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Forum topic by ChuckV posted 12-31-2017 09:57 PM 669 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ChuckV

3152 posts in 3607 days


12-31-2017 09:57 PM

My son is really getting into building ship models made of plastic and metal. For instance, he is just about finished with a 1/700-scale USS Massachusetts made from thousands of pieces including a brass detail set. He is interested in learning to use an airbrush on his next project. A friend gave him this brush.

We are looking for recommendations for a compressor (and tank?) to use with this type of brush.

Thanks!

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters


17 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1229 posts in 242 days


#1 posted 12-31-2017 10:23 PM

Chuck – I would really like to see your sons model after it is finished.

as for the compressor size, it is not the size that is important, it is the pressure regulator
that can maintain a consistent air flow anywhere from 5 to 35psi to the brush.

many people use those little cigar compressors that are LOUD and never stops until you are done.
so if you have a compressor in your shop already, just find a good regulator for the brush
and run a 50ft air hose to his work station from outside. if you want a dedicated compressor,
they are about $60 on E-Bay. or search C/L for a used one.

I have seen airbrushes run off of old air tanks filled up at the gas station for the air supply.
an airbrush uses very, very little air volume to operate properly.
anything else, please ask.

start looking around on E-Bay, C/L, art stores, etc for spare parts and extra media cups.
6 media cups would be a good starting point for the beginner.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View wuddoc's profile

wuddoc

296 posts in 3797 days


#2 posted 12-31-2017 10:38 PM

Since your son has become interested in model building and finishing he may want to look at the Micro Mark website.

Their air compressor section is here:

https://www.micromark.com/mini-powertool/airbrushes-compressor/compressors

-- Wuddoc

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patcollins

1687 posts in 2945 days


#3 posted 12-31-2017 10:47 PM

The Paasche H is a good brush to start out with, it can’t really make fine lines though, for that you need a dual action internal mix brush such as the Paasche VL.

I paint RC Car bodies, and have found great utility in a 1 Gallon Campbell-Hausfield compressor from Walmart. One of the small compressors from Harbor Freight should good a decent job too. One thing is needed is a moisture trap no matter what compressor he uses.

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MrUnix

6844 posts in 2279 days


#4 posted 12-31-2017 11:49 PM

The airbrush (Paasche H) he was given is a single action type, and might not be the best for fine detail on models.. a dual action brush would be better. Let him try it out, and perhaps get a cheap dual action to let him compare the two. HF has a pretty nice little dual action brush that is essentially a knock off of the Badger Anthem 155 for under $20 (right now they have a 25% off coupon good until Jan 2). I have one and it’s not too bad. Their little compressors are not too bad either, and I know a couple of people who have them and are happy with them. They are more or less knockoffs of ones like the Paasche D500. But basically any compressor will work as long as you can regulate the pressure down enough. I got lucky and found one of these cute little guys on CL a few years back for $10:

It’s a beast of a little compressor with an induction motor and is pretty darn quiet… I’ve used it with all of my brushes from the cheap little HF thing I mentioned above, to my outrageous Paasche AB Turbo (google it!).

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Be cautious of those cheap no-name cups found online like the one John shows… they are not machined all that well and typically will not have the pickup tube all the way to the bottom of the cup. That results in a lot of frustration when just using a little bit of paint, and the friction fit into the brush usually sucks and sometimes they will fall out for no reason. Just saying from experience :)

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View alittleoff's profile

alittleoff

541 posts in 1356 days


#5 posted 01-01-2018 12:39 AM

I don’t know if the harbor frieght pancake compressor is to large for you or not, but I’ve had one for about 2 years and it works great. It or I might say mine came with a regulator, hose and a few fittings. I’ve left it setting for a week or more and it dosent loose any air. But and I’m not kidding it’s LOUD!! But cheap☺
Gerald

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MrUnix

6844 posts in 2279 days


#6 posted 01-01-2018 01:09 AM

I don t know if the harbor frieght pancake compressor is to large for you or not, but I ve had one for about 2 years and it works great. It or I might say mine came with a regulator, hose and a few fittings. I ve left it setting for a week or more and it dosent loose any air. But and I m not kidding it s LOUD!! But cheap☺
Gerald
- alittleoff

That compressor is more geared towards stuff like running a nailer on a job site, and you are correct, it is loud. The HF compressor I mentioned is designed for airbrushes. They actually have two, one is a 1/6hp for around $60, and another one that is 1/5hp and comes with an airbrush, regulator, hoses, etc... (ie: a complete setup) for around $70. That one, as far as I can tell, is pretty much identical to the Paasche D500 except for the color. Amazon has the bare Paasche compressor for sale (no regulator, hose or anything else) for a bit more than $80.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3152 posts in 3607 days


#7 posted 01-01-2018 01:22 AM

Thanks for all the ideas.

We have this compressor. Should this work with the addition of a regulator?

The very sparse documentation says that it “delivers 0.5 CFM of compressed air at 10 psi for spraying and delivers up to 40 psi for inflating tires, etc.”

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View MrUnix's profile (online now)

MrUnix

6844 posts in 2279 days


#8 posted 01-01-2018 01:44 AM

That one should work fine… you will need about 25-35psi at the airbrush depending on what needle/tip you use. Not sure of the CFM, but since that claims it is for airbrushes, I would think it should work as advertised. (btw: the HF one claims 0.7cfm @40 psi, just in case the one you have doesn’t cut it)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Carloz's profile

Carloz

1147 posts in 671 days


#9 posted 01-01-2018 02:18 AM

1. Oil compressors are excluded.
2. Water trap filter is a must.

View patcollins's profile

patcollins

1687 posts in 2945 days


#10 posted 01-01-2018 02:35 AM



That one should work fine… you will need about 25-35psi at the airbrush depending on what needle/tip you use. Not sure of the CFM, but since that claims it is for airbrushes, I would think it should work as advertised. (btw: the HF one claims 0.7cfm @40 psi, just in case the one you have doesn t cut it)

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Depends, I find siphon feed requires a lot more pressure than gravity feed. The viscosity of the paint you use has a lot to do with it too.

View mel52's profile

mel52

482 posts in 344 days


#11 posted 01-01-2018 02:51 AM

I was a professional taxidermist for around 20 years until I realized that I was burning myself out and didn’t get to hunt or fish myself because of being busy. During that time, during many conventions, there were many seminars on different airbrushes and their use. Everything above said about the H and VL Paasche series is true. When going to finer lines with less pressure and thinner paint you will have to change needle sizes, simply done. They both work well with solvent and water based paints. Hydro Mist is an excellent water based paint that is excellent with so many different colors it’s mind boggling, it also dries just about instantly when sprayed on a project, so no wait time between coats or colors. Cleans up with water but when dried it takes acetone or its own thinner to clean. You might look up the Aztek line of air brushes. They are the simplest to switch around and by far the easiest to clean. Tips just change out for different patterns and paint types. No internal cleaning of the airbrush itself, just the tips. I still have an H and two VL series along with the Aztek set-up.

-- MEL, Kansas

View ChuckV's profile

ChuckV

3152 posts in 3607 days


#12 posted 01-08-2018 02:22 AM


Chuck – I would really like to see your sons model after it is finished.

- John Smith

John,

Here are a few photos of the USS Massachusetts in 1/700 scale. He did an amazing job adding many touches such as weathering and rigging. Last year, we visited the real thing in Fall River!

-- “Big man, pig man, ha ha, charade you are.” ― R. Waters

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1229 posts in 242 days


#13 posted 01-08-2018 02:39 AM

holy kow – WOW !!!!!!

very very impressive !! my hat is off to your son.

now, build a nice display case for it and you will have a treasure
that will portray history for a few more generations.

well done young man, well done indeed

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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corelz125

471 posts in 1056 days


#14 posted 01-08-2018 03:00 AM

Very impressive job on that boat

View JonU's profile

JonU

7 posts in 216 days


#15 posted 01-10-2018 07:12 PM

Nice detail on the boat.

showing 1 through 15 of 17 replies

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