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Forum topic by DaddyZ posted 03-22-2011 05:53 PM 1054 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DaddyZ

2399 posts in 1691 days


03-22-2011 05:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planes plane refurbishing sharpening question tip

I just have to ask, When ever I see a plane in someone’s photo background is is always sitting on the sole. I would have thought planes should be turned on the side, so you don’t damage the Blade.

Am I right or is there some other reason to lay a plane on its sole?

Just Wondering ;)

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one


24 replies so far

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HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1565 days


#1 posted 03-22-2011 05:58 PM

Vanity! LOL!

Having run a knuckle across an exposed blade from a plane on its side, I would imagine that you could add that as another reason as well…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1344 days


#2 posted 03-22-2011 05:58 PM

If you see one in my pictures, it’s laziness. I know well not to place a plane on the sole but I do it anyway. I usually have a little piece of square 1/4” dowel that I prop the toe on but I’m not perfect!

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

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CharlieM1958

15695 posts in 2869 days


#3 posted 03-22-2011 05:58 PM

Well, I suppose one could retract the blade out of harms way between uses, and then it would be okay to rest it on its sole. I would also suppose that if you carefully rested the plane on a wood surface when it wasn’t in use you would not harm the blade. But otherwise, I’d have to think you are right.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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HorizontalMike

6938 posts in 1565 days


#4 posted 03-22-2011 06:17 PM

I like Al’s idea of using a scrap of wood/dowel to prop the plane up. I guess, in my situation, I could just lay them across my new fancy dancy tool trays in the center of my new workbench and accomplish the same thing. 8-)

But DaddyZ, you are correct in that we all need to pay more attention to this.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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Bertha

12951 posts in 1344 days


#5 posted 03-22-2011 06:25 PM

^LOL with Horizontal. Owners of fancy new workbenches are allowed this vanity. :)

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View DaddyZ's profile

DaddyZ

2399 posts in 1691 days


#6 posted 03-22-2011 06:48 PM

Sorry Mike Accidents Happen;)

Charlie – In a perfect world

LOL!!!

At least I’m Crazy but not to much !!!

-- Pat - Worker of Wood, Collector of Tools, Father of one

View whitewulf's profile

whitewulf

445 posts in 1588 days


#7 posted 03-26-2011 09:21 PM

I read somewhere???? that laying iron plane on side could possibly knock blade out of square!
I use a block(or small board) with felt impregnated with beeswax or oil to lay plane on depending whether wooden plane or iron.

-- "ButI'mMuchBetterNow"

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NBeener

4806 posts in 1825 days


#8 posted 03-26-2011 09:36 PM

Charlie wrote:

”Well, I suppose one could retract the blade out of harms way between uses, and then it would be okay to rest it on its sole.”

Ayup. That’s MY practice. I just pull the blade back after use.

I also don’t set it on anything that is harder than the sole. So … on my bench is okay. On my DP table is okay. On my cast iron jointer tables … not so much.

Building a “proper parking place” FOR a plane sounds like a pretty easy and effective fix. I’ll add it to my “Round Tuit” list—the one that … just gets longer and longer all the time :-)

-- -- Neil

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canadianchips

1831 posts in 1648 days


#9 posted 03-26-2011 10:02 PM

I think gently resting a plane on its sole, sitting on any wooden shelf is okay. Keep it waxed and keep it dry.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

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Grandpa

3127 posts in 1326 days


#10 posted 03-26-2011 11:03 PM

When I had Industrial Arts class in the 9th grade before many of the readers here were born, we were taught to lay the plane on its side. NEVER lay a pane on its sole or you risk the rath of the instructor. I always lay mine on its left side with the sharp edge away from me. I am right handed. If I were left handed I would do the opposite. This keeps the delicate edge from being damaged requiring sharpening and re-honing. Just the way we were taught. Might be like the mother teaching her daughter the proper way to bake a ham. The first thing you do is cut about 6 inches off the small end of the ham. The daughter asked why. The mother said because that is the way I was taught. Your grandmother always did it that way. The granddaughter thought about it and went to see the grandmother to ask why. When she asked, the grandmother said I always did it this way because my roaster pan was too short. I am not sure why your mother does it that way!!!!!

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Chelios

567 posts in 1717 days


#11 posted 03-26-2011 11:47 PM

I don’t see how anything could happen to the blade if you lay it on top of a wood surface like your workbench. I always do that, never had an issue. I think it is safer for both me and my planes. Remember you actually have to put some pressure and alignment for a plane to make a cut so unless the set up of the blade is way out of the sole, which in my case it never is then I don’t see a problem.

best

View Luke's profile

Luke

538 posts in 1945 days


#12 posted 03-26-2011 11:55 PM

ditto Chelios. Don’t put it on a metal or concrete surface obviously but wood, no problem. I’d be more worried about the wood surface you’re putting it on than the plane blade.

-- LAS, http://www.abettersign.com

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littlecope

2905 posts in 2153 days


#13 posted 03-27-2011 12:11 AM

I’ve always laid them on their side and, like DaddyZ, I wondered why others didn’t too…

-- Mike in Concord, NH---Unpleasant tasks are simply worthy challenges to improve skills.

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Paul C.

154 posts in 1896 days


#14 posted 03-27-2011 01:01 AM

I figure if it can stand the stress of my big body pushing it into hardwood, it can handle being placed on my workbench, sole down.

On my jointer, not so much…..

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poopiekat

3617 posts in 2385 days


#15 posted 03-27-2011 02:45 AM

Well I guess it’s up to me to ponder what Stanley’s instructions might have been, if asked about the care and storage of a #10 Rabbet. The blade protrudes on 2 sides as well as the sole. By habit I retract the cutters and store my planes upright on either wood or particle board surfaces.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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