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Forum topic by KK1 posted 03-17-2011 09:27 PM 2025 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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KK1

5 posts in 2094 days


03-17-2011 09:27 PM

Hello I’m new to the forum, but have been woodworking since I was a child, I use power tools some, but really like using old hand tools the most and just recently found this site and forum.

I’ve been using wood molding planes for a while (I currently have 30, mostly all Chapin’s), but just obtained a new (new to me) 1820-1850 Chapin 22” wood joining plane in great shape.

Typically with my molding planes a light tap on the back and the irons slip right out, but the iron in this plane is stuck so bad that I have not been able to remove it so I can sharpen it and flatten the sole.

I’m curious if anyone has any idea’s to gently persuade the iron out of the plane?


17 replies so far

View Dan's profile

Dan

3630 posts in 2347 days


#1 posted 03-17-2011 10:52 PM

I would lube the blade with something and try and wiggle it out with a vise grip plier. Thats my only guess.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

555 posts in 2748 days


#2 posted 03-18-2011 01:49 AM

A more humid environment will help. Wrap it over night in a damp cloth? I’m not sure how that would work because I’ve never done it. I have clamped a smooth plane, toe on one jaw and heel on the other, in a vise to free up an iron. A clamp might work on a longer plane. I’d try increasing the moisture content of the wood first, though.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3201 days


#3 posted 03-18-2011 01:59 AM

I would try DECREASING the moisture content of the wood. A tight container filled with dessicant maybe, or perhaps to leave it out in a solar kiln or other method of lowering the moisture content. Got a moisture meter? You’d want the wood to shrink, not swell up. Nice plane, I have a few Chapin’s myself but they are molding planes.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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lwllms

555 posts in 2748 days


#4 posted 03-18-2011 02:04 AM

poopiekat,

The problem is that the wood HAS shrunk around the iron. This needs to be reversed. The top and sole of the plane are the flat sawn surfaces and increasing the moisture content will cause the plane to swell in width. Because there’s far more wood in the overall width of the plane than in the combined width of the cheeks, increasing the moisture content of the plane’s body will make the escapement a little wider. This is what is needed to release the iron.

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poopiekat

4225 posts in 3201 days


#5 posted 03-18-2011 02:26 AM

lwwlms: I’ve noticed that the wooden planes I’ve had shipped to my house sometimes have irons that are stuck. Once acclimated to my rather dry shop, ,the problem goes away by itself. This after being outside in transit for a week or 2. I’m just presenting my observations of fact, but KK1 is certainly free to choose. I clued in to his statement that ‘he just obtained…’which suggests that the plane either may have been in transit, or perhaps came from a different environment.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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lwllms

555 posts in 2748 days


#6 posted 03-18-2011 05:18 AM

“Why argue a point when you are wrong?”

Jonathan,
The plane has shrunk in width, the iron didn’t. That’s the problem. If the op can cause the wood to swell, it will release the iron. Perhaps you have more experience with wooden planes than me but I seriously doubt it.

Larry Williams
http://www.planemaker.com

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lwllms

555 posts in 2748 days


#7 posted 03-18-2011 07:01 AM

Jonathan,

If the moisture content of the wood goes down, the wood shrinks and points A and B will be closer together. So, if the plane drys more, the iron will be held more securely. If the moisture content increases, the wood will expand and points A and B will be further apart. The latter will release the iron.

View 747DRVR's profile

747DRVR

199 posts in 2823 days


#8 posted 03-18-2011 07:22 AM

At first I agreed with most of the people here that the plane needed to get dryer,but after the last post I think lwllms is right.

View KK1's profile

KK1

5 posts in 2094 days


#9 posted 03-18-2011 03:13 PM

Thank you all for the quick responses,

poopiekat-you are correct I recieved it via usps on thursday, opened it and immediately jumped (kid in a candy store syndrome)

Dan- I don’t want to mark up the iron with the vise grip teeth

after trying to tap it, my first inclination was also that the wood needed to be dryer, but based on lwllms’s explanation I broke out the calipers and points A-B at the iron is 1 mm wider than points A-B at the front of the iron box, I also see a hairline crack in the corner just behind the iron, which also leads me to believe the wood is dry and shrank around the iron.

I think I’ll let is stabilize in the shop first, then try to increase moisture per Larry’s recommendation (unfortunately I don’t have a moisture meter, perhaps it’s time to get one)

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4457 posts in 3427 days


#10 posted 03-18-2011 05:37 PM

Well, based on some of the “advise” I’ve read here, why not just set fire to the plane. The iron will come free.
Note to self: Remember! Vice grips are always a last resort after dynamite has been used.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View KK1's profile

KK1

5 posts in 2094 days


#11 posted 03-18-2011 07:06 PM

Bill,

My first thought was to cut the plane in half, but your fire method would work.

Besides fire, dynamite and general destruction of the plane, do you have any constructive advice?

View KK1's profile

KK1

5 posts in 2094 days


#12 posted 03-18-2011 07:09 PM

I appreciate everyone’s passion,

but I’m really looking for a “gentle” none destructive means of removing the iron without damage to the iron.

To that point I’m going to take it slow and start by allowing it to sit in my shop and stabilize to a known environment. After that I’ll carefully take the next steps.

View JBoss's profile

JBoss

37 posts in 2514 days


#13 posted 03-22-2011 11:59 PM

Ok, not a wood plane master here but lwllms idea seems to be on point. plus just as an aside, debating how a wooden plane works with one of of the founders of clark and williams is sorta like debating a Stanley no4 with leonard bailey

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

4225 posts in 3201 days


#14 posted 03-23-2011 07:32 PM

KK: As mentioned on a similar thread, I noticed that it looks like somebody retro-fitted a chipbreaker to the cutter of this plane, and forced the assembly into a slot broached for one cutter and nothing else. with this in mind, and wishing to preserve the integrity of the body and iron, I’d consider something like an ’s’-hook in the hole of the iron, affixing the plane body in a vise, and a slide hammer to yank the blade free. Then I’d use a ‘plane float’ to properly re-size the body to accommodate the chipbreaker, if you elect to keep it as you found it. Perhaps somebody was trying to contend with blade chatter, or too much digging in. This would have been remedied better by a cutter of correct thickness, and/or re-soling the plane with a narrower mouth opening. Funny how even plane-makers overlooked the presence of the nonstandard chipbreaker, eh?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View Jeff in Huntersville's profile

Jeff in Huntersville

404 posts in 2661 days


#15 posted 03-23-2011 07:39 PM

Could you put a spreader clamp in the body and ever so gently see if you can force the plane walls away from the iron?

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