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Rockwell 46-525 Lathe -- Need Help Assembling

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Forum topic by scottbennet posted 12-31-2017 04:02 PM 1401 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scottbennet

4 posts in 172 days


12-31-2017 04:02 PM

Topic tags/keywords: lathe 46-525

I have acquired an old Rockwell 46-525 lathe. It’s in pieces (and may be missing a few). See the attached photos. I’ve downloaded the parts diagram but it’s not much help (kinda small for my eyes). I’m wondering if someone in the forum has one and would be able to help me put humpty-dumpty back together. Mostly looking for photos of how things go back together. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.


7 replies so far

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dhazelton

2771 posts in 2322 days


#1 posted 12-31-2017 04:35 PM

I don’t know what’s going on in that electrical box – is that a three phase motor?

Instructions for how to get the reeves drive set up should be here.

http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs/detail.aspx?id=6957

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scottbennet

4 posts in 172 days


#2 posted 12-31-2017 05:00 PM

Thanks for the parts diagram link. Helpful. But some photos of someone else’s lathe would be helpful. I haven’t see anything anywhere on the electrical on my lathe. Nameplate on motor says 3/4 hp, single phase. Appears to be original motor (has Rockwell nameplate).

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scottbennet

4 posts in 172 days


#3 posted 12-31-2017 06:13 PM

I think the electrical box is a low voltage magnetic motor control. I have a similar box on the side of my shaper and that’s what the manual says (it has it’s own model number – 52-704). There is model number on the box on my lathe.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

6766 posts in 2225 days


#4 posted 12-31-2017 07:28 PM

It’s a single phase machine… only one heater in the starter – so no problems there. It also has a multi-tap control transformer, so you can run a wide range of voltages (as dictated by whatever motor you have). If you take a stroll over to the OWWM site, there is lots of information about that lathe and how to go about working on various aspects of it. Here is one such thread that has some pretty good pictures of an assembled one: Lathe Newbie Brings Home 1976 Rockwell 46-525 lathe and there are quite a few others over there as well. The parts diagram is your friend though, as they pretty much show exactly how everything fits together. It’s a PDF, so you can zoom in pretty big.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Even if it had three heaters in the starter, that doesn’t mean it’s a three phase machine… just that it has a starter that can control either a single or three phase machine. But if it only has one heater, then it’s single phase only.

PSS: If you have a serial number, you can date the machine and find the catalog entry to see what different configurations/options were offered.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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scottbennet

4 posts in 172 days


#5 posted 01-01-2018 06:35 PM

Brad – Thanks for the info. I did look at the post and it has some good photos that should help me. Question on my electrics since you know much more than I do. Where does the power cord connect ? I’m assuming if I run 220 into the box one 110 leg goes to L1, the other 110 leg goes to L2, and the neutral to T2. Thoughts ?

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MrUnix

6766 posts in 2225 days


#6 posted 01-01-2018 06:51 PM

There is no neutral with 240v… hots go to L1 and L2 and ground goes to the ground block to the left of them. Motor will hook to T1 and T2. Since it’s a single phase machine, T1 will be the wire coming off the overload heater. It looks like it’s currently setup for 120v, in which case T1 would be the hot, T2 would be the neutral (ground is always ground). Make sure the starter and motor are wired for the same voltage (120 or 240). If you want to run 240v, then verify the motor is wired for it, and move the wire on the control transformer from H5 (115v) to H3 (230v) like on this one:

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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MrUnix

6766 posts in 2225 days


#7 posted 01-01-2018 08:16 PM

It looks like it s currently setup for 120v, in which case T1 would be the hot, T2 would be the neutral (ground is always ground).

I meant to say that for 120v, L1 would be the hot coming in, and L2 would be the neutral, in case that wasn’t clear. Basically L1,L2 and L3 are the supply voltage input, and T1, T2 and T3 are the load (motor) output… so L1 → T1, L2 → T2 and L3 → T3. (L3/T3 will be found on starters capable of handling three phase).

One other point… if the machine was setup for 120v and you are switching to 240v, then you will need to replace the overload heaters to match [1].

Cheers,
Brad

[1] Technically, since going from 120 to 240v will reduce the current draw, you don’t absolutely have to replace the heaters – but you will lose overload protection if you don’t.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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