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Slab leveling with a router

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Forum topic by Andrew714 posted 01-11-2018 09:13 PM 357 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Andrew714

22 posts in 1245 days


01-11-2018 09:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router slab leveling

Hello,

I am working on leveling a maple slab with a router, and I have a question on which bit to use. Currently, I am using a 1.25” diameter bottom clearing bit, but I am really only able to cut approximately 1/16” depth at the full width of the bit without slowing the router motor down too much (I’m using a Bosch 1618).

My question is, would I be better off using a 2” bit, but only making half-width passes, or will that not make much of a difference? I have close to 2” of depth to remove in some areas as well, so to speed things up, I made a sled for my circular saw, and I’m making full depth cuts approximately every 1/4” or 3/8”, as that should lighten the load on the router a little more.

Thanks in advance!


4 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

727 posts in 132 days


#1 posted 01-11-2018 09:27 PM

(a) use a smaller diameter bit
(b) don’t bite off more than the router can chew
(c) find a router with more horse power

you said: “I’m making full depth cuts approximately every 1/4” or 3/8”,
as that should lighten the load on the router a little more”.

are you breaking out the chips with a hammer and chisel after the saw cuts ???
that alone will reduce the sludge that the router has to cut out.
no matter how big that elephant is – you can eat it all if you take small bites.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5106 posts in 1690 days


#2 posted 01-11-2018 09:33 PM

I would stick with the bit you have, a 2” bit will have higher edge speed but will require more torque to spin while plowing off the same amount of wood. The circular saw is a good idea if you can mount two blades side by side you can generate a double wide kerf but you probably shouldn’t do that because it would be dangerous.

View Andrew714's profile

Andrew714

22 posts in 1245 days


#3 posted 01-11-2018 09:52 PM



(a) use a smaller diameter bit
(b) don t bite off more than the router can chew
(c) find a router with more horse power

you said: “I’m making full depth cuts approximately every 1/4” or 3/8”,
as that should lighten the load on the router a little more”.

are you breaking out the chips with a hammer and chisel after the saw cuts ???
that alone will reduce the sludge that the router has to cut out.
no matter how big that elephant is – you can eat it all if you take small bites.

.

- John Smith

I don’t know why, but a hammer and chisel hadn’t occurred to me yet. That’ll be even quicker than routering the whole depth.


I would stick with the bit you have, a 2” bit will have higher edge speed but will require more torque to spin while plowing off the same amount of wood. The circular saw is a good idea if you can mount two blades side by side you can generate a double wide kerf but you probably shouldn t do that because it would be dangerous.

- bigblockyeti

That’s a good point, I’ll stick with the same bit.

Thanks for the responses, I think this will save me some time.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2728 posts in 1995 days


#4 posted 01-15-2018 01:05 AM

Your bottom cleaning bit should work best, in that it won’t leave grooves or ridges. The slow cutting your are experiencing may be due to trying to cut the full 1 1/4” in one pass. If you make each pass take off only half the width of the router bit (5/8” or a bit less), you may get better results.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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