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Minimum thickness for end grain cutting board?

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Forum topic by Jimothy posted 01-16-2018 03:21 AM 4518 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jimothy

22 posts in 1118 days


01-16-2018 03:21 AM

Topic tags/keywords: cutting board end grain thickness

Hey everyone. So I’ve run into a potential issue. I made an end grain cutting board using maple and walnut and my pieces unfortunately very poorly during the glue up. After getting my board planed to the lowest points, It ended up only being 7/8” or 15/16” thick. Do you think it will still be stable enough to be washed/absorb moisture without breaking? I was going to give this to someone, and I’m unsure if I should just make another one.

Thanks!


14 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

1813 posts in 1976 days


#1 posted 01-16-2018 03:33 AM

Sounds too thin to me unless it’s only a 3×3 square or the size of a drink coaster. I always shoot for 2 inches on my end grain boards.
Save that one for your self and see how it does

-- Aj

View msinc's profile

msinc

566 posts in 681 days


#2 posted 01-16-2018 05:48 AM

Well, you could always inlay it into another board. I routinely make “cheese and cracker” cutting boards on my lathe with an end grain inlay in the center…rarely is the end grain inlay over 1/2” thick. This one is white oak end grain set in cherry.

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Jimothy

22 posts in 1118 days


#3 posted 01-16-2018 06:03 AM

Hello, If I was going to make something to inlay it into I would just make another one completely. What do you think though? is 7/8 likely to warp?

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4664 posts in 2487 days


#4 posted 01-16-2018 07:00 AM

At this point why not just use it and see how it does.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 769 days


#5 posted 01-16-2018 11:42 AM

If you combine all answers in this post you will get an advice to cut your board into smaller pieces , which makes excellent beer coasters.

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Jimothy

22 posts in 1118 days


#6 posted 01-18-2018 12:05 AM

Damn, so nobody has any experience with end grain cutting boards ~7/8”~ thick not breaking over time? What’s the thinnest you’ve gone ?

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1452 posts in 341 days


#7 posted 01-18-2018 12:13 AM

if you do the google search for “end grain cutting boards” you will find thicknesses are all over the map.
I see that 1-1/4” being the thinnest.

https://www.cuttingboard.com/end-grain/

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4664 posts in 2487 days


#8 posted 01-18-2018 12:15 AM



If you combine all answers in this post you will get an advice to cut your board into smaller pieces , which makes excellent beer coasters.

- Carloz


I don’t drink beer

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4664 posts in 2487 days


#9 posted 01-18-2018 12:20 AM



Hello, If I was going to make something to inlay it into I would just make another one completely. What do you think though? is 7/8 likely to warp?

- Jimothy

This is your big chance test 7/8 boards and report back to us. You have a chance to help thousands of woodworkers. Just use and you’ll be the first to know how it works out first hand. Then you can spread the word

In the mean time make another cutting board.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Tommy Evans's profile

Tommy Evans

148 posts in 2352 days


#10 posted 01-18-2018 12:21 AM

I made a cheese and cracker serving tray for my son a year ago. It was from WoodSmith plans and had a 6×9 inch end grain maple 3/4” thick. I may have made it a wee bit thicker, but no more than 7/8ths.

So far, so good.

peace, T

View sras's profile

sras

4924 posts in 3307 days


#11 posted 01-18-2018 02:03 AM

I just made an end grain board for our RV – it is 9×9 and 5/8” thick. I have no concerns given it is only 9×9.

I would go ahead and use yours. Hand wash/wipe down and see how long it lasts.

One of my earlier boards developed a split. I just cut it down to a smaller size. That would always be a future option for you.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View ppg677's profile

ppg677

203 posts in 1034 days


#12 posted 01-18-2018 02:16 AM

I bought an end-grain cutting board that is pretty thin—probably 5/8” or .75” thick. It lasted about 15 years of abuse before finally becoming unusable.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4664 posts in 2487 days


#13 posted 01-18-2018 03:17 AM

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/256897

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View dschlic1's profile

dschlic1

442 posts in 2147 days


#14 posted 01-18-2018 07:39 PM

I have a 6×6” board I made that is 1/2” thick. Going on five years of daily use…

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