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Forum topic by MrRon posted 01-01-2018 08:12 PM 861 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

5202 posts in 3447 days


01-01-2018 08:12 PM

I am planning on building/rebuilding some power tool work stands to make my shop more efficient. Although I have a 1200 SF shop, I want all my tools to be moveable with the exception of my cabinet saw and RAS. I propose to incorporate a small DC within the base of each power tool. The DC I now have will only service my saw. I’m looking at small DC’s that cost around $30 to be built into the power tool base. Some modifications will be made to the DC’s to accommodate them. I figure it will be more effective than running ductwork all around a 1200 SF shop. I also have plans to build a portable workbench, 30”x84” that will be adjustable in height. I will post blogs as I progress, but be patient with me. Due to the cold that is now enveloping my neck of the woods, I will be confining my activities to designing on my computer.


15 replies so far

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EarlS

1943 posts in 2551 days


#1 posted 01-01-2018 08:20 PM

Seems like a lot of work to install multiple DC’s and then more work to empty them when they fill up.

Consider getting some hose and move it between the various pieces of equipment. I have a DC hooked to the saw with a blast gate and then on the other side of the tee, another blast gate with 20’ or so of hose so I can hook it to whatever piece of equipment I’m using. When I run the planer, I add a garbage can dust collector to the end of the hose and run the planer dust hose into it.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

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MrRon

5202 posts in 3447 days


#2 posted 01-01-2018 09:29 PM

I understand what you are saying. I would like all my tools to be self contained. I want to do this as a feasibility study and considering using old vacumn cleaner parts which I have many.

View ralbuck's profile

ralbuck

5419 posts in 2470 days


#3 posted 01-01-2018 10:04 PM

Good luck on all projects. Even with a very large EXPENSIVE dust collector; it is a challenge and I am many times running small vacs at the same time too.

-- Wood rescue is good for the environment and me! just rjR

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DIY_Guy

3 posts in 346 days


#4 posted 01-04-2018 05:06 AM

I agree ralbuck, I have been researching some of the best shop vacs out there for the money. I found the below post provided some pretty affordable options on Amazon. Anyone on here have any experience with any of these models?

The festool seems way too expensive, but I am curious.

https://perfectcutsandmiters.com/dust-control/best-shop-vacs-dust-extractors/

Chris

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MrRon

5202 posts in 3447 days


#5 posted 01-04-2018 05:01 PM

Matthias Wandel has some videos on U-tube on construction of small dust collectors individually sized for each machine. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lkTVwE_8oHM. That’s where I got the inspiration to pursue this. I am taking it a step further by incorporating the DC into the base of the tool rather than having two pieces to move around. Having a mobile, self contained power tool intrigues me.

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DIY_Guy

3 posts in 346 days


#6 posted 01-07-2018 05:52 PM

Nice MrRon, thanks for sharing that video.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1307 posts in 2964 days


#7 posted 01-08-2018 03:02 AM

I put most of my machines on casters a few years back as I was running out of space. The lesser used machines are parked in an out of the way area I call the “parking lot” and can be quickly rolled out to use, then rolled back. great space saver and its quick to get a machine into position. They all stay plugged into the wall so you don’t have to deal with that.

Suggestion: Go to Harbor Freight for casters. Really good industrial casters cheap. I even put my 800lb Hammer sliding table saw on them (it does take some effort to get it to move, though). Also, I find that locking casters are not needed on most machines. The weight keeps them in place on a concrete floor unless you are applying waaay to much pressure making a cut. Moving while using has never been a problem with me.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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MrRon

5202 posts in 3447 days


#8 posted 01-08-2018 06:44 PM

Locking casters have always been a problem on bases for lighter machines. The casters swivel so the locking lever hides under the base, and depending on the type of shoes you are wearing, it becomes impossible to step on the brake lever. I’m going to try to solve that problem.

View Walker's profile

Walker

150 posts in 675 days


#9 posted 01-08-2018 07:04 PM

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Knockonit

477 posts in 405 days


#10 posted 01-08-2018 07:15 PM

I used two swivel casters and two fixed directional, using fixed in 990 degree from direction i was pushing material or product thru tool, this way, the fixed wheels acted as a stop, the swivels on the outboard edge so you can still manuever the equipt around.

View rbrjr1's profile

rbrjr1

170 posts in 409 days


#11 posted 01-09-2018 05:10 PM

I would think the dual locking casters would be the way to go. regardless of how youve positioned your equipment, you should be able to rotate them out and lock all four

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

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MrRon

5202 posts in 3447 days


#12 posted 01-09-2018 10:18 PM



I would think the dual locking casters would be the way to go. regardless of how youve positioned your equipment, you should be able to rotate them out and lock all four

- rbrjr1


After moving a stand around, have you ever been able to lock all 4 casters? The brakes on some are always hidden under the base and cannot be activated by your foot.

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rbrjr1

170 posts in 409 days


#13 posted 01-10-2018 08:41 PM

I can usually lift up gently at a corner and rotate the lock out at each corner with my foot..

even on the table saw station my dad has at his shop that is easily over 1,000 lbs.

-- only an idiot dismisses an intelligent statement because they dont know anything about the person delivering it.

View MT_Stringer's profile

MT_Stringer

3183 posts in 3434 days


#14 posted 01-10-2018 10:15 PM

@MrRon – I know you already know this, but the planer and the joiner generate a lot chips when they are in use. I connect mine to a blast gate with a 4 inch hose. The 30 gallon drum can fill quickly when running the planer for any length of time. Since my shop is small, and really congested, the hose is about my only solution for the big chippers! I move the hose to which ever tool I will be using. It gets stored under the planer.

Good luck. Post some pics of your set up when you get it going.

Hose storage

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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Planeman40

1307 posts in 2964 days


#15 posted 01-11-2018 01:41 AM

I have a large Delta shop vacuum and a hose that is about 5” in diameter for my table saw. I had the idea of setting it up for my thickness planer until I found dealing with that hose is like wrestling an anaconda. Alas, I just leave it hooked up to the table saw and sweep up the planer mess. I don’t use my planer all that much anyway. Anybody else with this problem?

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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