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Forum topic by richgreer posted 03-20-2011 01:32 AM 1569 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


03-20-2011 01:32 AM

Today I was working on a communion rail (red oak) I have been building for our church. I was using my 5/8” round over bit in my Festool OF 1400 router when I took a brief break and lifted the router off the work and swung it by my side. The still running bit cut my power cord. Good grief!

I really had to get this job done today so I moved the bit to my old Makita RF1100 router to finish the job. WOW! What a difference. The Festool had moved along nicely with virtually no resistance. The Makita acted like it was being severely overloaded. I moved at a MUCH slower pace. It felt like my bit was dull when I knew that it wasn’t.

I had always thought that my trusty old Makita was a decent mid-level router. I also thought of the Festool as a mid-level router with respect to power. Festool makes a much more powerful OF 2200. Suddenly, I appreciate the value of power when routing.

FYI – A new power cord will cost $38 from Festool. I think I will patch up the old cord with some wire nuts and electrician’s tape.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.


19 replies so far

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3965 posts in 2632 days


#1 posted 03-20-2011 02:16 AM

No no….......get out your soldering iron and some electricians tape…......wire nuts in the middle of a cord…....heresy…..........(-:

Have a good one…........and thanks for the info re router power….........

If you don’t do soldering, learn it, simple cheap equipment (although I have expensive stuff since I was in ham radio…....etc). It will take you an hour to learn how to do it right, and it will open you up to a lot of possibilities over time.

Jim….....batching it…....Sherie is down in Seattle…......

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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Grandpa

3256 posts in 2143 days


#2 posted 03-20-2011 02:23 AM

Solder is the correct way to repair this cord. Shrink tubing can be used if everything is carefull thought out before starting the work. If black plastic electricians tape is used take some PVC cement and swab it over the tape on every layer. The tape will not come off if this is used.

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drewnahant

222 posts in 2557 days


#3 posted 03-20-2011 02:30 AM

I’m sure the festool router is better than the makita, but I would check your bit carefully, hitting the cord could have dulled it instantly. I’ve hit a few power lines with drill bits, and the electrical arc will melt the tip right off of them. Maybe it is just the router, but if it is that much of a difference, check that bit before you use it on another project.
also, SOLDER THAT CORD, wire nuts should never be used on stranded wire.

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3144 days


#4 posted 03-20-2011 03:37 AM

Where’s Charlie and the popcorn? ;-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Jim Bertelson

3965 posts in 2632 days


#5 posted 03-20-2011 04:22 AM

Well…......................................for what it is worth, I always use shrink tubing…............didn’t want to overwhelm poor old Rich…........(-: (-: (-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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Bernie

416 posts in 2305 days


#6 posted 03-20-2011 04:27 AM

Rich… I don’t give this advise to anybody, but since I like you… DUCT TAPE

As I was reading your post, I thought the worst, an injury. I once had the bit fly out of the chuck and got lucky nothing came of it. Interesting to read the solder posts. Sounds like I have to learn a new skill. Thanks guys, that’s why I love this LJ site.

As for the tool comparison, maybe drewnehant is right, but there is truth in what you say. When it comes to tools, you get what you pay for. A few years ago, I had a Craftsman saber saw that couldn’t get me through a project. A friend loaned me his Dewalt and the difference was substantial. I did my homework and bought a Bosch. When my friend came to visit, I loaned him my Bosch to take a test run. He said that his Dewalt was like cutting hardwood and my Bosch was like cutting butter.

-- Bernie: It never gets hot or cold in New Hampshire, just seasonal!

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William

9906 posts in 2310 days


#7 posted 03-20-2011 04:49 AM

I second checking the bit carefully. I have done this once, and destroyed a router bit from the electric arc it created.
Also, on power tools, I suggest never splicing a cord at all. The only way I’d reuse that cord is if it’s close enough to the router that you could shorten it but still keep the external part of the cord without splices. My brother does construction work. If they nick a cord or hose, they have to get rid of it. The company they work for doesn’t allow any type of spliced cords. So anytime they mess up a cord, he brings it to me. I’ve got plenty of cords now so I keep them so I can use them on power tools.
For example, I cut my circular saw cord about a year ago. Not only was I able to replace the cord with one without a splice, but I now have a longer cord on it too. It’s not hard at all once you have the handle of most tools disassembled to figure out how to use the male end of an extension cord for replacement and a lot of tools benefit from a longer cord.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


#8 posted 03-20-2011 04:16 PM

Thanks for all the good advice – and topamax’s comment as well.

I can see no damage to my bit which is very fortunate because that is a relatively expensive (Freud) bit.

By pure coincidence, someone has listed new power cords for Festool on e-bay. Despite the cost ($35 – free shipping), I have already ordered one. I really don’t want to have a patched up cord on my nice tool.

I guess I learned a lesson – don’t mess around with your router until the bit has completely stopped.

In retrospect, I think I was a little harsh in my comparison of the Makita to the Festool. The Makita has a maximum amp draw of 11 and the Festool has a maximum amp draw of 14. Hence, the Festool is intended to be a more powerful machine. Still – the difference was quite substantial.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 2152 days


#9 posted 03-20-2011 06:01 PM

rich

a carpenter I knew told me if he was ever on an airplane where the door opened up and he was being sucked out, he’d grab the nearest extension cord…they manage to hook onto anything.

I think a cord is a cord! go to HD or Lowes (we prefer Menards but they are regional to us) and get a 3 wire pig-tailed cord (guessing 14ga) for about $10 or less. Get a few of the crimp connectors while you’re there. Goes without saying that you’ll want to get all the wires fed to final destination before you put the connectors on but thought I’d mention it because that idiot in the mirror might have forgot that once.

as long as we’re on the subject, I needed a new circ saw a few years ago after winning the tool toss contest with yet another Craftsman Christmas present (my in-laws mean well). I bought the Bosch model that uses any standard 3 prong extension cord (in any length I want). Besides being the best circ saw I have ever used, that cord thing is a great idea, especially if I were to ever nick it.

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


#10 posted 03-20-2011 08:14 PM

I need to point out that Festool tools have a detachable cord. There is a special connector where the cord connects to the tool (router in my case). In theory, I could attach that special connector to the shortened cord, but it is essentially a sealed unit and I think it would be very difficult (perhaps impossible) to connect it to a slightly shorter cord.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Mary Anne's profile

Mary Anne

1058 posts in 2676 days


#11 posted 03-20-2011 08:55 PM

Rich,
Glad YOU got out of it unscathed! Isn’t being able to switch tools using a single cord was one of cool things about Festool products? I was thinking you could choose to use the cord from one of your other Festools rather than switch to the Makita. Or is the Festool router cord different in some way from your others?

View teejk's profile

teejk

1215 posts in 2152 days


#12 posted 03-20-2011 09:10 PM

good to know about the Festool cord system Rich…I salivate at some of their products but PC/Dewalt/Bosch have served me well and while not cheap compared to HF/skil/B&D etc. they are more within my budget.

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3965 posts in 2632 days


#13 posted 03-20-2011 09:21 PM

There are cords, and there are cords. Some are stiff, some are flexible, some are thick, some are narrow, some crack in cold weather, and the plugs vary greatly as well. If it comes from China, it may not even meet the wire gauge spec, or the copper may be adulterated. Given my choice, I replace a cord with components of my selection, so that it wears well.

If Rich were to hire me to do this, knowing Rich, I would replace the cord with a Festool original. He would gladly pay the price to get the quality.

.....and now hearing that the cord is detachable, no contest.

Betcha Rich buys the Festool cord…...........(-:

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3144 days


#14 posted 03-21-2011 05:46 AM

Interesting there would be that much difference; 3 amps would only amount to about 1/8 hp in real world hp on small AC motors. Is the RPM about the same?

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2542 days


#15 posted 03-21-2011 10:09 PM

I assume the rpm’s are about the same. Both are variable speed and I run both close to the maximum (about 20,000 rpm) with this size of bit.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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