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Equipment SAFETY tips: The Router

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Forum topic by MsDebbieP posted 03-17-2011 08:11 PM 1626 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3624 days


03-17-2011 08:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: safety router

Safety in the shop tips for the router.

What are some tips to work safely on and around a router?

(See all SAFETY TIP GATEWAYS here)

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)


17 replies so far

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RexMcKinnon

2593 posts in 2659 days


#1 posted 03-17-2011 08:19 PM

The obvious that applies to all tools. Unplug it when doing anything other than cutting something with it.

-- If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail!

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RexMcKinnon

2593 posts in 2659 days


#2 posted 03-17-2011 08:20 PM

Never go between the fence and the bit… with the work piece.

Never go anywhare near the bit with your fingers. duhhh ;)

-- If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail!

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RexMcKinnon

2593 posts in 2659 days


#3 posted 03-17-2011 08:24 PM

Don’t remove too much material with one pass. Light cuts are cleanest and safe.

-- If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail!

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

19178 posts in 2138 days


#4 posted 03-17-2011 08:28 PM

Hearing & eye protection!
DC is crucial!
Make sure bit is properly seated and tightened in the collet.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

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patron

13535 posts in 2804 days


#5 posted 03-17-2011 08:32 PM

always ‘climb cut’ when possible
(the cutting edge of the bit moving into the work)

don’t cut ‘down hill’ unless absolutely necessary
and with control
(when the bit grabs the work
and wants to ‘walk’ it down the work
(it can grab the tool right out of your hand running)

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

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juniorjock

1930 posts in 3229 days


#6 posted 03-17-2011 08:35 PM

If something “seems” wrong, there probably “is” something wrong. Stop, unplug and look everything over. In other words, if it doesn’t feel right, don’t do it.
- JJ

View mainwoodworks's profile

mainwoodworks

112 posts in 2112 days


#7 posted 03-17-2011 09:43 PM

Keep the collet clean, the work area clean, and your mind on what you are doing. Listen to the router if it sounds a little different, stop and find out why. Remember the router is one of the fastest spinning tools you will work with and things happen fast.

-- Measure twice, cut once, and hope for the best.

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cabmaker

1507 posts in 2272 days


#8 posted 03-17-2011 09:49 PM

No offense to anyone, Im sure it was a typo, but I would not do any cliimb cutting untiil you have a good feel for the router.

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devann

2200 posts in 2156 days


#9 posted 03-17-2011 11:03 PM

Check bits for damage before each use. NEVER alter a bit in any way. I learned that one the hard way. I altered the bearing on a slot cutter and as soon as I turned it on out it came and put a nice divot in my knee. Bent the bit too.
Start shollow with straight cut bits, if you try to start to to deep the stock will slowly pull the bit out of the collect.

-- Darrell, making more sawdust than I know what to do with

View Greedo's profile

Greedo

470 posts in 2424 days


#10 posted 03-17-2011 11:09 PM

follow the max rpm instructions written on the bits, or use the diagram from the router manual!
when i was making a dado cut wth a verry wide bit that can’t go faster than 10000 rpm i mistakingly increased the speed while it was running and the router started jumping until the bit came loose and jumped out!

View Dez's profile

Dez

1162 posts in 3541 days


#11 posted 03-17-2011 11:18 PM

Never pull your router out of your table without turning off the power FIRST!
Personal experience AND the scars to prove it!

-- Folly ever comes cloaked in opportunity!

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MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 3624 days


#12 posted 03-17-2011 11:21 PM

someone, here, posted once that they had used some cheap router bits and they shattered – very dangerous. “You get what you pay for” applies.

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Roger's profile

Roger

19868 posts in 2267 days


#13 posted 03-18-2011 02:28 AM

I agree w/everyone that said to take small passes, don’t take the whole depth of a cut all at once.
Don’t let your bits get too “gummed-up”. a toothbrush, or a soft wire brush will knock off gum, if there is not a large buildup.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

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surfin2

51276 posts in 2599 days


#14 posted 03-18-2011 03:08 AM

Never go between the fence and the bit… with the work piece.
I do this with out any problems, I just make sure I do two things…
Feed it from the opposite way and keep it against the fence with feather boards…
I’ve only done this with just straight bits, like a small jointer…

-- Rick

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

14940 posts in 2153 days


#15 posted 03-18-2011 05:33 AM

Use wooden clamps[not fingers]to hold small parts on the router table.Take very shallow cots when routing end grain as the bit really wants to grab end grain.Routing end grain on a small piece is really the time to get out your wooden clamps.MY scars remind me daily !

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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