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Shop on a Hypothetical Budget

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Forum topic by TimInIndiana posted 01-10-2018 01:44 AM 766 views 0 times favorited 49 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TimInIndiana

16 posts in 12 days


01-10-2018 01:44 AM

I’m new here; please accept my apologies if this has been asked before.

If you were given an empty 2-car garage with a budget of $2,500 to build a shop from scratch, what tools/brands/models would you buy?

What would you do differently if your budget was say $5,000 or even $10,000?

Realistically, I intend to start with a table saw and will add tools as I encounter projects that require them.

Thanks in advance for your comments!


49 replies so far

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Knockonit

218 posts in 74 days


#1 posted 01-10-2018 02:20 AM

Well thats a loaded question in my opinion.
might first decide type of project you will try to accomplish, list them, and then review tools that MAY be needed, as there are so many specialty tools available, one might find one tool can and will do many aspects of a project.

its not about the money, to buy as needed, its about the skill to use what you have and only buy that which is needed to increase your skill

jmo
and good luck with shop, if you find yourself with a few extra dugas, i’m sure a few folks here will take’m off yer hands.
Rj in az

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Monte Pittman

27688 posts in 2210 days


#2 posted 01-10-2018 02:23 AM

Welcome to Lumberjocks

First decide what you want to make, then decide how you will get there.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

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TimInIndiana

16 posts in 12 days


#3 posted 01-10-2018 02:27 AM

Thanks for the feedback. I’d like to work up to building furniture; on my short list is a nice chest of drawers.

But getting started, I’m interested in more attainable goals to pick up some skills. Cutting boards, coasters, boxes, you name it.

My wife really likes live edge slab stuff, so I expect something along those lines in near future.

One goal I have is to use rough cut lumber and dimension it myself for use in my projects.

I see myself as being more of a power tool type, but have great respect for hand tools and would enjoy to acquire and learn to properly use at least the basic ones!

Tomorrow I start an 8-week (meeting once a week) woodworking course that should give me a better feel for the tools and what type of work I’d like to get into.

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bigblockyeti

4885 posts in 1593 days


#4 posted 01-10-2018 02:31 AM

I would buy used: 1) cabinet saw $1000. 2) dust collector $300. 3) bench top planer $250. 4) 14” bandsaw $350. 5) 6” jointer $150. 6) 6” belt x 12” disc sander $450.

All of these are close to what I can easily find in my area given enough time. This also doesn’t include any hand held power tools like a drill, router or sanders + consumables.

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knotscott

7819 posts in 3248 days


#5 posted 01-10-2018 02:43 AM

It really depends on what you want to do. For furniture and general woodworking, I would start with a good full size TS, router, portable planer, 14” BS, DP, bench, palm sander, jack plane, block plane, and DC. Look to used where feasible, and add a jointer if you can.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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playingwithmywood

360 posts in 1469 days


#6 posted 01-10-2018 02:55 AM

14” bandsaw used maybe 500 to 700 used table saw used $500
a router DEWALT DW618PK $213
narex chisels 4 set $50
planer DeWALT DW735 Heavy-Duty 13’’ 600
floor drill press ridgid 429 home depot or a used drill press to save money
and then jointer I would bite the bullet for a 8” 750-1000 but if you buy a 6” buy it cheap knowing that you will probally grow out of it so you can sell and get your money back

simple if you look around and buy used you can get deal but it is not the big tools that really cost it is the little stuff you end up buying and then the cost of good wood to turn into saw dust later

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playingwithmywood

360 posts in 1469 days


#7 posted 01-10-2018 02:59 AM


14” bandsaw used maybe 500 to 700 used table saw used $500
a router DEWALT DW618PK $213
narex chisels 4 set $50
planer DeWALT DW735 Heavy-Duty 13 600
floor drill press ridgid 429 home depot or a used drill press to save money
and then jointer I would bite the bullet for a 8” 750-1000 but if you buy a 6” buy it cheap knowing that you will probally grow out of it so you can sell and get your money back

simple if you look around and buy used you can get deal but it is not the big tools that really cost it is the little stuff you end up buying and then the cost of good wood to turn into saw dust later

and speaking dust I would have bought a good cyclone dust collector to start with maybe Grizzly G0703 $1000 I did the harbor freight thing and then upgrade and upgraded it should have just started bigger and saved time and money

- playingwithmywood

oops please delete

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TungOil

801 posts in 367 days


#8 posted 01-10-2018 03:12 AM


Tomorrow I start an 8-week (meeting once a week) woodworking course that should give me a better feel for the tools and what type of work I d like to get into.

- TimInIndiana


Wait until after your class. You will have a much better idea of what you need then. Good tools can last a lifetime, don’t rush.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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SuperCubber

1015 posts in 2157 days


#9 posted 01-10-2018 03:33 AM

Wood Magazine ran a good series that you may be interested in. Idea Shop 6 takes you from no tools to a decently equipped shop. The setup may not be ideal for everyone, but it will probably help you make your decisions. Here is a link:

https://www.woodmagazine.com/workshop/idea-shop-6

-- Joe | Spartanburg, SC | "To give anything less than your best is to sacrafice the gift." - Steve Prefontaine

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jerkylips

342 posts in 2442 days


#10 posted 01-10-2018 04:35 AM

My budget IS hypothetical..

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Bluenote38

252 posts in 261 days


#11 posted 01-10-2018 11:49 AM



My budget IS hypothetical..

- jerkylips

ROFL… It’s only hypothetical because you have not started buying. Once the “Tool Bug” bites it’s hard to stop. And Playingwithmywood is right about two things. All the little things add up and go big in the dust collection up front. I didn’t either and have spent more in “upgrades” than if I just went out an bought a decent cyclone out of the gate. Go as big as you can then go $500 bigger. It will still be cheaper than the buying changing, fixing, upgrading, buying routine.

-- Bill - Rochester MI

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

1923 posts in 520 days


#12 posted 01-10-2018 11:51 AM

If I had a $10,000 budget, I would erect a $5000 building and equip it exactly as it is now … completely unplugged with roughly $250 of essential hand tools, $150 of supplies … and spend the remaining $4600 on lumber!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

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Fred Hargis

4827 posts in 2365 days


#13 posted 01-10-2018 12:08 PM

I like your plan just fine…I would start with a table saw and maybe a select group of hand tools, and go from there. One point that yeti made, it’s easy to overlook dust collection. After all, the machine does nothing directly to the wood, and it does cost some money. Yet I see it as extremely important; worthy of being very high on the “next to buy” list. So as you consider your subsequent purchases, keep that in mind.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Gilley23's profile

Gilley23

453 posts in 254 days


#14 posted 01-10-2018 12:22 PM

-Table saw
-Router with plunge and fixed base
-Clamps, lots and lots of clamps. You’ll need more than you think.
-Bench top disc/belt sander
-Drill press
-Misc straight edge/squaring tools
-5” random orbital sander
-Dust collection with cyclone, could be as simple as a shop vac to start. ; a remote on/off is SUPER handy to have, but you don’t need one of these fancy “remote vacuum starters”. Go to Lowe’s and pickup one in the electrical or seasonal isle for half the price.
-Flush cut Japanese saw.

Craigslist and patience is your friend, patience the best one. The deals will come by you if you can be patient and persistent. Retail/full price is for suckers.

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Firewood

190 posts in 1506 days


#15 posted 01-10-2018 01:17 PM

TimInIndiana, welcome to LJ. I’m with supercubber on reviewing the IdeaShop 6 article in Wood Magazine. Not only does it show how to build a shop on a budget over time, it also increases your skills through the various projects needed to build out the shop.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

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