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Can my 110v Jobsite Table Saw be Rewired for 220v?

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Forum topic by GraceAndDrew posted 01-08-2018 10:15 PM 1411 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GraceAndDrew

34 posts in 332 days


01-08-2018 10:15 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tablesaw

I have a Delta jobsite table saw which I use in my garage shop only. I would like to change it to 220v if possible and I have 220 in my garage.

If it is possible, what is the wiring configuration?

Thanks!

-- Grace & Drew Woodworking, http://graceanddrew.com


16 replies so far

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6882 posts in 2313 days


#1 posted 01-08-2018 10:40 PM

Should indicate how to wire it on the motor data plate. Will be marked as “low voltage” (120v) and “high voltage” (240v). Switch the wires as indicated, and replace the plug on your supply wiring. If your data plate only indicates a single voltage, then it’s not possible.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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AlaskaGuy

4353 posts in 2423 days


#2 posted 01-08-2018 10:48 PM

Providing a model number would help.

Curiosity, If I’m right that a 15 AMP saw. What would the advantage be to switch to 240

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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crank49

4032 posts in 3085 days


#3 posted 01-08-2018 10:51 PM

Depends on what job site saw you have.
If you mean a portable job site saw, where the blade mounts directly on the motor shaft, the answer is “Probably Not”

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GraceAndDrew

34 posts in 332 days


#4 posted 01-08-2018 11:01 PM

The advantage would be lower amps, especially on start up. The amps spike at start up and trip the breaker. It’s not a big deal but I have a 220 outlet so I would like to use it if possible.

-- Grace & Drew Woodworking, http://graceanddrew.com

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MrUnix

6882 posts in 2313 days


#5 posted 01-08-2018 11:05 PM

Depending on what model you have – you may just have one of those magic Delta motors that are 1.5hp@120v, and 2hp@240v. Check the motor data plate – the dual hp motor looks like:

Notice two different horsepowers listed, and the FLA for 240v is more than half that for 120v. Dual voltage wiring diagram is on the bottom.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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WhyMe

1047 posts in 1675 days


#6 posted 01-08-2018 11:14 PM

In most cases it not worth changing a saw that is running on 120V over to run on 240V. What is your reason for wanting to do the change to 240V?

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knotscott

8120 posts in 3490 days


#7 posted 01-08-2018 11:37 PM

Most jobsite saws have a universal motor. If your Delta has a universal motor, won’t it spin at twice the RPM if you switch to 240v (aka 220v)?

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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jonah

1832 posts in 3413 days


#8 posted 01-09-2018 12:11 AM



Most jobsite saws have a universal motor. If your Delta has a universal motor, won t it spin at twice the RPM if you switch to 240v (aka 220v)?

- knotscott


No. Everything depends on the design of the motor. There are plenty of universal motor designs that operate in both the US (120V/60Hz) and Europe (mainly 220V/50Hz). I don’t know how common such things are in tools, but they’re all over the place.

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AlaskaGuy

4353 posts in 2423 days


#9 posted 01-09-2018 12:17 AM



In most cases it not worth changing a saw that is running on 120V over to run on 240V. What is your reason for wanting to do the change to 240V?

- WhyMe


He answered that above. I going to take another guess. His 120 outlet are 15 AMP circuits.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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WhyMe

1047 posts in 1675 days


#10 posted 01-09-2018 12:51 AM


In most cases it not worth changing a saw that is running on 120V over to run on 240V. What is your reason for wanting to do the change to 240V?

- WhyMe

He answered that above. I going to take another guess. His 120 outlet are 15 AMP circuits.

- AlaskaGuy

Somehow I overlooked his comment about the startup tripping the breaker.

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GraceAndDrew

34 posts in 332 days


#11 posted 01-09-2018 03:53 AM

Thanks everyone. I couldn’t check today but will tomorrow.

I have a 20 amp breaker but there is too much on it including a shop vac and more. The table saw trips it often. But, I have an empty 220 circuit…good problem to have I guess.

-- Grace & Drew Woodworking, http://graceanddrew.com

View Holt's profile

Holt

271 posts in 2743 days


#12 posted 01-09-2018 01:51 PM

If the 240 volt outlet has four connectors (and they are all wired) then you could break out a 120 volt circuit.


Thanks everyone. I couldn t check today but will tomorrow.

I have a 20 amp breaker but there is too much on it including a shop vac and more. The table saw trips it often. But, I have an empty 220 circuit…good problem to have I guess.

- GraceAndDrew


-- ...Specialization is for insects.

View Siv's profile

Siv

62 posts in 683 days


#13 posted 01-09-2018 03:22 PM

How about using a stepdown transformer? I see 2000W stepdown transformers for sale for around $70.

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jonah

1832 posts in 3413 days


#14 posted 01-09-2018 04:12 PM

You can always replace the 240V breaker and receptacle with a 120V one. If you’ve never replaced a breaker before, do it with the main power off (either by flipping the main breaker or by pulling the meter outside), but once you have experience with it, you can do it quite easily and safely with the main breaker on.

In fact, I would go that route before I messed around with the saw, since it’s likely not designed for use on 240V. None of my routers or circular saws are capable of operating on 240V.

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ArtMann

1038 posts in 930 days


#15 posted 01-09-2018 07:28 PM

A step down transformer will not supply the required neutral. It is extremely unsafe to run load current through a safety ground wire.


How about using a stepdown transformer? I see 2000W stepdown transformers for sale for around $70.

- Siv


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