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Who are todays most influential furniture designers?

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Forum topic by Damian Penney posted 03-16-2011 06:37 PM 2231 views 3 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2629 days


03-16-2011 06:37 PM

Is any designer working today fulfilling the role that Krenov, Maloof and Nakashima played in their prime? Which contemporary designer has influenced you?

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso


16 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

7467 posts in 2285 days


#1 posted 03-16-2011 07:39 PM

Michael Fortune, Paul Schurch.

The guys you cited all published books. That’s partly why they
are regarded as highly influential. They also all preceeded the 1970s
craft revival and were positioned as elders as it went on to flower
into the woodworking we know today.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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DLCW

522 posts in 1292 days


#2 posted 03-16-2011 08:21 PM

David J. Marks.

His work is absolutely beautiful.

-- Don, Diamond Lake Custom Woodworks - http://www.dlwoodworks.com - "If you make something idiot proof, all they do is make a better idiot"

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hObOmOnk

1381 posts in 2765 days


#3 posted 03-16-2011 08:26 PM

Darrell Peart – THE Greene & Greene genius
Warren May of Berea, Ky – guardian of authentic Kentucky fine cabinetry
Don Weber of Paint Lick, Ky – the Kentucky bodger
Brian Boggs of North Carolina by way of Berea, Ky – chairman of the chairs
Gary Knox Bennett – the art furniture artist’s artist
Kevin Rodel – Wright done right
Jay van Arsdale of California by way of Kentucky – the Sensei of the western daiku movement
David Wright at Hindman, Ky – the Windsor Chair wizard
Mike Angel of London, Ky – the rocking chair renegade
Chuck Bender – watch this guy grow better and better

-- 温故知新

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john

2293 posts in 3019 days


#4 posted 03-16-2011 10:29 PM

This question seems kinda like a loaded question because there are so many different aspects to woodworking not just furniture building . I personally don,t copy anyone’s style nor am i inspired by anyone one else,s work.
I am still 100 % a woodworker and i think i AM to birdhouse building as Maloof is to building his chairs .
I believe everyone should try and create their own style if they can but hey that is just me ;-)

-- John in Belgrave (Website) http://www.extremebirdhouse.com , http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=112698715866

View matt garcia's profile

matt garcia

1822 posts in 2309 days


#5 posted 03-17-2011 01:37 AM

David J Marks. I wish someone who knows him could convince him to join!!

-- Matt Garcia Wannabe Period Furniture Maker, Houston TX

View Don's profile

Don

506 posts in 1710 days


#6 posted 03-17-2011 05:35 AM

Darrell Peart

-- Don - I wood work if I could. Redmond WA.

View Viktor's profile

Viktor

447 posts in 2056 days


#7 posted 03-17-2011 06:37 AM

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a1Jim

112030 posts in 2215 days


#8 posted 03-17-2011 06:51 AM

Thos. Moser

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2629 days


#9 posted 03-17-2011 07:23 AM

I think Loren might be getting to the root of what I’m getting at here – the men I mentioned went beyond just being fine craftsmen they brought – or at least popularized a specific philosophy that is oft repeated.

While a number of the people mentioned here are indeed exceptional craftsmen I’m not sure that any of them are producing truly iconic work. The Maloof rocker, Krenov cabinet, and Nakashima tables go beyond being well crafted – at this point they are pretty much archetypes.

With regards some of the folks mentioned – Darrel Peart while doing truly exceptional work is reproducing Greene & Greene design themes. David Marks is great, and woodworks was definitely an inspiration to myself, but I don’t feel as though he particularly has a defining style and that goes for a lot of the folks mentioned – great craftsmen with solid bodies of work – but lacking in an overarching philosophy.

Viktor – haven’t gotten through all those links yet but I will (I love J Rustens work and have mentioned it here previously)

Anyway keep em coming :) Always interesting to see the work of master woodworkers even if they haven’t quite reached the giddy heights of the guys I mentioned.

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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Viktor

447 posts in 2056 days


#10 posted 03-17-2011 08:10 AM

Damian, good point about endlessly replicating a style. I purposely excluded craftsmen who do this, although I like their work. What precludes many makers from developing a style is working for commission (in order to make living), which means following customer or designer’s specs instead of developing own ideas.

P.S. Rusten keeps changing his site, and now strangely enough his best work, Palo Alto chair, is not shown there.

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Viktor

447 posts in 2056 days


#11 posted 03-17-2011 05:26 PM

BTW, talking about a distinctive stile, Benji Reyes here at LJ has it. Whenever I scroll through projects I always know its him without reading the title.

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Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2629 days


#12 posted 03-17-2011 05:28 PM

Viktor – I can see commissions getting in the way of developing a style – makes sense – and interesting that the Palo Alto is missing. Perhaps he got tired of making them.

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

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Damian Penney

1140 posts in 2629 days


#13 posted 03-17-2011 05:28 PM

Agreed Benji is great and definitely distinctive.

-- I am always doing that which I can not do, in order that I may learn how to do it. - Pablo Picasso

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4930 posts in 1480 days


#14 posted 02-01-2012 04:59 PM

Damien,

Looking around to see how many “Art Furniture” blogs there are on LJ’s, and ran across yours. Andyboy had suggested the book “Furnitue with Soul” by Savage. It is inspirational! Includes many of Victor’s suggestions.

What distiguishes furniture from Art? If I sit on my artwork I can’t see it? LOL Then there are the blurry areas. My journey is to go through the blur.

I’m starting to understand Krenov’s personal discussion on craftsman vs designers. Trying to learn both and see where that takes me?

What about birdhouses, and boxes? Andy and Greg are up there with Benji?

When is a box not a box or a chair not a chair?

gotta go to my day job LOL

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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miles125

2179 posts in 2643 days


#15 posted 02-01-2012 05:15 PM

Woodwork is sort of like music. Which designer gets the most publicity (and therefore most influential) isn’t neccessarily the best out there. It merely tells us who is superior at a marketing plan.

-- "The way to make a small fortune in woodworking- start with a large one"

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