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Forum topic by Wudnstuff posted 01-09-2018 01:08 PM 605 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Wudnstuff

8 posts in 633 days


01-09-2018 01:08 PM

Do you guys use a design program? and if so which programs?
Thank ahead of time

-- Kevin.... Prineville, Or


15 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1240 posts in 2193 days


#1 posted 01-09-2018 02:31 PM

For woodworking stuff I use the free version of Sketchup. It has a neat plugin called cut list which can lay your parts out on boards and sheet goods.

For 3d printing or creating layouts for a cnc machine, I like to use Cubify Design.

Both take some learning but once you get the hang of them they get faster and faster.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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lew

12425 posts in 3954 days


#2 posted 01-09-2018 03:42 PM

+1 Sketchup.

Sketchup Make 2017 is the last of the free downloadable Sketchup versions. There is also Sketchup Free which is a SAS version. Everything is done on line. “Free” doesn’t have as many “options” in the form of plugins and addons.

Sketchup Pro will continue to be updated and downloadable. Pro is the paid version.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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Wudnstuff

8 posts in 633 days


#3 posted 01-09-2018 04:16 PM

So Sketchup Make 2017 is what I was running…...now it crashes…....It starts up and loads and everything is good untill I draw one box or whatever then it crashes….....everytime….. I have uninstalled it and reinstalled it 10 times…........sso I went to the web version but it sucks because I cant figure out how to get all the tools…..

-- Kevin.... Prineville, Or

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

450 posts in 1930 days


#4 posted 01-09-2018 05:10 PM

+1 SketchUp.

I’m not very good with it yet, but I’m learning. I prefer the standalone version to the online (SAS) version, but I’ve used both. It’s really good for free. I like how you can get a 3D view of what you want to build and look at it from different angles. It helps me to visualize what the end result might look like.

There are online resources to help you learn. Here are a few links>

http://sketchupforwoodworkers.com/
http://www.finewoodworking.com/blog/design-click-build

Lumberjocks member jeffbranch posted a really nice review of a Sketchup guide for woodworkers.

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jmartel

8230 posts in 2348 days


#5 posted 01-09-2018 05:11 PM

Sketchup or AutoCAD. I’ve also used Rhino in the past, but I typically don’t use it for home projects much.

-- The quality of one's woodworking is directly related to the amount of flannel worn.

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LesB

1860 posts in 3641 days


#6 posted 01-09-2018 06:26 PM

I use the free Sketchup to get the 3D view of a project (my wife particularly likes that) but find it can be awkward to use and making dimensional changes can be time consuming. The learning curve is steep…...

After I do a Sketchup image I do my detail construction drawing with a 2D cad program specifically designed for Mac computers called MacDraft by Microspot. I get very precise fitting and dimensions with it. They have a basic Personal version for about $71 and other versions for a lot more. They offer a free trial also. It is rated as the best program for Macs.

-- Les B, Oregon

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bonesbr549

1576 posts in 3265 days


#7 posted 01-09-2018 08:22 PM

Lots of choices. First question is how do you want to use it? I would not call sketchup a 3d program. I do use it and have for years. If just wanting to do some drawings or scaled drawings or even a cutlist, then thats a good one.

If you want more of a cad/cam option then fusion 360 is a good one. Learning curve but much nicer if you want to integrate cam.

If you are looking to design reliefs and get real advanced then rhinocad but really $$$$$.

I got a years subscription to autodesk artcam as I’m wanting to develop my own 3d reliefs for cam. That cost not too bad.

Like I said really depends on what you want to do with it!

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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ScottM

691 posts in 2345 days


#8 posted 01-09-2018 08:37 PM

+1 Sketchup but I’m stuck now since, from what I read, they won’t be releasing any more 32 bit updates.

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MrRon

5190 posts in 3442 days


#9 posted 01-09-2018 10:05 PM

What design program? You are the designer. The software is just the drafting tool used to illustrate the design. I don’t know of any program that “designs”. I use Autocad© to draft my designs, but I am the designer, not the software. If I misunderstood you, I apoligize.

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Wudnstuff

8 posts in 633 days


#10 posted 01-10-2018 12:31 AM

All I need to be able to do is what I can do with Sketchup…......I dont know what you guys call Sketchup but I can draw say a pie cabinet and can rotate it, look inside, draw perfect joints, etc…........Thanks guys found out my graphics card is weak and outdated…....On to learning about those….....

-- Kevin.... Prineville, Or

View lew's profile

lew

12425 posts in 3954 days


#11 posted 01-12-2018 05:30 AM



So Sketchup Make 2017 is what I was running…...now it crashes…....It starts up and loads and everything is good untill I draw one box or whatever then it crashes….....everytime….. I have uninstalled it and reinstalled it 10 times…........sso I went to the web version but it sucks because I cant figure out how to get all the tools…..

- Wudnstuff

Usually when Sketchup works well and then starts to crash, it is due to a computer upgrade. Typically a change in video drivers or a different graphics card. Make certain when you install sketchup you run the .exe installation file as an administrator. Being logged in as the administrator is not sufficient.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View YesHaveSome's profile

YesHaveSome

128 posts in 457 days


#12 posted 01-12-2018 03:12 PM

I use Sketchup and I do not love it. It’s free so it’s hard to complain but the software just drives me crazy. There are so many inconsistencies in the way it functions. It can be quick for some things and take forever for other things. I’ve done Autocad for years both professionally and for my hobbies and I love it but screwing with the UCS in 3d can be cumbersome.

I messed around with Fusion360 and really liked it but there was a pretty steep learning curve. Autodesk knocked it out of the park in regards to their licensing. If you have less than $100K in revenue it’s free so you get the full featured soft and get to use it commercially for free till you get your feet under you.

The biggest downside to Fusion360 vs Sketchup or Autocad is the lack of tutorials and content for learning.

-- But where does the meat go?

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

2609 posts in 1586 days


#13 posted 01-12-2018 03:28 PM

I use Sketchup as well. I use it to work out details and prototype before a complex build or even just to work out geometry. I used to it to completely design and build a 6×48 belt sander for example and only had to tweak a couple of things during the build. I also use it to design and print full size templates for the bandsaw, jigsaw or scroll saw. Autocad Fusion360 is good too and probably has more capability but after using Sketchup first, it has been hard to get used to the differences. If you are interested in CNC, Fusion360 is probably the way to go. Both have learning curves so pick your poison and muscle through it.

BTW, After just doing the basic getting started tutorials on the Sketchup website and struggling a bit, I found Matthias Wandel's Sketchup tutorial to be a quick way to make sense of it. His pointers and examples got me productive very quickly. One pointer that will save you lots of grief and restarts is to make components early and often (that’ll make sense after you go through the tutorials).

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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ArtMann

1139 posts in 1015 days


#14 posted 01-12-2018 03:46 PM

Wow! I am so glad you pointed out that these programs don’t work without human input. I’ll bet nobody knew that.


What design program? You are the designer. The software is just the drafting tool used to illustrate the design. I don t know of any program that “designs”. I use Autocad© to draft my designs, but I am the designer, not the software. If I misunderstood you, I apoligize.

- MrRon


View YesHaveSome's profile

YesHaveSome

128 posts in 457 days


#15 posted 01-12-2018 07:19 PM

+1. You will ruin your model in a heartbeat if you forget the turn things into components.


I use Sketchup as well. I use it to work out details and prototype before a complex build or even just to work out geometry. I used to it to completely design and build a 6×48 belt sander for example and only had to tweak a couple of things during the build. I also use it to design and print full size templates for the bandsaw, jigsaw or scroll saw. Autocad Fusion360 is good too and probably has more capability but after using Sketchup first, it has been hard to get used to the differences. If you are interested in CNC, Fusion360 is probably the way to go. Both have learning curves so pick your poison and muscle through it.

BTW, After just doing the basic getting started tutorials on the Sketchup website and struggling a bit, I found Matthias Wandel s Sketchup tutorial to be a quick way to make sense of it. His pointers and examples got me productive very quickly. One pointer that will save you lots of grief and restarts is to make components early and often (that ll make sense after you go through the tutorials).

- Lazyman


-- But where does the meat go?

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