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Another what to do with this piece of wood. butcher block countertop

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Forum topic by Steve posted 01-09-2018 08:04 PM 477 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Steve

419 posts in 604 days


01-09-2018 08:04 PM

I’ve had this in my garage for awhile and was trying to figure out what I could do with it? Can I cut it into strips and make end grain cutting boards out of it?

I don’t have the exact dimensions on it right now, but I’d say it’s around 30” x 30”


14 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 185 days


#1 posted 01-09-2018 08:33 PM

of course you can !! photos of your finished project would be interesting to see.

I would suggest sanding down to 80 grit on both sides to get the best adhesion
and you can use whatever length pattern you choose. if I were doing it, I would
figure out how many cubic inches you have in that board.
then decide how thick you want it
that will give you the overall square inches that you will be able to cut.
you don’t to do the standard square pegs or strip type board.
the design is limited only by your imagination.
Pinterest can give you hundreds of good ideas on cutting board design.
https://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=Butcher%20Block%20Cutting%20Board%20design&rs=typed&term_meta[]=Butcher%7Ctyped&term_meta[]=Block%7Ctyped&term_meta[]=Cutting%7Ctyped&term_meta[]=Board%7Ctyped&term_meta[]=design%7Ctyped

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View Steve's profile

Steve

419 posts in 604 days


#2 posted 01-09-2018 09:00 PM



of course you can !! photos of your finished project would be interesting to see.

I would suggest sanding down to 80 grit on both sides to get the best adhesion

- John Smith


So sand the top and bottom first, then cut the strips?

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

17421 posts in 3028 days


#3 posted 01-09-2018 09:04 PM

Sharpening station.

-- Its not a crack, its a casting imperfection.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 185 days


#4 posted 01-09-2018 09:05 PM

the glue surfaces should get a good sanding – especially if there is any kind
of finish on the former show (customer use) side. If it was a counter top in its former life,
there is no telling what it is on it . . . so you must remove or at least abrade
all gluing surfaces prior to cutting into strips.

do you know the history of the panel ???

after enlarging your photo – I see it has an edge strip – - – -
are you sure this panel is solid wood strips and not a comopisite material with the wood edge ??

.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1020 posts in 931 days


#5 posted 01-09-2018 09:12 PM

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Steve's profile

Steve

419 posts in 604 days


#6 posted 01-09-2018 09:21 PM

It came out of a kitchen remodel that a friend had done. He gave me his old cabinets and this small piece from the counter. I believe it was a small piece maybe between the stove and refrigerator?

I’m pretty sure it’s all wood as it’s fairly heavy. Plus, it looks like there’s a few spots where the strips are starting to separate.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 185 days


#7 posted 01-09-2018 09:41 PM

if it was beside the stove – it may have several years of cooking grease spatter on it.
this would be a good candidate to cut off a piece of the end and experiment first
prior to fabricating a whole new board only to have iit fail due to adhesion issues.

heavy acetone wash would be my first step followed with heavy duty degreaser.
(Dawn dish soap and scrub brush).
let air dry for a week, then do the test strip to check for adhesion confirmation.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2873 posts in 2536 days


#8 posted 01-09-2018 09:57 PM

Very fine MDF is heavy also. Is there a definite grain on the end of the boards?
If so, then yes, you can cut it up.

I just kept wondering why that edge strip was there. Maybe decorative, maybe to hide MDF??

And as far as grease spatter, you can usually tell by putting your nose to the wood and taking in a deep breath – the old kitchen smell will tell the tale, grease lingers like old beer in a cheap bar.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

View Steve's profile

Steve

419 posts in 604 days


#9 posted 01-09-2018 10:03 PM

I think that piece of wood trim faced out toward the kitchen to tie the piece in with the rest of the cabinets and counter. I’m hoping to get some time this weekend to at least cut a piece off to see what it looks like.

I’ve gotten bit by the woodworking bug big time, so I’m just anxious to cut some wood and get some experience.

Thanks for all the ideas so far everyone.

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1735 posts in 2831 days


#10 posted 01-09-2018 10:34 PM

Do you cook outside…....?

Would make a nice chopping/slicing board by the smoker

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 185 days


#11 posted 01-09-2018 10:41 PM


I ve gotten bit by the woodworking bug big time, so I m just anxious to cut some wood and get some experience.

- bndawgs

Dawgs – if you are relativly new to woodworking – PLEASE – keep all your safety features in place
and understand and respect the equipment you use.

woodworking is fun as all get out and very rewarding – - – - but, people have been seriously hurt and killed
just by simple accidents and not knowing how certain machines work.
most importantly, understand how the riving knife (splitter) works on your table saw – and USE IT.

Tennessee: I think the wood piece beside my stove smells like fried bacon, sausage and eggs on one side
and fried fish on the other.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View Steve's profile

Steve

419 posts in 604 days


#12 posted 01-09-2018 10:45 PM

I ve gotten bit by the woodworking bug big time, so I m just anxious to cut some wood and get some experience.

- bndawgs

Dawgs – if you are relative new to woodworking – PLEASE – keep all your safety features in place
and understand and respect the equipment you use.

woodworking is fun as all get out and very rewarding – - – - but, people have been seriously hurt and killed
just by simple accidents and not knowing how certain machines work.
most importantly, understand how the riving knife (splitter) works on your table saw – and USE IT.

.

- John Smith

oh yeah, 100% agree. I’m very much aware of the dangers with the TS and other tools I own. I had quite a bit of experience back in HS woodworking, so I’m definitely not new to the arena.

View Steve's profile

Steve

419 posts in 604 days


#13 posted 01-15-2018 04:37 PM

Here’s a couple pics of the piece. Definitely solid wood strips. But end grains aren’t the fanciest looking. So not sure it’s worth slicing up for cutting boards. It’s about 2ft x 2ft

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1067 posts in 2872 days


#14 posted 01-15-2018 05:34 PM

Dawgs, I know that brand, have re-purposed many pieces, if you’re already seeing separations at the glue line you should cut the panel apart at the failing glue line, and re’glue it. Few people understand or respect wood counter-tops, (especially not the way a woodworking Chef does LOL), TOO often a lack of maintenance and care causes these to blow apart at the glue joints. Once you’ve glued it back into a strong panel you can cut your strips & flip them for an endgrain board which is the longest lasting & best type of board for your knives. Be careful though and oil it well, the maple is a light color and some items can stain it pretty deeply, beets, fine chopping of parsley etc.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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