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Forum topic by doubleG469 posted 01-08-2018 09:45 PM 719 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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doubleG469

657 posts in 648 days


01-08-2018 09:45 PM

Working on a fairly green oak bowl and have been chasing these cracks down but can’t find an end. Any pointers on how to save this? CA glue isn’t working and I’d prefer not to epoxy it.

Thanks

-- Gary, Texas


19 replies so far

View HokieKen's profile (online now)

HokieKen

7142 posts in 1342 days


#1 posted 01-08-2018 09:50 PM

Looks to me like the cracks are substantial enough that epoxy may be your best option. If it’s still green, the checking is gonna get worse…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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John Smith

1488 posts in 366 days


#2 posted 01-08-2018 10:07 PM

Note to Self: never turn fairly green oak (or any green wood, for that matter).

back in the ‘80s, I used PEG to help stabilize green wood for turning.
the object is to turn your project down to within 1/4 – 1/2” of completed size
then soak it in the PEG for the required amount of time, then finish turning to specs.
Note: PEG will discolor some woods – experimentation and testing is highly recommended.
final results will vary with species of wood, length of soak and climatic conditions.

Polyethylene Glycol (PEG) Green Wood Stabilizer

”Wood Juice” is another green wood stabilizer.
Read – Understand – and Follow all instructions and safety precautions for these products.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

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LesB

1866 posts in 3646 days


#3 posted 01-09-2018 01:06 AM

Use a medium or thick CA glue (super glue) to fill the cracks as soon as they appear. Keep adding more until it stops sinking into the crack. That not only fills them it can usually stop them; at least temporarily. It has worked for me.
When the cracks are big enough I pack fine sawdust into the cracks then moving quickly, apply the thin super glue to soak the sawdust and immediately add the thicker glue. The thin stuff draws the thicker glue in. Let set until hard or treat with an accelerator.

To speed up drying of wet wood I usually rough turn the blank then dry it in the microwave oven. I use a brown paper bag to hold the partially turned blank, then nuke it until the wood is almost too hot to hold. Leave it in the bag so the “steam” keeps the outside damp and let it cool then open the bag for a few minutes.This works like a commercial steam kiln and brings the inside moisture to the surface. Repeat this process until the blank is dry. In between heating I check for cracks and treat them with medium super glue which “usually” stops them from cracking further…..be careful of any fumes from the glue it can damage your nose and possibly your lungs, you will spell it.
The blank will warp some and need to be trued up and then finish the turning. Expect some failures….....

-- Les B, Oregon

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OSU55

1975 posts in 2193 days


#4 posted 01-09-2018 01:35 AM

Turned a lot of green oak. Looks like you have some branch wood will crack more. CA glue works for me, many times thin, medium and thick, on the wet bowl. You can nuke in a bag as suggested if you are in a hurry, or let it sit around in the house for 2-3 months (what I do). Then be prepared for it to possibly be unusable, or have some good cracks to fill, which I consider character in the piece. Leave 10% and probably a little more of the dia as min wall thickness, and dont put in details like you did at the rim. Leave enough to do the detail after it dries.

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Wildwood

2481 posts in 2338 days


#5 posted 01-09-2018 11:42 AM

I have use a coffee grinder to grind saw dust to realy find powder for filling cracks with medium CA. Also use use old coffer grounds or herbal tea to fill cracks with CA may or may not use the grinder.

JMHO, looking at your pictures would either leave it as is or toss that bowl in the firewood pile. Those cracks will stand out regardless of time & effort you expend on them.

Probably not what you want to hear, so go for it! Hope it works out for you.

Not a big fan of PEG and Petacryl green wood stablizers out there due to cost of them and equipment needed and learning curve. To get best results need to soak green wood for a period of time. They also limit finishing materials you can use.

-- Bill

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jeffswildwood

3607 posts in 2181 days


#6 posted 01-09-2018 01:13 PM

Gary, you know I’m no expert but I would do all I can to keep the bowl. The cracks do give it a “character”. I would stop now, let it dry for future tuning and fill the cracks as posted above. Start a new one and keep having fun turning. I’m finding out that I don’t have to finish each thing I start. I can put it aside and come back to it later when it drys. A part of turning I didn’t consider before.

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View doubleG469's profile

doubleG469

657 posts in 648 days


#7 posted 01-09-2018 01:25 PM

Thanks for all the info, most I have considered except the PEG chemicals. I’d prefer to not use stuff like that. This is one I started month and half ago and when the cracks were small i filled them with CA. Came back to it yesterday and they were expanding. Tried to chase them down and see if I could turn past them but doesn’t look so. I’ll throw it to the side and let it sit up a bit more and see in a few months.

thanks again for the info

-- Gary, Texas

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Nubsnstubs

1422 posts in 1933 days


#8 posted 01-09-2018 03:23 PM

Gary, have you started hogging out the inside yet? If so, how thick are the sides?? I might have a solution for saving the bowl and giving those cracks character if your sides are thick enough. ........ Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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lew

12437 posts in 3959 days


#9 posted 01-09-2018 03:33 PM



Note to Self: never turn fairly green oak (or any green wood, for that matter).

- John Smith

You are missing a lot of enjoyment by eliminating green wood from your turning experiences. Turning green wood to a thin finished thickness will eliminate a lot (if not all) cracking. Wall thicknesses of 3/16 to 1/8 inch are best. Of course some of this depends on the species.

Folks who are new here have probably not seen some of the work by a long time member “Trifern”- http://lumberjocks.com/trifern. Check out his posts and his recommendations.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

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doubleG469

657 posts in 648 days


#10 posted 01-09-2018 05:08 PM

Nubsnstubs, I have not, I didn’t want the cracks to make it all the way through.

Lew I agree the green wood turns like butta but this is what you have to deal with if you do.

-- Gary, Texas

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

3607 posts in 2181 days


#11 posted 01-09-2018 06:59 PM


Note to Self: never turn fairly green oak (or any green wood, for that matter).

- John Smith

You are missing a lot of enjoyment by eliminating green wood from your turning experiences. Turning green wood to a thin finished thickness will eliminate a lot (if not all) cracking. Wall thicknesses of 3/16 to 1/8 inch are best. Of course some of this depends on the species.

Folks who are new here have probably not seen some of the work by a long time member “Trifern”- http://lumberjocks.com/trifern. Check out his posts and his recommendations.

- lew


I just checked Trifern’s projects. He is the master!

-- We all make mistakes, the trick is to fix it in a way that says "I meant to do that".

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1156 posts in 1019 days


#12 posted 01-09-2018 07:14 PM

The cracks in that second picture don’t look like normal oak splits. I have seen that sort of cracking in salvaged lumber cut from tornado downed trees. It is common around here due to the number of tornados that have gone through the area in the last several years and leveled hundreds of acres of forest. You have to be really careful about buying tornado wood because often the internal damage doesn’t show up until it is too late. I hope that isn’t your situation.

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doubleG469

657 posts in 648 days


#13 posted 01-09-2018 07:56 PM

artmann it may be the case, these were from salvaged oaks I hand split them into blanks then cleaned them up on my bandsaw.

-- Gary, Texas

View DMiller's profile

DMiller

434 posts in 676 days


#14 posted 01-09-2018 09:15 PM

One option, instead of trying to remove the cracks, try to spice them up. In this I mean inserting a bowtie or something of the sort, if you like bowties. Also depends on what the purpose of the bowl will be.

Hope this helps…Dale

-- Dale Miller Modesto, CA "I can do all things through Christ, which strengtheneth me." Philippians 4:13. "Woodworking minus patience equals firewood."

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poospleasures

776 posts in 2687 days


#15 posted 01-10-2018 01:01 AM

According to what you want with this bowl you could put it aside for a while and let it crack some more then accent the cracks with some shinny stuff mixed with epoxy. I do stuff like that a lot and most of the people who see them call it character. Have sold a bunch of them.

-- I,ve had amnesia for as long as I can remember. Vernon

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