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Forum topic by saddletramp posted 03-24-2011 02:39 PM 1192 views 1 time favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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saddletramp

994 posts in 1385 days


03-24-2011 02:39 PM

Way back in he dark ages when we still used pen and ink on vellum to create mechanical drawings I took a drafting class in high school so I can draw and read 2D plans after a fashion. I have used a 2D cad program in the past with some degree of success. I just downloaded skrtchup and have started going through the tutorials but before I get too far into this I have a question. While the idea of a 3D model in nice, I still find it much easier to read and follow a 2D drawing. Will sketchup convert the 3D model to a set of 2d plans?

-- ♫♪♪♫♫ Saddletramp, saddletramp, I'm as free as the breeze and I ride where I please, saddletramp ♪♪♪♫♪ ...... Bob W....NW Michigan (Traverse City area)


9 replies so far

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lew

10154 posts in 2502 days


#1 posted 03-24-2011 03:42 PM

You can turn off the perspective view. Then look at the traditional front side top rear views of your project. This simulates the 2D drawing.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View brtech's profile

brtech

712 posts in 1669 days


#2 posted 03-24-2011 09:44 PM

And you can output this view as a drawing, although what you often want to do is output a DXF, which is a feature you only get in the Pro version.

BTW, Google has a very generous student/educator program. You can get Pro for free in many circumstances if you are a student or a teacher.

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pete79

154 posts in 1887 days


#3 posted 03-24-2011 10:00 PM

Also – there are a couple buttons that you can add to the toolbar that are shortcut commands to “standard” views that you would get in 2D. I think there’s a front, top, side view at a minimum. This allows you to get to those views quickly rather than using the orbit function.

I was an AutoCAD guy for the longest time. I tried Sketchup and didn’t like it. I went back to it a year or so later and now i really like it. Give it a chance.

-- Life is a one lap race.

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dbhost

5387 posts in 1979 days


#4 posted 03-24-2011 10:29 PM

While I agree with you, traditional 2D plans are great, and extremely useful, I find it equally useful to be able to rotate and manipulate an object / plan in 3D space, to pick it up and look at it all the way around as it were…. Even with the pen and ink days stuff, there were still 3D renderings of objects as I recall from my mechanical drawing classes from high school and college. I doubt they teach that stuff any more…

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

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Mike

18 posts in 1741 days


#5 posted 03-24-2011 11:12 PM

While I certainly do not qualify as a guru, I have used Sketch Up quite a bit. As a former machinist I too, wish there was a blue print out put but you can add the the dimensions via the tool. To me the biggest asset of the program is the ability to view the scale of the project. Do the stringers look too big? Too long? Being able to see the part in scale makes a huge difference to a beginner/dummy like myself.

As a person who’s knowledge of drafting is limited to race cars, sketch up is invaluable. Give it a go you might find it gives you something you didn’t know you were missing. Just be patient, complete the tutorials (they help a lot) and good luck.

Mike

-- Why measure twice when you can cut twice.

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saddletramp

994 posts in 1385 days


#6 posted 03-25-2011 02:02 AM

Gentlemen, thank you for your responses. I believe hat I will continue to try to strugle through the tutorials. The eventual rewards should out weigh he pain. ;-D

-- ♫♪♪♫♫ Saddletramp, saddletramp, I'm as free as the breeze and I ride where I please, saddletramp ♪♪♪♫♪ ...... Bob W....NW Michigan (Traverse City area)

View Philip's profile

Philip

16 posts in 1580 days


#7 posted 03-25-2011 02:42 AM

I found the free tutorials on http://sketchupforwoodworkers.com/ very useful. I was lost the first time I tried sketchup and gave up. I saw the link for the above tutorials on the wood whispers podcast and tried them. They really helped out.

-- If it was easy, anybody could do it.

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saddletramp

994 posts in 1385 days


#8 posted 03-25-2011 02:50 AM

Philip, thanks for the link, I’ll try it when I finish the regular sketchup tutorials.

-- ♫♪♪♫♫ Saddletramp, saddletramp, I'm as free as the breeze and I ride where I please, saddletramp ♪♪♪♫♪ ...... Bob W....NW Michigan (Traverse City area)

View lew's profile

lew

10154 posts in 2502 days


#9 posted 03-26-2011 05:00 PM

http://www.srww.com/google-sketchup.htm

http://sketchupforwoodworkers.com/

http://sketchupdate.blogspot.com/2009/03/woodworkers-3-sketchup.html

“The Missing Manual” series. The title is Google Sketchup. The ISBN number is 978-0-596-52146-2.

http://sites.google.com/site/lewiskauffman/shared-files- Betsy.PDF- Betsy.PDF

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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