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Lubricant for sawstop

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Forum topic by RJweb posted 01-09-2018 12:44 AM 1564 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RJweb

119 posts in 2712 days


01-09-2018 12:44 AM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw

Good evening,

I was having trouble lowering my blade below the table, sawstop pcs, got it all cleaned out of sawdust in the gears, works fine now, but now i need to regrease these gears (elevation), contacted sawstop techs and they are telling me to use bearing grease, but my concearn was wouldn’t that attract the sawdust, i thought a dry lubricant. Any one else have this problem and what did you use, thx RJ

-- Life Begins @ 190 MPH


15 replies so far

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

305 posts in 1930 days


#1 posted 01-09-2018 01:00 AM

The issue you are having is something I dealt with almost daily in our school shop. One thing that helped us was by adding a section of flex tubing to the bottom of the lower blade guard to the dust outlet inside the cabinet. If you look at the owners manual, it shows this, yet it is not supplied with the purchase. Use a dry Teflon or graphite lube vs. any form of grease.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6845 posts in 2279 days


#2 posted 01-09-2018 01:06 AM

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View oldwood's profile

oldwood

151 posts in 1324 days


#3 posted 01-09-2018 04:33 AM

Have fought the same battle. Dry lube helped but is not the answer. May try the wax next.

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

541 posts in 1356 days


#4 posted 01-09-2018 05:10 AM

If Gulf Wax works what about bee’s wax? I’ve got about 4 lbs. Of it I need to use for something.
Gerald


- MrUnix


View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5032 posts in 2573 days


#5 posted 01-09-2018 11:42 AM

Bees wax should do just as well.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View RJweb's profile

RJweb

119 posts in 2712 days


#6 posted 01-09-2018 08:14 PM

Thx for your help, probably will try the dry lubricant and see if I can add that dust tube where needed, RJ

-- Life Begins @ 190 MPH

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2472 posts in 1925 days


#7 posted 01-09-2018 09:15 PM

I don’t know if this will help you, but anytime the insert comes off I blow off the dust inside.

-- I always suspected many gun nuts were afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View TrentDavis's profile

TrentDavis

41 posts in 2315 days


#8 posted 03-13-2018 05:27 PM

Stay away from dry lube unless you want to replace your gears. Wheel bearing grease is the best. In particular, check out this stuff: http://amzn.to/2hUH7Op

Dry lube works great for light machinery. As I’m sure you’ve noticed, your SawStop doesn’t really qualify as light machinery. Lithium grease is the next best choice but you’ll end up having to reapply it every week or two.

-- SawStop Users' Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/sawstopusersgroup/

View BoardButcherer's profile

BoardButcherer

144 posts in 174 days


#9 posted 03-13-2018 06:25 PM



Stay away from dry lube unless you want to replace your gears. Wheel bearing grease is the best. In particular, check out this stuff: http://amzn.to/2hUH7Op

Dry lube works great for light machinery. As I m sure you ve noticed, your SawStop doesn t really qualify as light machinery. Lithium grease is the next best choice but you ll end up having to reapply it every week or two.

- TrentDavis

Bearing grease is ideal, but christ does it collect dust like nothing else, and I’m in the same position and trying some alternate options.

Is the sawstop light? no, but the parts in question aren’t high friction, high heat or constant use either, so there is some leeway to get away from grease. I’ve done a lot of digging around and found out that the gulf wax mentioned in this thread is quite well liked by other people who need a dry lube for metal parts that work in dusty environments.

Seems that people use it quite a bit for motorcycle chains when it’s combined with Teflon and/or molybdenum disulfide.

Is it as good as Moly grease? No, but if it’s good enough for someone’s Harley for 5-600 miles it’s probably going to be good enough for the worm gear on my table saw for 5-600 yards before I re-apply. Even DuPont manufactures a chain wax, so there has to be something to it.

I understand you’ll still be recommending bearing grease because that’s what Sawstop recommends, but if you get the chance maybe you could ask someone if they’ve ever tested dry lubes and if so what they found out and why they don’t recommend them.

In the meantime I’ll be a community guinea pig. I’ve already got the parts waxed with a heavy dose of moly and a little Teflon in the mix. Now we wait for time to tell the truth.

View mramseyISU's profile

mramseyISU

535 posts in 1625 days


#10 posted 03-14-2018 05:36 PM

I’ve been using dry lube on my table saw for 6 or 7 years with no issues. I pull the back cover off about every 6 months and give it a good cleaning then I re-apply the graphite spray. I’ve found no reason to alter that but I’m just a weekend warrior so your mileage may vary.

-- Trust me I'm an engineer.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1361 posts in 1304 days


#11 posted 03-14-2018 05:42 PM

On many of my vintage tools that have dovetail ways or threaded parts that are used for adjustments, I use a spray on graphite.

It goes on wet but dries very fast and looks like a flat black paint. It leaves a very slick surface and does not attract dust.

View BoardButcherer's profile

BoardButcherer

144 posts in 174 days


#12 posted 03-14-2018 06:11 PM



On many of my vintage tools that have dovetail ways or threaded parts that are used for adjustments, I use a spray on graphite.

It goes on wet but dries very fast and looks like a flat black paint. It leaves a very slick surface and does not attract dust.

- AZWoody

Just my anecdotal observation after combining the powders with different batches of both jpw and Renaissance Wax, but if the spray-on Moly/graphite/Teflon is working great then Moly/Graphite/Teflon combined with wax is going to be exponentially better.

I’ll be using a 50/50 mix of Moly and Tungsten Disulfide on my next batch. Having the smaller particle to fill the smaller holes should be even more better and quite skookum.

View TrentDavis's profile

TrentDavis

41 posts in 2315 days


#13 posted 03-14-2018 11:49 PM


Stay away from dry lube unless you want to replace your gears. Wheel bearing grease is the best. In particular, check out this stuff: http://amzn.to/2hUH7Op

Dry lube works great for light machinery. As I m sure you ve noticed, your SawStop doesn t really qualify as light machinery. Lithium grease is the next best choice but you ll end up having to reapply it every week or two.

- TrentDavis

Bearing grease is ideal, but christ does it collect dust like nothing else, and I m in the same position and trying some alternate options.

Is the sawstop light? no, but the parts in question aren t high friction, high heat or constant use either, so there is some leeway to get away from grease. I ve done a lot of digging around and found out that the gulf wax mentioned in this thread is quite well liked by other people who need a dry lube for metal parts that work in dusty environments.

Seems that people use it quite a bit for motorcycle chains when it s combined with Teflon and/or molybdenum disulfide.

Is it as good as Moly grease? No, but if it s good enough for someone s Harley for 5-600 miles it s probably going to be good enough for the worm gear on my table saw for 5-600 yards before I re-apply. Even DuPont manufactures a chain wax, so there has to be something to it.

I understand you ll still be recommending bearing grease because that s what Sawstop recommends, but if you get the chance maybe you could ask someone if they ve ever tested dry lubes and if so what they found out and why they don t recommend them.

In the meantime I ll be a community guinea pig. I ve already got the parts waxed with a heavy dose of moly and a little Teflon in the mix. Now we wait for time to tell the truth.

- BoardButcherer

We’ve tested dry lubes. They just don’t hold up. Pretty soon it’s just metal on metal and that wears down the teeth on your gears. It’s pretty easy to replace the elevation gears on a SawStop. Even the worm gear on the tilt shaft is a walk in the park next to some of the other saws I’ve worked on. It’s the sector gear that the worm gear meshes with in order to tilt the blade that you need to worry about. If you screw that up then you need to replace the entire front trunnion.

-- SawStop Users' Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/sawstopusersgroup/

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9845 posts in 1566 days


#14 posted 03-15-2018 02:50 AM

Wax works like a champ.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View BoardButcherer's profile

BoardButcherer

144 posts in 174 days


#15 posted 03-15-2018 01:42 PM

We ve tested dry lubes. They just don t hold up. Pretty soon it s just metal on metal and that wears down the teeth on your gears. It s pretty easy to replace the elevation gears on a SawStop. Even the worm gear on the tilt shaft is a walk in the park next to some of the other saws I ve worked on. It s the sector gear that the worm gear meshes with in order to tilt the blade that you need to worry about. If you screw that up then you need to replace the entire front trunnion.

- TrentDavis

I know how easy it is, I just stripped down an ICS to the last nut and bolt. I also found every place that the sawdust clogs up the bearing grease that you can’t access without pulling the saw’s guts out.

It’s metal to metal after the sawdust soaks up the grease too, plus the sawdust jamming things up. That’s just a matter of maintenance, you clean up and re-apply no matter which one you use, and it’s a hell of a lot easier to clean up and re-apply using a dry lube. Metal to metal isn’t the end of the world when you’re using stuff like moly either. If you have a truck with a sectioned driveshaft the connections on the driveshaft are slimed up with 65% moly from the factory. That stuff dries out in the first year or so, and it’s just getting broken in. After all of the chewy bits of the joint wear off it’s no longer metal to metal, it’s moly to moly and good for another 150,000 miles or so.

Good enough for a commercial duty 1 ton pickup hauling heavy trailers? Good enough for my hand cranked table saw.

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