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Forum topic by Chucknbob posted 01-07-2018 02:46 AM 820 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Chucknbob

3 posts in 321 days


01-07-2018 02:46 AM

So I need to upgrade my sharpening system for my chisels and plane, but I’m at a loss as to what to get. I know I want a stone, constantly buying sandpaper doesn’t sound good to me. Also, I’m looking for something simple, hopefully hit 2-3 stones and be back to cutting wood within 5-10 minutes.

There’s just so much out where, water stones, oil stones, and new diamond stuff. Plus there’s 50 different grit options for each.

Can someone please point me towards a type of stone and what grits I should look for? Many thanks.


18 replies so far

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

2774 posts in 1885 days


#1 posted 01-07-2018 03:26 AM

Depends on what you want to spend. I use diamond plates and then finish sharpening with a black hard Arkansas stone. Paul Sellers has a good set up if you watch his videos. This is if you want to do it by hand if you wanted to go the machine route then I’m not of much help but I’m sure someone will chime in on a good machine.

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Aj2

1441 posts in 1825 days


#2 posted 01-07-2018 03:30 AM

Chuck if you can put together a grinder with a proper wheel that doesn’t over heat your steel you can limit your stones to a finer grit. I hollow grind my plane blades and so straight to my Shapton finishing stone.
I have good variety of sharpening mediums I think my shapton stone are the best.
This road can get expensive so go slow you don’t want to spend money on stuff not needed.

-- Aj

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Chucknbob

3 posts in 321 days


#3 posted 01-07-2018 03:37 AM



Depends on what you want to spend. I use diamond plates and then finish sharpening with a black hard Arkansas stone. Paul Sellers has a good set up if you watch his videos. This is if you want to do it by hand if you wanted to go the machine route then I m not of much help but I m sure someone will chime in on a good machine.

- diverlloyd

I’ve watched Paul’s videos, but other than saying he sprays windex on the stones (which I assume means water stone) he says nothing else about grits, types, etc.

I would like to keep it under $50, but if it takes more to get a system that will last the next 10 years than so be it.

View Smirak's profile

Smirak

71 posts in 546 days


#4 posted 01-07-2018 05:15 AM

Trend diamond plate in 300/1000, shaptons from there…I have a 6000 and a 16000…I free hand and can be back to the bench in less than a minute unless the edge is beat up…

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Ripper70

1025 posts in 936 days


#5 posted 01-07-2018 07:04 AM



I ve watched Paul’s videos, but other than saying he sprays windex on the stones (which I assume means water stone) he says nothing else about grits, types, etc.

I would like to keep it under $50, but if it takes more to get a system that will last the next 10 years than so be it.

- Chucknbob


Watch this Sellers video to get the specifics on the stones he uses. I think, using a setup like this, you’d be hard pressed to keep the costs below $250 dollars, let alone $50.

You could consider the “Scary Sharp” method which uses plate glass and wet sandpaper. It has low start up costs but will be a more expensive approach to sharpening over the long haul. Plenty of YouTube videos and online information is available detailing the Scary Sharp method.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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HorizontalMike

7758 posts in 2941 days


#6 posted 01-07-2018 01:09 PM

I pretty much gave up on stones after going with a cheap belt sharpener. After +4yr, I am on my 2nd or 3rd 180-grit belt. And I can sharpen any tool being used, in less than a minute.

http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/3179

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

2873 posts in 2542 days


#7 posted 01-07-2018 01:25 PM

I finally got tired of dull chisels and bought the Grizz machine that is a Tormek knock-off. To be honest, it does a really nice job on flat blades of all types. The leather hone, turns out that the substance they have you put on it is the same as TurtleWax white rubbing compound, so after sharpening, I hone on the leather with that compound, and it will definitely give me a shave, if I want. Takes about two minutes to resharpen, once I hit the switch. I don’t do any lathe tools on it, use a Wolverine set on a slow speed grinder with CBN wheels for that.

-- Tsunami Guitars and Custom Woodworking, Cleveland, TN

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Knockonit

376 posts in 230 days


#8 posted 01-07-2018 02:15 PM

I did the griz unit, still trying to master it, had a couple jigs come with it, then stumbled onto a work sharp at a garage/estate sale, missing paper, ect. but for 10 bucks wth, anyway, boy howdy, what an easy way to sharpen chisels, so i have a nice little sharpening station on a counter at back of shop.
I’m still struggling with the grizz and planer blades, but eventually i’ll finger it out, just need to take the time

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

2942 posts in 2200 days


#9 posted 01-07-2018 02:35 PM

Worksharp

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

392 posts in 1204 days


#10 posted 01-07-2018 04:45 PM

Chris schwarz has a good blog series on sharpening. One of the posts is specifically about grits. It’s a good read:

blog.lostartpress.com/2017/07/10/sharpen-this-part-1/

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5000 posts in 2521 days


#11 posted 01-08-2018 12:42 PM

I think $50 pretty much limits you to the sandpaper/glass (Scary Sharp) system, and even then you would need shop built fixtures to hold the blades. But you might be surprised at how effective that system is.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2636 posts in 675 days


#12 posted 01-08-2018 12:57 PM

My sharpening system cost me just about $20. I use this system for chisels and plane irons … both get a lot of use as I’m unplugged hand tools only. This system hasn’t failed me yet.
 

 
... consists of Harbor Freight diamond impregnated plates (course, medium, and fine), 1000 grit wet/dry sandpaper on glass, and a leather strop charged with chromium oxide. I use a honing guide to insure a constant angle while I work my way from left to right across the station, starting with the course diamond plate and ending up with the leather strop.
 

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  https://ronaylor.wordpress.com

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1234 posts in 2023 days


#13 posted 01-08-2018 01:21 PM

If we’re starting today, is get a LN Ohishi 1k/8k combo stone and a coarse diamond plate. The coarse diamond plage could be jsed to flatten the stone when needed and for heavy regrindimg if needed. It could be replaced with sandpaper on glass.

The Above would require no soaking, just a water bottle. More than $50 though.

Sandpaper gets expensive over time, so you’ll need to figure out how you want to spend…up front or over time.

I also recall a video on the YouTube channel ‘burrfection’ about a $40 400/1k stone that did a fair job. He was comparing them to the 320 and 1k s haptons. It was a soaking water stone, but combined with a cheap strop should do it for you.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

1702 posts in 2017 days


#14 posted 01-08-2018 01:33 PM

A simple switch to a more durable abrasive will take care of it. For primary bevel creation, a machine is really needed whether a bench grinder, belt sander, worksharp. Takes a LOT of sandpaper and time to create a new bevel.

However, for honing, get some polishing film. Its the scary sharp system with abrasive that lasts a long time.
Here is my method.

View gtrgeo's profile

gtrgeo

9 posts in 458 days


#15 posted 01-10-2018 10:47 PM

When I started years ago, water stones were the way to go. Went down to my local Woodcraft and had them set me up with the necessary supplies to get going. I got sharp tools but the work involved was more than I cared for and very messy. For years I struggled because quite frankly the thought of breaking out the wet stones and the amount of work necessary, the flattening of stones, the mess involved, and the varying results kept all of the sharpening equipment in a drawer.

I contemplated the sandpaper route for a while but didn’t want to deal with the paper.

About a year ago I picked up the Worksharp and have been pleased. There is still some mess involved but I can quickly clean up with the shop vac. There is a little learning curve and the system does have its limitations but I tend to keep my tools sharp now as it is quick to touch them up during a project.

The one tool I am still struggling with is the cabinet scraper. Any help would be appreciated.

George

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