts in 1540 days


#7 posted 01-21-2018 07:13 PM

Will a micro fiber rag work as a burnishing rag? I received 25 of them for Xmas.

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View Rick's profile

Rick

8899 posts in 2937 days


#8 posted 01-22-2018 05:31 PM

NO, it’s not normal. The stain was not dry enough and the Poly lifted or mixed with it.

I usually give the stain 24 hours to dry, it’s been Brushed in well. if I sense it’s not completely dry I’ll Burnish it with a clean rag and allow a bit more drying time.

I use a water based Poly on top. No problems at all Unless it’s NOT dry. Then you have a problem!

-- I Take My Kids Everywhere! The Problem Is, They Keep Finding Their Way Back Home! (Rick, Ontario, Canada)

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1683 posts in 1291 days


#9 posted 01-23-2018 01:15 AM


Will a micro fiber rag work as a burnishing rag? I received 25 of them for Xmas.

- dbw

Probably not the best choice because they are fairly smooth but any rag will work. I find that a coarser weave sort acts like a very fine sandpaper but without removing any wood so you don’t have to worry about sanding through the stain. I usually use shop towels I find in the Home Depot paint department.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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