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Forum topic by jasoncarpentry posted 1230 days ago 1122 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jasoncarpentry

111 posts in 1256 days


1230 days ago

OK, I’m finishing the end-grain cutting board I asked about a few days ago. My attempts at sanding & planing the board resulted in one good side and one terrible side. I’ve covered the terrible side with two pieces of 1/4” thick, book-matched, solid maple. Needless to say, this’ll be the bottom and will never be used as a cutting surface. I’ll add “feet” just to make this clear.

I know that the finish for the working surface should be mineral oil, plus a mixture of beeswax & mineral oil for good measure. And I read some time ago that, when you apply a finish to one side of a piece of wood, you should do the same to the other side to avoid differences in moisture penetration, etc. HOWEVER, I’d really like to apply a tough, permanent, waterproof finish to the solid bottom. I’m thinking of satin polyurethane.

Any thoughts?

-- Jim in Tennessee


6 replies so far

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kpo101

32 posts in 1230 days


#1 posted 1230 days ago

You said (My attempts at sanding & planing the board resulted in one good side and one terrible side.) Just how terrible is the bad side? How thick is the board? There are ways to straighten rough sides especially if you have a good side with a simple router and jig. I also build end grain boards, one type is in the picture by my name.

-- When the problem becomes just too much, There is always the directions!! Karl O. of Louisiana

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jasoncarpentry

111 posts in 1256 days


#2 posted 1230 days ago

The bad side is VERY bad! it’s gouged and chipped out from my clumsy attempts at planing and sanding (using a hand-held belt sander). I finally took it to my local cabinet shop, and he did a terrific job on the “good” side using his thickness sander.

I’ve already glued on the 1/4” maple, so it’s too late to resurrect the bad side. Just chalk it up to experience. As it stands now, the board is a little thicker than 1”.

BTW, your board is beautiful! What’s your secret?

-- Jim in Tennessee

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jasoncarpentry

111 posts in 1256 days


#3 posted 1230 days ago

Hey Karl O-

You may have missed my original post about the board. The replies were very helpful:

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/25074

-- Jim in Tennessee

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kpo101

32 posts in 1230 days


#4 posted 1230 days ago

I do a lot of AutoCad work , When i first designed this board on paper, it had me scratching my head about all the pieces, but after I looked at it close its not that difficult. You just have to use 1-1/8 inch thick stock or you will have a lot of waste using 1x materials. The small pieces each measure 1-1/2” x 1/2”, now there is and additional 2 glue steps to it. About 3 years ago i made a double leaf kitchen island and had this pattern on the top. When completed the top was 24” wide x 7’ long x 2-1/4” thick (48” center stationary section with the 2-18” leafs).

-- When the problem becomes just too much, There is always the directions!! Karl O. of Louisiana

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kpo101

32 posts in 1230 days


#5 posted 1230 days ago

I went and checked out the topic at http://lumberjocks.com/projects/25275 and that sled is exactly like mine with the exception of the Ryobi router I use Porta-cable, just have better luck with them.

-- When the problem becomes just too much, There is always the directions!! Karl O. of Louisiana

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Canadian Woodworks

603 posts in 1671 days


#6 posted 1230 days ago

I think that you should just use mineral oil for this first coat apply it to top end grain surface keep it wet re apply when you get “dry” spots do this for like an hour or more. I would think it would be sucked all the way through to where the bottom maple was added. End grain is like a bunch of straws the mineral oil will be drawn all the way through I’ve had it easily go through 2’’ of end grain and I usually use RAW linseed oil, in comparison it’s thicker than mineral oil.

-- Paul Lemiski, Ontario Canada, Custom Wooden Rocking chairs and tables http://www.canadianwoodworks.com

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