LumberJocks

Bandsaw size question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Hermit posted 01-03-2018 05:14 PM 727 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Hermit's profile

Hermit

187 posts in 1379 days


01-03-2018 05:14 PM

Ready to purchase a benchtop bandsaw. Are the benchtop models big enough/powerful enough to make bandsaw boxes? I will be getting a 14 inch bandsaw down the road but for now also want a smaller benchtop saw.

-- I'm like the farmer's duck. If it don't rain, I'll walk.


15 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3701 days


#1 posted 01-03-2018 05:39 PM

You’ll need one in a size you can get narrow
scrolling blades for.

Cool blocks are kind of out of fashion these
days. They do have an advantage in scrolling
cuts though because they can be closed
around a scrolling blade. You might want
to get a saw you can buy the blocks for.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1236 posts in 2048 days


#2 posted 01-03-2018 05:44 PM

I had a benchtop for a while, but it never made any boxes with it. Just look for one with the biggest motor you can afford, that has a blade size that allows you the biggest possible selection, and one with adjustable guides (preferably above and below the table).

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

361 posts in 1785 days


#3 posted 01-03-2018 07:09 PM

I had an older Craftsman 9” bandsaw that was given to me, but I never made a bandsaw box with it. I ended up replacing it with a Laguna 14-12 when the plastic tension knob broke.

I don’t want to discourage you from buying the smaller saw—it may be completely viable for your needs—it would be better if someone who has used one to make a bandsaw box would comment. That being said….

I would be concerned that a bench top bandsaw (~ 1/3 hp) would not have the power to cut through thick wood (GT 6”) or the impact to the depth of cut if the table is tilted. Consider the availability of blade choices (width and TPI) for the small saw. Consider the costs in spending money now (for the small saw) and again later (on the 14” saw)—including any blades or other related items (e.g. guides). Consider if you’ll really have a need for the smaller saw once you do get the 14” saw.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

206 posts in 694 days


#4 posted 01-03-2018 07:18 PM

The bandsaw is so useful once you have it… the ability to resaw can save you so much $ or open up new possibilities. So maybe go ahead and get the 14” now. It’s cheaper in the long run to just buy one good tool.

ON THE OTHER HAND:

I have a 17” bandsaw, a real beast, but when it’s set up and tuned for milling logs, I don’t want to rig it all down and change blades just to knock out some quick curve cuts, then rig it back up for milling. Makes me wish I HAD a small (9” ish) benchtop BS just for the savings in time and setup hassle.

So maybe, go ahead with a cheaper smaller saw, then buy a bigger one later and have the best of both worlds!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

995 posts in 2640 days


#5 posted 01-03-2018 07:24 PM

Checkout the porter cable 14” bandsaw at lowes. I have one for my second saw that I put a carter scrolling guide and an eight inch blade. It has a 1.5 hp motor and works great for making bandsaw boxes. It cost $399 for the saw and $80 for the carter guide.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4830 posts in 2405 days


#6 posted 01-03-2018 07:25 PM

The problem with band saws smaller than 14” is that the blades tend to overheat when sawing thick stock. Band saw boxes use thick stock, so that is a problem. You can compensate by slowing the the feed rate and plan on buying lots of blades, cause you’ll break ‘em when they over heat.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7768 posts in 2967 days


#7 posted 01-03-2018 07:40 PM



The problem with band saws smaller than 14” is that the blades tend to overheat when sawing thick stock. Band saw boxes use thick stock, so that is a problem. You can compensate by slowing the the feed rate and plan on buying lots of blades, cause you ll break em when they over heat.
- bondogaposis

+10

A very good point. I have both a rikon 14in and 10in bandsaws. Started with the larger one and eventually picked up the 10in for smaller stuff and curves. Bandsaw boxes are often 3in or more, and that is a lot for a small 10in bandsaw to deal with.

I would recommend starting with the 14in BS.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1564 posts in 3120 days


#8 posted 01-03-2018 08:11 PM

my first bs was a table top 3 pully job, and it was ok for crafting cutting small pieces, but gave it away as you will not be able to fix drift, it will not hold a line and you will be frustrated beyond belief.

I’ve got two bs’s now. One Is a 2hp 17” griz with a resaw blade on it, and it does a great job of veneers and resaw.

I’ve got a 1934 Delta 14” BS, that I have set up with a small blade with carter’s stablizer. Works’ fantastic on small tight curve work.

So depending on the need you have a world of options.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1236 posts in 2048 days


#9 posted 01-03-2018 08:27 PM

I will now do what I hate others doing to me….

There are often good deals on Craigslist for 14” bandsaw.

While I almost never find anything good on CL, i can say the one thing I have seen multiple times are 14” bandsaw. Of course, I already have one so that might be the reason why they seem to be available.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10476 posts in 3701 days


#10 posted 01-03-2018 08:32 PM

In Sacramento you’re near a warehouse where
auction machinery is moved all the time. Keep
an eye on MachineryMax.com and you’ll see
all kinds of interesting machines moving through
that warehouse. I’ve seen 14” band saws sell
for $100 or so on that site.

View Hermit's profile

Hermit

187 posts in 1379 days


#11 posted 01-03-2018 08:54 PM

Thanks for all the help and replies. I may just go ahead and go with the 14” now any skip the benchtop. Been checking Craigslist daily but haven’t heard of machinerymax. Thanks again…

-- I'm like the farmer's duck. If it don't rain, I'll walk.

View NoSpace's profile

NoSpace

127 posts in 1294 days


#12 posted 01-04-2018 01:50 AM

Like Bill I started with a 10” craftsman. With the “woodslicer” blade people love around here, it actually did a great job with resawing up to its full 4.5” and that includes exotics. I’ve never made a bandsaw box but it seems to me maximum height will be an issue on a small saw? Well, the problem for me was blade life for resawing was non-existent, the performance was tied to the expensive woodslicer because of lower tension needed, and so I could have spent lots of money on blades for limited capabilities.

I don’t like to spend lots of money on tools unless really critical. I still have a jobsite table saw and no reason to upgrade at this time, but in contrast, the bigger bandsaw became really critical so I got the 14-12 as well. Not as an expert, but I would suggest not only getting a 14”, but just go all the way if you’re really serious and get one that you don’t need riser blocks for if you ever need more the 6” of clearance.

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1564 posts in 3120 days


#13 posted 01-04-2018 06:33 PM



Thanks for all the help and replies. I may just go ahead and go with the 14” now any skip the benchtop. Been checking Craigslist daily but haven t heard of machinerymax. Thanks again…

- Hermit

Hey i’d recommend searchtempest.com It will search surrounding CL’s. Thats how I got my 1934 delta. I was checking multiple times a day when it showed up. I called the guy and took half a day vacation and stopped by an ATM to get cash.

When I showed up and it ran, the guy laughed and said he must have had a hundred calls after I called him.

Moral of the story check often and strike while the iron’s hot. Cheers

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View MikeUT's profile

MikeUT

170 posts in 1413 days


#14 posted 01-04-2018 08:03 PM

+1 on craigslist. I started with a 9” Ryobi bandsaw, it was one of my first purchases after I started woodworking. Tabletop saws are very underpowered, mine often stalled cutting through 4/4 hardwood and even on 2×4’s. I wouldn’t even attempt a bandsaw box, at least on the saw I had. I bought a Used 14” Delta from the 70’s 6 months later for $275. I wish I would have started on craigslist…

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3171 posts in 3162 days


#15 posted 01-06-2018 02:04 AM

I have a 9” craftsman I bought many years ago that I use for small stuff, and a 12” that I inherited later for doing bigger things. It’s handy to have the little one to cut out carving projects, and dedicate the 12” to resawing.

-- Random Orbital Nailer

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com