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Is it antique heart pine?

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Forum topic by Gabebell posted 01-05-2018 01:55 PM 478 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Gabebell

6 posts in 222 days


01-05-2018 01:55 PM

Topic tags/keywords: pine

Found the original wide plank wood floor in our 1880 colonial home underneath the carpet, asbestos tile and subfloor. As we began to sand, I noticed the smell of Christmas tree and knew it was pine… the question is, is it heart wood? Also there are little 1”x 2” pieces cut out and then nailed back in. What would be the purpose for this?!https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/p22d7mi.jpg!


11 replies so far

View firefighterontheside's profile

firefighterontheside

18656 posts in 1936 days


#1 posted 01-05-2018 02:05 PM

Where are you located? Heart pine is predominantly from long leaf pine and some loblolly?

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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dhazelton

2786 posts in 2376 days


#2 posted 01-05-2018 02:08 PM

I’m thinking that’s plain old white pine which is still very lovely.

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Gabebell

6 posts in 222 days


#3 posted 01-05-2018 02:24 PM

We are in Cincinnati Ohio. Also, here is a picture of the small pieces cut out and nailed back in that I was referring to…


Found the original wide plank wood floor in our 1880 colonial home underneath the carpet, asbestos tile and subfloor. As we began to sand, I noticed the smell of Christmas tree and knew it was pine… the question is, is it heart wood? Also there are little 1”x 2” pieces cut out and then nailed back in. What would be the purpose for this?!https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/p22d7mi.jpg!

- Gabebell


Where are you located? Heart pine is predominantly from long leaf pine and some loblolly?

- firefighterontheside


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Gabebell

6 posts in 222 days


#4 posted 01-05-2018 02:28 PM

Oh OK! I am not very knowledgeable on wood species, you are probably right. Whatever it is, we are restoring it!


I m thinking that s plain old white pine which is still very lovely.

- dhazelton


I m thinking that s plain old white pine which is still very lovely.

- dhazelton


I m thinking that s plain old white pine which is still very lovely.

- dhazelton


I m thinking that s plain old white pine which is still very lovely.

- dhazelton


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firefighterontheside

18656 posts in 1936 days


#5 posted 01-05-2018 02:29 PM

Yeah, I’m thinking white pine too.

-- Bill M. "People change, walnut doesn't" by Gene.

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Gabebell

6 posts in 222 days


#6 posted 01-05-2018 02:33 PM

Ok thanks!


Yeah, I’m thinking white pine too.

- firefighterontheside


View jonah's profile

jonah

1820 posts in 3378 days


#7 posted 01-05-2018 03:58 PM

I agree with the group. Eastern white pine. Definitely worth getting sanded and refinished. For the love of god do not add any stain – they’re going to have plenty of color.

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

15436 posts in 2698 days


#8 posted 01-05-2018 04:02 PM

I’m going to suggest the small patches are exactly that: patches. I’ve worked over / refurbed / removed pine floors and subfloors quite a bit. Those kinds of fixes are not necessarily common, but I’ve seen them. More often, when those floors are covered up by later renovations, holes are filled with wood bits or even covered with pieces of tin or lids of coffee cans, nailed to the floor.

It should refinish beautifully. Here are a few pictures of my pine shop floor.

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

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msinc

476 posts in 583 days


#9 posted 01-05-2018 04:14 PM

I know exactly what those little patch looking pieces are…that’s where the wife caught the old man messing around and was shooting at him. It’s also where the term “patched things up between them” originated.
We have Loblolly, long leaf and Virginia pine around here. Virginia pine might also be what you guys are calling white pine. One difference is that piney smell {among a lot of other things}. Virginia pine has it for sure and it was used around here for building wooden boats. No wooden boat expert, but I do know a few old timers that are and they tell me that you do want Virginia pine but don’t want dark heartwood in a boat. They also say that the trees with the wide dark heartwood were often used for flooring. Just a thought, but that might be what you have there…what we call Virginia pine is easy to spot in the woods because it has short needles and a lot of smaller pine cones. It doesn’t grow real tall like Loblolly and long leaf. It tends to grow slow and crooked and it retains that fairly strong piney smell for a very long time as opposed to long leaf and loblolly which don’t. Beautiful floor by the way!!!

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Gabebell

6 posts in 222 days


#10 posted 01-05-2018 04:25 PM

Thanks! Nice shop and floor!


I m going to suggest the small patches are exactly that: patches. I ve worked over / refurbed / removed pine floors and subfloors quite a bit. Those kinds of fixes are not necessarily common, but I ve seen them. More often, when those floors are covered up by later renovations, holes are filled with wood bits or even covered with pieces of tin or lids of coffee cans, nailed to the floor.

It should refinish beautifully. Here are a few pictures of my pine shop floor.

- Smitty_Cabinetshop


View Gabebell's profile

Gabebell

6 posts in 222 days


#11 posted 01-05-2018 04:28 PM

Hmmm…interesting! I wish I could know for sure what it was…I guess it really doesn’t matter, but it just has me puzzled! I googled heart pine and they definitely have similarities, but I could also see why people would say white pine as well…


I know exactly what those little patch looking pieces are…that s where the wife caught the old man messing around and was shooting at him. It s also where the term “patched things up between them” originated.
We have Loblolly, long leaf and Virginia pine around here. Virginia pine might also be what you guys are calling white pine. One difference is that piney smell {among a lot of other things}. Virginia pine has it for sure and it was used around here for building wooden boats. No wooden boat expert, but I do know a few old timers that are and they tell me that you do want Virginia pine but don t want dark heartwood in a boat. They also say that the trees with the wide dark heartwood were often used for flooring. Just a thought, but that might be what you have there…what we call Virginia pine is easy to spot in the woods because it has short needles and a lot of smaller pine cones. It doesn t grow real tall like Loblolly and long leaf. It tends to grow slow and crooked and it retains that fairly strong piney smell for a very long time as opposed to long leaf and loblolly which don t. Beautiful floor by the way!!!

- msinc


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