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Saw Blades - Please Explain

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Forum topic by Marleywoodie posted 01-12-2018 12:16 PM 983 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marleywoodie

19 posts in 628 days


01-12-2018 12:16 PM

Hi folks,

So I have a chop saw that I use for primarily for making raised garden bed kits. I’m using WRC (Western Red Cedar), in 2×6 & 4×4, but I will use the saw for other projects. The blade on the left side of the photograph is what is on the saw now. It seems to need sharpening. On the left are 3 other blades that I got when I bought the saw (used).

The saw is a DeWalt DW715 12” Compound Miter Saw.

My question is, which of these blades are best for what I am doing (I’m assuming the one on the saw, as that’s what they guy I bought the saw was doing with it.) But what are the differences between these blades?

Sorry, I’m kind of a noob.

Thanks for any help.

Marleywood


19 replies so far

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 789 days


#1 posted 01-12-2018 12:45 PM

I assume these are 12” blades. ON the right:The red one is 44 tooth Freud Diablo general purpose should do the job well.
The other in the front seems to be a laminate cutting blade. It will give you smooth cuts on wood but is not the most efficient blade for that.
Not sure the model of the saw on the back but it should work for your purposes well too.

View dbw's profile

dbw

208 posts in 1835 days


#2 posted 01-12-2018 01:05 PM

I agree the Diablo will work well for what you are doing. The blade on the left appears to be rusty. If this is the case trash it.

-- measure 3 times, cut once

View Woodtodust's profile

Woodtodust

58 posts in 2035 days


#3 posted 01-12-2018 01:15 PM

Hard to say for sure that the blade on the left is rusty—the brown stuff may be pitch from the wood. If that’s the case then you can clean it. A general purpose blade with relatively large gullets (to clear the saw-dust) should work well. If I had to choose from the blades you are showing, the Diablo is probably the best.

-- Bill...Richmond Hill, GA--"83% of all statistics are made up."

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Marleywoodie

19 posts in 628 days


#4 posted 01-12-2018 01:28 PM



Hard to say for sure that the blade on the left is rusty—the brown stuff may be pitch from the wood. If that s the case then you can clean it.
- Woodtodust

Actually, that’s not rust, it’s residual yellow paint, apparently the blade was painted on the edge, much like the one on the top right.

View JayT's profile

JayT

5957 posts in 2409 days


#5 posted 01-12-2018 02:02 PM

The blade on the top right looks to be a DeWalt construction blade, probably the 60 tooth DW3126 by the tooth shape and spacing. The one on the left, if it had a painted yellow rim, would be another DeWalt construction blade. Both of those are designed for clean crosscuts in construction lumber. In general, higher tooth count means cleaner cut, while a lower tooth count will be a bit faster. Garden beds don’t need a super clean cut like when installing interior trim and moldings, so for what you are working on, the DeWalts and the Diablo would all work just fine, so pick whichever is the sharpest.

First thing I would do is clean the blades. Removing resin build up will help blade performance and you can’t know if the teeth are actually sharp until that resin is gone. If none are sharp after cleaning, all three appear to have enough carbide to be able to be sharpened once or twice. A reputable sharpening shop will let you know and be able to get them all sharp for far less than a single new blade.

The bottom right blade looks to be a high tooth count (100-120) blade intended for cutting laminates or plywood. Not the best choice for what you are doing.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

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Marleywoodie

19 posts in 628 days


#6 posted 01-12-2018 02:23 PM



The blade on the top right looks to be a DeWalt construction blade, probably the 60 tooth DW3126 by the tooth shape and spacing. The one on the left, if it had a painted yellow rim, would be another DeWalt construction blade. Both of those are designed for clean crosscuts in construction lumber. In general, higher tooth count means cleaner cut, while a lower tooth count will be a bit faster. Garden beds don t need a super clean cut like when installing interior trim and moldings, so for what you are working on, the DeWalts and the Diablo would all work just fine, so pick whichever is the sharpest.

- JayT

Now that you say that, the blade on the left (which is currently on the saw) has this etched into the side…

Based on your post, I thought perhaps this referenced a DeWalt 3416 blade, but I can’t find this model #. I presume the “80” is the tooth count?

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JayT

5957 posts in 2409 days


#7 posted 01-12-2018 02:36 PM

Yes on the tooth count. If it’s a DeWalt construction series, the tooth shape is consistent with their 80 tooth blades. 3416 is not a valid current DeWalt part # and I don’t find reference to it anywhere, the current 12×80 is model# DW3128. It’s possible that 3416 was a promo combo blade pack that included a couple different blades or the 3416 could also maybe be a purchase or sharpening date (3/4/16)

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View Steve's profile (online now)

Steve

733 posts in 780 days


#8 posted 01-12-2018 02:42 PM

I have the same MS and I would guess the top right was the one that comes with it standard.

You may try them out to see which one gives you the best cuts for the material you’re cutting. I have a Freud D1280X on mine currently. But I’d probably switch it out for a 40-60 tooth blade for the jobs you’re doing.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

2793 posts in 2495 days


#9 posted 01-12-2018 02:56 PM

I like Freud blades as well, good blade for the money. I agree with what a couple folks above said, you don’t need the most expensive 80 tooth blade to cut cedar. Save some money and go down a tooth count or two.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8516 posts in 2775 days


#10 posted 01-12-2018 03:08 PM

12 in. x 80 Tooth Finishing Circular Saw Blade

Ideal For: Fine finish crosscuts in Hardwoods & Softwoods. Chip free cuts in Veneered Plywood, Melamine, & MDF
Tool Use: Chop/Miter, Slide Miter
Materials: Wood Cutting

http://www.diablotools.com/products/product/D1280X

Clean the blades up once in a while as well.

View d38's profile

d38

108 posts in 460 days


#11 posted 01-12-2018 05:15 PM

Agree we don’t need a high tooth count for your application. 60 to 80 would work well.
If the Dewalt in upper right is sharp, it will work well. Same with the Diablo. If you can have it sharpened locally, even better.
If you’re looking for a new blade, consider Irwin Marples (made in Italy).
Member “knotscott” routinely says they are a very good blade for the price.

View Marleywoodie's profile

Marleywoodie

19 posts in 628 days


#12 posted 01-12-2018 05:30 PM



Agree we don t need a high tooth count for your application. 60 to 80 would work well.
If the Dewalt in upper right is sharp, it will work well. Same with the Diablo. If you can have it sharpened locally, even better.
If you re looking for a new blade, consider Irwin Marples (made in Italy).
Member “knotscott” routinely says they are a very good blade for the price.

- d38

I doubt any of them are “sharp”. I do have a good local guy who can sharpen them.

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Marleywoodie

19 posts in 628 days


#13 posted 01-16-2018 08:39 PM

Upon closer inspection, I noticed that the blade shown in the lower right hand side of my original picture is missing a tooth….I presume this renders the blade as garbage?

And, I also discovered another blade in my inventory, which has “Do not use on mitre saw” written on….Any guesses why this is the case?

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8146 posts in 3574 days


#14 posted 01-16-2018 09:01 PM

One tooth missing won’t help, but it shouldn’t render the blade useless unless there’s other damage. Test it and see.

That blade shown above has a positive hook angle, so isn’t recommended for a sliding miter saw, but it should be fine on a normal CMS.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1057 posts in 693 days


#15 posted 01-17-2018 12:53 AM

A good sharpener can replace a missing or chipped tooth no problem.

Miter saws produce the best cuts with a negative hook angle blade like the Forrest Chopmaster.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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