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Forum topic by JP4LSU posted 01-03-2018 05:53 PM 810 views 1 time favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JP4LSU

67 posts in 110 days


01-03-2018 05:53 PM

Topic tags/keywords: plane sharpening setup

Hey guys,
I’m venturing off into hand work. I’ve purchased a complete set of Narex beveled chisels and Mortise chisels, sharpening stones, sharpening system/guides, and have a Ryoba and Dozuki saws in the mail and plan on getting a couple of other western saws in the future.

So I bought 2 planes from another woodworker. Unfortunately he sold me 2 Stanley planes that he didn’t need instead of his Lie Nielsen planes for some reason. HAHA!

Anyway, my plan is to check or clean up the surface of the planes. I believe the 1st plane is a # 4 and the other is a #5. What would be a good source for leaning the set up and sharpening of the plane and then using it? This could be literature or video.

My first real job will be to build a Roubo workbench which will give me lots of practice on planning, mortise/tenon joints, and dovetail joint at a breadboard or something.
Thanks for the help,
JP


25 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1200 posts in 1958 days


#1 posted 01-03-2018 06:14 PM

There are lots of videos a out setting planes upon YouTube. Paul Sellers has a set about building a bench with nothing but hand tools.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View JP4LSU's profile

JP4LSU

67 posts in 110 days


#2 posted 01-03-2018 06:45 PM

Thanks Brian. I’ve been watching some of Sellers stuff. I enjoy waching him.
I have not seen all the workbench build and it looks like he has a 2 workbench builds.

I have watched some of his sharpening videos also.
-JP

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

15280 posts in 2582 days


#3 posted 01-03-2018 06:55 PM

Chris Schwarz has an earlier book, “Handplane Essentials,” that is an eye-opener if you’re new to hand planes. Lots of foundational information in that book, and it’s a good read as well. Highly recommended. Also, Lumberjock Don Wilwol has a website, “timetestedtools,” that has a ton of info re: plane refurbs as well.

Here on LJs, there are long-standing threads on benches, hand planes, saws, chisels, tool restorations, etc. Jump into any/all of them and you’ll get input on specific questions too.

Good luck, welcome to the Slippery Slope!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive --

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

164 posts in 604 days


#4 posted 01-03-2018 07:21 PM

+1 for Paul Sellers. He has a ton of videos and blogs on plane tuning and setup. He refines the edges of new plane soles with a file, which is very smart and I’d have never thought of doing, but makes so much sense once you see it.
I built a Sellers workbench, it’s great too, seemed like less work than some of the fancy ones.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View JP4LSU's profile

JP4LSU

67 posts in 110 days


#5 posted 01-03-2018 09:12 PM

Thanks Smitty and john. I’ll dig around the threads for info and Dons information also.

I might see if I can find a copy of Schwarz’s book.
Thank you for the info,
JP

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2495 posts in 611 days


#6 posted 01-04-2018 12:37 AM

JP, I will offer this to you for what it’s worth … read as many different books as you can get your hands on, BUT then develop you own methods and techniques. Hand tool woodworking is a kin to theology … no one has a handle on all of it! There are many approaches and schools of thought, and that  is what makes it an art! Fine your own style, your own rhythm, and what works  for you.

-- Ron in Lilburn, Georgia.  Knowing how to use a tool is more important than the tool in and of itself.

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

589 posts in 403 days


#7 posted 01-04-2018 12:45 AM

No way would I tackle a Roubo bench as my first project. I’ve built three workbenches and still don’t know if my skills are up to a Roubo. AI’d like to think that I am getting there though. : )

View NoSpace's profile

NoSpace

120 posts in 1204 days


#8 posted 01-04-2018 01:29 AM

I’m not a seasoned wood-worker and I own a single #4 handplane, but I’m finding after a little practice I can dial that thing in pretty quickly and get results so satisfying that hand-planing has become one of my favorite operations. (when I don’t rush it, which happens a lot unfortunately, and I end up nicks etc.)

If your planes are decent, then armed with the most basic youtube info, you will likely just figure it out after a few hours of practice.

However, I have to say, that the information overload from watching a couple hours of handplane videos on youtube didn’t really pay off for me. I began with a cheap Stanley I had laying around and went through all the tune-up procedures and I got it working much better than it originally did, but it was obviously was not producing.

I had no point of reference. Two minutes of hands-on coaching with proper setup from a pro would probably be worth 20 hours of youtube videos. If you don’t have that, then what? For me, I dropped 120$ or so on a Stanley SW that was getting great reviews, although, getting one Lie Nielson that’s right straight from the box may have been a better idea for a first plane in order to get a proper benchmark. I still don’t REALLY know how well my plane is set up because I have nothing to compare it to.

With a much better starting point, a few hours of practice and making adjustments, the right setup became obvious. I use a fine and extra fine diamond with a honing guide, make sure the shavings come through the center and thin as possible to get a stream going, and that’s it. It’s just my opinion that if you start down the path of 12 different grits of sand paper or big investments in stones, need to file the sole etc., then either you’re looking beyond the mark or the plane quality is questionable, and it’s going to be tough to drastically improve it without having any kind of benchmark as to proper operation.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

19715 posts in 2646 days


#9 posted 01-04-2018 01:49 AM

Not sure where JP is located…..if he is within a reasonable driving distance, he is more than welcome to stop in at my shop.

Bring the plane along, and we both will get it working. You can also try a few other planes out that I have, and use…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View JP4LSU's profile

JP4LSU

67 posts in 110 days


#10 posted 01-04-2018 03:15 AM

Blaster and Ron, thanks for the advice. I think I’m somewhat intimidated by the plane and setting one up. Blaster I probably am crazy for wanting to tackle a Roubo bench. But I need a bench to do real wood work. Otherwise I’d be practicing on a kitchen table I plan on building. LOL.
Ron, I think what I need to do is glean info from various sources that is consistent between all of them. Then get to work.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1200 posts in 1958 days


#11 posted 01-04-2018 03:23 AM

I suffered with a bunch of make shift bench substitutes before finally building the stumpy nubs version of a roubo (slightly modified from his plans). Oh what a difference. IF you really think you are going to make tables and other furniture, a good bench will make those projects easier. But a roubo with hand tools only is a big project!

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View JP4LSU's profile

JP4LSU

67 posts in 110 days


#12 posted 01-04-2018 03:43 AM

NoSpace, thanks for the advice. Having a pro walk you through an entire setup and doing actual coaching on planing would be invaluable.

There is a guy on CL in McKinney that refurbished planes and invites people to stop and learn a few things. He sounds like a real advocate for it. But he is 1 1/2 hours away.

Bandit, I’m in Fort Worth. I really appreciate the offer. Where are you located.
-JP

View JP4LSU's profile

JP4LSU

67 posts in 110 days


#13 posted 01-04-2018 03:48 AM



But a roubo with hand tools only is a big project!

Brian

- bbasiaga

Yes it is. I’m concerned about the planing aspect of it. I will probably end buying s2s lumber will use the cicular saw to rip and cut to length the laminated boards, etc. But joints will be hand and planing laminated boards by hand

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

19715 posts in 2646 days


#14 posted 01-04-2018 04:56 AM

Might be too long of a drive….Logan County area, Ohio.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9249 posts in 1449 days


#15 posted 01-04-2018 05:13 AM


There is a guy on CL in McKinney that refurbished planes and invites people to stop and learn a few things. He sounds like a real advocate for it. But he is 1 1/2 hours away

- JP4LSU

I found out firsthand how much a couple hours with someone knowledgeable can speed you along. I try to visit folks as much as I can and it’s usually 1 to 1-1/2 drive. Always worth it though.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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