LumberJocks

Vacuum controlled by saw switch

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by MalcolmLaurel posted 01-14-2018 02:08 AM 779 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View MalcolmLaurel's profile

MalcolmLaurel

298 posts in 1745 days


01-14-2018 02:08 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I’m picturing a device I want and wondering if it exists.

My shop vac sits next to my radial arm saw, and pulls dust from a collector behind the saw through a Thien separator into the vac. Works fine, but I have to turn on and off both the saw and the vacuum every time.

What I want is a way to turn on both the saw and vacuum with one switch. I could put a switch in a box and have two outlets, but I’d rather use the switch’s existing switch, which is conveniently located on the front of the arm. I could splice into the saw’s wiring to add an outlet for the vac, which is what I’ll probably do if I can’t find what I want, but what would be really nifty is a device I could plug into the wall with an outlet for the saw and the vac, which would sense the current draw from the saw and automatically turn on the vacuum. I could design such a device and it would be more elegant than cutting into the saw wiring, but I have enough projects as it is… surely I’m not the first person to think of this so one would think it’s available somewhere?

Anybody heard of and know where to get such a thing?

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com


15 replies so far

View jdh122's profile

jdh122

1035 posts in 2939 days


#1 posted 01-14-2018 02:13 AM

Like this?

http://www.grizzly.com/products/i-Socket-Autoswitch-15A-110V/T25759

-- Jeremy, in the Acadian forests

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1033 posts in 1661 days


#2 posted 01-14-2018 02:14 AM

This should do it. I have one to use on sanders.

DGC PRODUCTS i-Socket Autoswitch

View MalcolmLaurel's profile

MalcolmLaurel

298 posts in 1745 days


#3 posted 01-14-2018 02:16 AM

Perfect! Exactly what I was looking for, I knew it had to be out there somewhere but didn’t know what to search for.

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com

View Psavage1's profile

Psavage1

3 posts in 255 days


#4 posted 01-14-2018 02:17 AM

This will do what you are looking for.

View wuddoc's profile

wuddoc

311 posts in 3840 days


#5 posted 01-14-2018 02:23 AM

Look at this website.

http://dgcproducts.com/

Grizzly and Amazon sell this unit and most likely other vendors.

-- Wuddoc

View MalcolmLaurel's profile

MalcolmLaurel

298 posts in 1745 days


#6 posted 01-14-2018 02:52 AM

Just ordered the DGC switch from Amazon.

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com

View toolie's profile

toolie

2143 posts in 2750 days


#7 posted 01-14-2018 03:42 PM



Just ordered the DGC switch from Amazon.

- MalcolmLaurel

When that switch ceases to deliver the desired performance, the Ivac will be the first, and last, switch of that type you will need. Great products from a great company.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10141 posts in 1608 days


#8 posted 01-14-2018 05:30 PM

I use a current switch to power a contactor for my dust collector. As long as you have the basic function there are many ways to expand it.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View SweetTea's profile

SweetTea

353 posts in 782 days


#9 posted 01-15-2018 11:28 AM

Would the dust collector and the table saw not have to be on the same circuit for this device to work since it just plugs into one outlet? My concern would be tripping the breaker with both the dust collector and the table saw on the same circuit.

I have to keep my table saw and dust collector on different circuits because if I try and run both at the same time on one receptical the breaker trips about 40% of the time, and not on startup. This circuit only has one receptical and the wire is 12/2 with a 15a receptical.

My Craftsman 351.221160 cabinet saw is a 110v 15a machine, as is my Harbor Freight dust collector that I use with it. I am sure that if these were 220v machines I might not have this issue as I could then run a 20amp breaker. Does anyone know if my Craftsman 351.221160 cabinet saw and my HF dust collector can be required for 220?

View MalcolmLaurel's profile

MalcolmLaurel

298 posts in 1745 days


#10 posted 01-15-2018 11:37 AM



Would the dust collector and the table saw not have to be on the same circuit for this device to work since it just plugs into one outlet? My concern would be tripping the breaker with both the dust collector and the table saw on the same circuit. I have to keep my table saw and dust collector on different circuits because if I try and run both at the same time on one receptical the breaker trips about 40% of the time, and not on startup. This circuit only has one receptical and the wire is 12/2 with a 15a receptical.

As supplied they would have to be on the same circuit. However, it would be fairly simple to use the device to operate a relay instead of operating the dust collector directly, with the relay switching a separate circuit. Or upgrade the receptacles on the circuit to 20A and put in a 20A breaker (12GA wire is good for 20A).

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1117 posts in 2074 days


#11 posted 01-15-2018 02:09 PM

I usually let the dust collector run a while after making a cut and turning the saw off. There is still dust to be had in the cabinet and ductwork. I don’t want to keep the saw running for safety reasons. Locating a separate switch for the dust collector near the saw switch is an alternative you might consider.

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1033 posts in 1661 days


#12 posted 01-15-2018 02:29 PM



Would the dust collector and the table saw not have to be on the same circuit for this device to work since it just plugs into one outlet? My concern would be tripping the breaker with both the dust collector and the table saw on the same circuit. I have to keep my table saw and dust collector on different circuits because if I try and run both at the same time on one receptical the breaker trips about 40% of the time, and not on startup. This circuit only has one receptical and the wire is 12/2 with a 15a receptical.

My Craftsman 351.221160 cabinet saw is a 110v 15a machine, as is my Harbor Freight dust collector that I use with it. I am sure that if these were 220v machines I might not have this issue as I could then run a 20amp breaker. Does anyone know if my Craftsman 351.221160 cabinet saw and my HF dust collector can be required for 220?

- SweetTea

Mu understanding of the DGC autoswitch is that it staggers the shop vac to allow your primary tool to run first and then turn on the shop vac so it wouldn’t trip the breaker. He’s not using a full size DC for this operation on the radial arm saw.

The autoswitch also stays on for a few more seconds to clear out the line.

View MalcolmLaurel's profile

MalcolmLaurel

298 posts in 1745 days


#13 posted 01-16-2018 12:04 AM

Got the DGC switch this morning, used it this evening. Works just fine, exactly what I needed. And yes, not a full size DC, just a shop vac sucking through a homemade separator.

-- Malcolm Laurel - http://MalcolmLaurel.com

View toolie's profile

toolie

2143 posts in 2750 days


#14 posted 01-19-2018 03:01 PM



Would the dust collector and the table saw not have to be on the same circuit for this device to work since it just plugs into one outlet? My concern would be tripping the breaker with both the dust collector and the table saw on the same circuit…...

One of the advantages if the Ivac switch is that the activating appliance (tool) and the dust collector can be on separate circuits.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View MinnesotaSteve's profile

MinnesotaSteve

54 posts in 1013 days


#15 posted 01-19-2018 03:48 PM

I bought one of the IVac switches some 6 years back, and I love it. The other nice thing about it is you can flip the switch to just turn on the vacuum by itself.

Also it leaves the vacuum running for a few seconds after you shut off the saw, to insure the hose is cleared of dust.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com