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Forum topic by SonOfMI posted 01-07-2018 07:39 PM 905 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SonOfMI

15 posts in 1156 days


01-07-2018 07:39 PM

I have a Grizzly G0690 table saw I bought new about 3 years ago. I had been cutting dados with a router for awhile but built a large number of trays that needed grooves. It thought it’d be easier to cut the grooves on my saw. I noticed the bottoms were not flat on the test cuts. The blade on the inside of the cut was shorter than the rest of the stack. I switched back to using a router and came back to checking the saw problem this week. I tried a Freud box joint set and a couple different dado sets, all with the same issue. The inside blade (closest to the fixed flange) was short. After looking at several things, checking the trunnion, making sure Arbor was parallel with table, and Arbor was seated properly, I measured the Arbor. The inside spot, where a single blade sits, is smaller than the rest of the Arbor.

I didn’t notice this until lately, but then I’d been using different tool for cutting dados. I cut some dados with it when I first got it, but I don’t remember what the results were. I had gotten used to cutting them with a router and it’s just faster for me to setup. But this Arbor thing concerns me. I stacked shims against the fixed flange and made test cuts with the different sets. I got flat bottoms. The shims push the first blade in the stack over further onto the Arbor, where the Arbor is the same size.

Is this a common issue with table saws or is it a Grizzly thing? This thing is a 3HP cabinet saw. I didn’t expect anything like this.


19 replies so far

View unbob's profile

unbob

810 posts in 2019 days


#1 posted 01-08-2018 03:57 AM

Simply install a shim against the arbors flange to move the blade over slightly so it does not fall into the groove.
Most saw arbors are threaded without a relief groove, if that’s what it is, moving the blade over slightly will solve it.

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SonOfMI

15 posts in 1156 days


#2 posted 01-08-2018 09:37 PM

Yeah, I did the shim thing already and even talked about it in my original post. I’ve talked with my Uncle who has a unisaw and two friends with sawstops, all of these saws are older than mine. None of them have had issues with the arbors on their saws. My question, which was also in the original post, is how common of an issue is this?

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jerryminer

939 posts in 1557 days


#3 posted 01-08-2018 09:46 PM

My question, which was also in the original post, is how common of an issue is this?

- SonOfMI

I don’t think it’s very common. I’ve used a lot of table saws—but none from Grizzly—over the years and I’ve never seen this issue.

Was the arbor machined this way, or did it wear somehow? You shouldn’t have to shim out away from the flange, but in your case that sounds like the easy way out.

-- Jerry, making sawdust professionally since 1976

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1115 posts in 2068 days


#4 posted 01-08-2018 09:53 PM

I am having a hard time understanding what you are describing. If I have it correctly you said that the diameter of the arbor shaft is not uniform and is smaller up close to the flange. I don’t see how this would result in the cut you described. If the top of the inner blade was lower when you set up the stack then the teeth 180 degrees around the blade would be correspondingly higher as compared to the rest of the stack. I think that this would result in that blade cutting deeper into the dado than the rest. Is that what you are seeing? Your description of “the blade on the inside of the cut was shorter” makes it sound like that blade was leaving a high spot in the finished dado. I cannot see how that could happen.

Can you post a picture of the dado and one of the arbor itself?

View Steve's profile

Steve

69 posts in 1126 days


#5 posted 01-08-2018 11:27 PM


My question, which was also in the original post, is how common of an issue is this?

- SonOfMI

I’ve had two Grizzly saws, one a lower end contractor saw I bought in the early 90’s (G1022) and a newer cabinet saw (G1023RL) I replaced it with about a year ago. (The trunnion on the old saw wore out.) I can’t speak for everyone, of course, but I’ve never experienced (or heard of) the problem you described. I suspect there’s a defect in your arbor. Have you contacted Grizzly about the issue? Normally, their customer service in matters like this is pretty good.

-- ~Steve

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8120 posts in 3492 days


#6 posted 01-08-2018 11:33 PM

It’s not a common problem, but the Ridgid 3650 and Craftsman 315 had some contractor saws with that issue at one time. IIRC, the problem was actually with TTI/Ryobi, who made both of those saws. This is the first I’ve heard about it on a G0690.

This pic shows the issue on the Ridgid:

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View rbrjr1's profile

rbrjr1

170 posts in 322 days


#7 posted 01-09-2018 01:50 PM

interesting..

shimming it will take care of the problem.

why wouldn’t they have just copied the same thread layout seen on 99% of the other saws on the market, instead of “engineering” a problem into their arbor..

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

View SonOfMI's profile

SonOfMI

15 posts in 1156 days


#8 posted 01-09-2018 07:10 PM

Thanks for the replies. I’m out doing quotes today and the measurements I took with the calipers are in my shop, but here is a picture of the dados cut without a shim going on first. The inside blade, the one closest to the fixed flange, cuts short, not as deep as the other blades.

I talked with Grizzly tech support yesterday and they believe it’s a problem with the Arbor. They think a blade was spinning on the Arbor, causing the Arbor to wear. I don’t remember this happening, but I’m not the only person who uses this saw. They said I probably wouldn’t notice a blade spinning like that anyway.

The Arbor is $50 to buy since it’s out of warranty at this point. I’m going to do some more test cuts tonight when I get home putting a shim on first to see how thick of a dado I can cut before deciding what to do. Replacing the Arbor looks to be quite a bit of work and time. I’ll have to rig up some stuff since I don’t have all the proper tools to do it. With my router and jigs I can get great dados but there’s times cutting them on a table saw is just easier due to the setup involved. If I can’t get a 3/4” dado cut from the saw anymore I’m undecided on replacing the Arbor or selling it and getting something else. Having to replace a critical part already doesn’t sit easy with me.

View Boberto's profile

Boberto

20 posts in 1084 days


#9 posted 01-10-2018 04:46 AM

I have a 3yr old go690 and changed the blade on it this evening and both blades fit tight all the way to the flange. There is a short place right where the blade sits against the flange without threads but that is the same diameter as the threads and the blade sits just as tight there as the threads are.

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 708 days


#10 posted 01-10-2018 12:34 PM



.....
I m undecided on replacing the Arbor or selling it and getting something else.

- SonOfMI


Craiglist deal hunters, be aware of a problematic saw popping up in town!

View AAL's profile

AAL

75 posts in 1542 days


#11 posted 01-10-2018 03:11 PM

1.) The image shown above by knotscott that shows the “missing thread”, if the same diameter as the threads, should pose no problem with seating the blade. Actually, it provides more bearing surface in contact with the hole in the blade. I don’t see how that could contribute to the stated problem.
2.) I agree with Kazooman’s assessment.
3.) If the finished surface of the dado is tapered across the entire width; if each of the blades are of the same diameter; if the arbor is parallel to the table across its entire length; then I can only conclude that the arbor or trunnion is deflecting under the cutting pressure. Have you placed an indicator on the arbor & applied some force to check for deflection?
4.) Did you confirm that the arbor was exactly at 90° before making the dado cut?
5.) Do you lock/clamp the tilt adjustment when cutting?

-- "Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10091 posts in 1602 days


#12 posted 01-10-2018 03:29 PM


.....
I m undecided on replacing the Arbor or selling it and getting something else.

- SonOfMI

Craiglist deal hunters, be aware of a problematic saw popping up in town!

- Carloz

Go away.

I’m in agreement with kazooman. The inside should be cutting higher than the rest of the stack. Is this the case?

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View SonOfMI's profile

SonOfMI

15 posts in 1156 days


#13 posted 01-10-2018 03:41 PM

The inside is cutting short, not as deep as the outer blades. I tried posting a picture of the results yesterday from my phone, but it looks like it didn’t work. I have my laptop with me today. Looking at the pic, the inside blade made the cut that isn’t as deep as the other part.

View AAL's profile

AAL

75 posts in 1542 days


#14 posted 01-10-2018 03:53 PM

Rotate the teeth of the inner blade under a dial indicator to establish its OD. Then slide the indicator over to the outer blade & check how the teeth compare. From the image you just posted it appears you have blades of different diameters, with the inner blade perhaps smaller in diameter.

-- "Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy, its inherent virtue is the equal sharing of misery." Winston Churchill

View SonOfMI's profile

SonOfMI

15 posts in 1156 days


#15 posted 01-10-2018 04:06 PM

I can do this, but think it is unlikely that all the inner blades on the three sets I have are smaller in diameter than the other blades in the sets. I tried different stacks and got the same results with each. Because the results were the same, I didn’t take pictures of each. I have an 8” Freud box joint set, 6” Freud dado stack, and 8” Ridge Carbide dado stack. The 8” sets I bought after I got this saw, so it’s possible the inner blade is short. I used the 6” Freud dado stack on my previous saw and got flat bottoms with it.


Rotate the teeth of the inner blade under a dial indicator to establish its OD. Then slide the indicator over to the outer blade & check how the teeth compare. From the image you just posted it appears you have blades of different diameters, with the inner blade perhaps smaller in diameter.

- AAL


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