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Picture frame miters????

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Forum topic by msinc posted 01-11-2018 01:08 AM 554 views 0 times favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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msinc

257 posts in 408 days


01-11-2018 01:08 AM

Would like to hear from you folks regarding your method to cut, for example 2” wide by 1/2” thick say maple or oak or whatever solid hard wood molding to use for picture frames. I have a nice home made tabletop style glue jig that works great. I would like to discover a method to positively cut good, usable, accurate miters that are smooth and go together right and look good when the frame is glued up. All this is within reason, I don’t expect absolute dead zero perfection, but they need to be right. It would be nice if the method was also relatively quick and easy.
A DeWalt power miter box is great for floor trim, but not really what I had in mind. I would like to be able to make the cut and easily see if I am right on the line or if I need to move it and take another pass to correct. I am thinking a jig to use on a nice cabinet saw with a good steady arbor and a top of the line blade???? I don’t know about and have never used or tried a “shooter board”, so that might be the ticket. I am not above trying anything and I understand that the molding stock has to be flat and straight or it wont matter what method to cut the miters, it wont go together good. Thanks in advance for any info, and as always it is greatly appreciated!!!

Edit: I have to wonder what the ladies at Michael’s or other various art and craft stores use to cut that pre-made molding you can pick from…it always looks pretty good to me when they do it. They don’t use glue, they use those staple things and call me crazy, but I am going out on a limb here and saying that something tells me they aren’t using a shooter board….....


26 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

440 posts in 67 days


#1 posted 01-11-2018 01:19 AM

no – the picture framing ladies are not using shooting boards or a chop saw.

back in the day when I was doing a lot of shadow boxes,
I invested in the miter trimmer (Moulding Guillotine).
it is as accurate and splinter free of any hand tool you will ever find.
drawbacks: a little on the pricey side and HEAVY (mine was all cast iron) and takes up
a lot of table space unless you hang it on the wall when not in use.
well worth the investment if you intend to do a lot of framing
and demand accuracy with every joint. the way it works is you rough cut
your molding 1/8” longer than needed then go to the Guillotine and shave off
right on the line. like a paper cutter cutting through poster board.
drop by your local picture frame shop and check it out.
this is probably another volatile subject with the “Nay Sayers” insisting
any jack or block plane, when correctly and accurately sharpened, will do the same thing.
this is just my personal choice for production work – one quick “swish” and it’s done.
first time – every time…... none of this cut/see if it fits – cut/see if it fits – cut/see if it fits, etc etc etc.
I don’t know what is on today’s market, but, the one I had would trim a pine 2×4 with 100% accuracy.

.

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msinc

257 posts in 408 days


#2 posted 01-11-2018 01:24 AM

Please forgive my ignorance/stupidity, but do you actually make the cut with this device or do you saw it close and shave off a thin final amount with this thing? Seems like forcing a blade thick enough to be stable thru a 2” wide piece of maple might cause it to want to not go straight {90 degrees} thru? Thanks for posting!!!

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Aj2

1272 posts in 1703 days


#3 posted 01-11-2018 01:45 AM

I use a 12 Forrest chopmaster on a Bosch glide.I can get very close depending on how well my wood is prepared.
I do have a Lie Neilson miter plane to tweak any joints the need it.
When I ordered the blade I let them know I would be cutting miters in 1 inch Hickory. Im not sure if that made a difference but the blade cut a very flat miter.
Jigs for clamping fasteners,glue that’s a whole new discussion that just as important.
Good luck miters can be very challenging

-- Aj

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 496 days


#4 posted 01-11-2018 01:48 AM

I just cut it on a table saw with Incra meter gauge. The latter must be setup ansolutely perfect as an error is multiplied 8 times . The last corner will not come together if you have more than 2-3 thousands on the length of one side imperfection

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John Smith

440 posts in 67 days


#5 posted 01-11-2018 01:50 AM

msinc – please read my post again.

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msinc

257 posts in 408 days


#6 posted 01-11-2018 03:37 AM



msinc – please read my post again.

- John Smith

Thank you sir…”a little on the pricey side”??? If it will cut real 45 degree miters I would pay $2000.00!!! Rockler has them on sale for $189.00.

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msinc

257 posts in 408 days


#7 posted 01-11-2018 03:39 AM



I just cut it on a table saw with Incra meter gauge. The latter must be setup ansolutely perfect as an error is multiplied 8 times . The last corner will not come together if you have more than 2-3 thousands on the length of one side imperfection

- Carloz

Thanks for the info, I just checked out their website…looks interesting. Also, I noticed that they were using it a lot on a bandsaw…I have a PM1500 and for no more than what this costs I think I might give it a try too.

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msinc

257 posts in 408 days


#8 posted 01-11-2018 03:41 AM



I use a 12 Forrest chopmaster on a Bosch glide.I can get very close depending on how well my wood is prepared.
I do have a Lie Neilson miter plane to tweak any joints the need it.
When I ordered the blade I let them know I would be cutting miters in 1 inch Hickory. Im not sure if that made a difference but the blade cut a very flat miter.
Jigs for clamping fasteners,glue that s a whole new discussion that just as important.
Good luck miters can be very challenging

- Aj2

Yes they can, thanks for the info. I will check out these suggestions. I am going to guess and say that the miter plane has to have a very sharp blade to work properly???

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

126 posts in 1149 days


#9 posted 01-11-2018 03:50 AM

It does not matter how accurate the miter cuts are if the opposing sides are not the EXACT same length.

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msinc

257 posts in 408 days


#10 posted 01-11-2018 04:11 AM



It does not matter how accurate the miter cuts are if the opposing sides are not the EXACT same length.

- oldwood

Yes sir, and I couldn’t agree more….that was part of my original post when I asked about “easy”. Easy to see exactly where the blade is going to cut. If it’s easy to see then I believe it will be easier to get the length right.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

440 posts in 67 days


#11 posted 01-11-2018 04:18 AM

msinc – don’t be shy about stopping into a picture frame place
and talk with them about their miter cutter.
I’m sure the older shops will have the vintage heavy cast iron cutter
and the newer shops will have the Grizzly or Rockler brands.

good luck with whatever you choose !!! photos of your projects would be interesting to see.

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woodbutcherbynight

3952 posts in 2314 days


#12 posted 01-11-2018 04:19 AM

I use this jig for my TS. Tight joints everytime as long as you follow the directions. Cut A always mates to cut B. Together cut A and cut B always equal exactly 90 degrees with no gaps. Several youtube how to videos on how to build. If you had the Moulding Guillotine you could fine tune any cut but thus far in the year I have had this jig I have yet to be disappointed with the joints made by it.
Here is a picture of mine:

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View ColonelTravis's profile

ColonelTravis

1744 posts in 1799 days


#13 posted 01-11-2018 05:57 AM

Moulding Guillotine is awesome.
I do use a shooting board and chop saw/bandsaw/dozuki saw – unlike the ladies. But I don’t do a lot of frames.

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msinc

257 posts in 408 days


#14 posted 01-11-2018 12:57 PM

Thanks for the replies fellas!!! Mr. Smith, I will get some photos posted soon. I am liking that TS jig, does it have guides to go in both of the T-slots in your table? I was kind envisioning something similar but only one side…the two sides make perfect sense. Is it easy to see where the cut will be? I don’t a lot of frames either, but when I do it is usually because what’s going in it is valuable and so I would prefer if it was as right as possible {I mean for a hillbilly like me}
Yeah, never used a molding guillotine, but I also think it has to be awesome…for no more than what it cost I have gotta have one!! I’d would very much like to find a good, used, older one that is heavy. Guess I better start watching the bay….thanks again guys!!!

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John Smith

440 posts in 67 days


#15 posted 01-11-2018 01:59 PM

the Moulding Guillotine at work: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LPJinTEesMg
some very good ideas tossed around here that will make your projects easier.

msinc – Pinterest is your friend !!! my daughter turned me onto it last year
and became quickly addicted to it over any other search engine.
search Pinterest for TABLE SAW SLED and you will be amazed at the ingenuity
of some of these guys making sleds and jigs that it will boggle your mind.
but again – a sled and jig is only as accurate as the skill level of the craftsman behind the wheel.
this will get you started:
https://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?rs=ac&len=2&q=table%20saw%20sled&eq=table%20saw%20sled&etslf=NaN&term_meta[]=table%7Cautocomplete%7Cundefined&term_meta[]=saw%7Cautocomplete%7Cundefined&term_meta[]=sled%7Cautocomplete%7Cundefined

Note: if the two track rails are not snug and true – nothing else matters.
you may as well go to the stock miter gauge that came with the saw.
the instructions are quite clear and precise on how to build the basic sled.
once you get the base made – the rest is limited only to your imagination.

,

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