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Forum topic by Imakenicefirewood posted 01-04-2018 05:10 PM 591 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Imakenicefirewood

74 posts in 1378 days


01-04-2018 05:10 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question pecan

I was splitting up some of my firewood this week and found these not-so-little guys. They came out of some pecan I got from my brother’s house this last summer. He had it stacked for about a year. They have eaten that pecan up pretty good.

Does anyone know what they are?

They are not eating any of the oak firewood.

Should I be worried about them getting into my pecan tree I have in my yard? The tree is on the other side of the yard, but I sure would hate to have it get infested.

Thanks,


6 replies so far

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BurlyBob

5547 posts in 2288 days


#1 posted 01-04-2018 05:18 PM

We’ve got a borer beetle here that’s reeking havoc on Birch trees. My Birch trees are fine. I’ve been using a systemic pesticide for several years. It might be something you should look into.

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Imakenicefirewood

74 posts in 1378 days


#2 posted 01-04-2018 05:22 PM

I’ve used this before. Maybe it’s time to treat my trees again just to be safe.

https://www.bayeradvanced.com/find-a-product/tree-shrub-care/12-month-tree-shrub-protect-feed

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OnhillWW

130 posts in 1254 days


#3 posted 01-04-2018 05:40 PM

Those are Long Horned Beetles ( family – cerambycidae), named for their long antenna. Specifically a Banded Ash Borer see link below. Generally speaking most wood boring insects attack dead, sick or weakened trees as the tree offers little / less resistance to the attack. That said, “Pests” exist – think Emerald Ash Borer and others who are able to attack healthy trees and ultimately cause their death.

If your tree is healthy I would not worry too much, if its stressed then maybe tack actions to boost tree health and prophylactic pesticide treatments may help.

http://mobugs.blogspot.com/2015/03/

https://pubs.ext.vt.edu/content/dam/pubs_ext_vt_edu/ENTO/ENTO-133/ENTO-133-PDF.pdf

-- Cheap is expensive! - my Dad

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Ron Aylor

2631 posts in 669 days


#4 posted 01-04-2018 05:45 PM

Looks to me like what’s called a Banded Ash Borer. This species generally will not attack a healthy tree, but is attracted to dead, dying, diseased or stressed trees. Hosts of the banded ash borer include ash, hickory (pecan), elm, mesquite and, occasionally, white oak. Guess the just haven’t found the oak yet! I’d suggest a Google search to see what you need to do next. Good luck!

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  https://ronaylor.wordpress.com

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BurlyBob

5547 posts in 2288 days


#5 posted 01-05-2018 12:22 AM

Several years ago I used some stuff Cygon. Really potent and required a little extra protection when pouring the mixture around the tree. Rubber gloves and boots. I haven’t found it around here in years. I’ve moved onto a few other things which I can’t remember the names of. The local farm supply store has a couple of different things. I still stick to using the rubber glove and boots. That ground soaking systemic is the way to go. I just don’t use it on my fruit trees. I see no reason to rent a sprayer very month to get to the tree tops.

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oldwood

136 posts in 1266 days


#6 posted 01-05-2018 04:07 AM

The larva in the picture are what is commonly called “sawyers” in the south. I remember when I was a child the larger timber around our home was cut and after a couple months you could hear them chewing on the the parts left by the loggers.
Oh, and they make good fishbait.

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