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Can you guys give me some tips for my workshop?

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Forum topic by JohnAjluni posted 03-15-2011 11:11 PM 1931 views 0 times favorited 24 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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JohnAjluni

102 posts in 1331 days


03-15-2011 11:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw carving tool drill-driver lathe planer scroll saw biscuit joiner chisel drill press miter saw router spray gun blade clamp jointer plane sander tablesaw

I need some tips to improve my workshop space and some power tool ideas.

-- John


24 replies so far

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1619 days


#1 posted 03-15-2011 11:18 PM

How big is your shop and what kind of tools do you already have?

-- Life is good.

View JohnAjluni's profile

JohnAjluni

102 posts in 1331 days


#2 posted 03-15-2011 11:31 PM

well lets see i dont know the exact dimensions of my workshop but its fairly small and all i have are hand tools and some hand power tools like a belt sander and a drill small stuff like that.

-- John

View Sailor's profile

Sailor

533 posts in 1961 days


#3 posted 03-15-2011 11:38 PM

John, post your workshop tour video from Youtube in this thread so that people can see what you are dealing with and they will be able to give you advice much easier.

-- Dothan, Alabama Check out my woodworking blog! http://woodworkingtrip.blogspot.com/ Also my Youtube Channel's Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SailingAndSuch

View JohnAjluni's profile

JohnAjluni

102 posts in 1331 days


#4 posted 03-15-2011 11:42 PM

There you guys go!!!:)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWrjscSOizU

-- John

View wseand's profile

wseand

2449 posts in 1738 days


#5 posted 03-15-2011 11:55 PM

Welcome John Do you have a workbench. You can build one on the real cheep and put shelves in it for more storage. Peg board is great for hanging tools. As far as power tools you just need to keep an eye on CL and wait for tools you can afford. Not sure how your finances are but there are some cheep power tools at the big box stores and Harbor Freight.

-- Bill - "Freedom flies in your heart like an Eagle" Audie Murphy

View lew's profile

lew

10100 posts in 2451 days


#6 posted 03-16-2011 12:44 AM

I would start with a more substantial work bench and a method of getting the most used hand tools out of the drawers and into more easily accessible areas. A general rearrangement/consolidation of boxes and containers will free up more space. If that computer equipment is going to be reused, you need to get it into an area where they won’t get contaminated by dust.

Looks like you have a good start on basic hand tools and hand power tools. My first choices on stationary power tools would be a table saw, jointer and surface planer. Your budget will dictate what to buy. Just remember, buy the best you can afford.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View JohnAjluni's profile

JohnAjluni

102 posts in 1331 days


#7 posted 03-16-2011 02:33 AM

Wow!!!thanks guys great opinions!!! I actuly ended up moving my computer parts into some containers and put them away for some safe keeping. I plan to reuse them.

Another question i have is do you think there is anything that i own i could sell like tools hand tools and even the computer parts!

and thanks a lot wseand i will check out harbor freight and big box stores ad i have always been checking craigslist:)

-- John

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1351 days


#8 posted 03-16-2011 03:12 AM

Is there another room for the boxes? Shelves made out of 2×4s and plywood make a big difference in opening up floorspace. A lot of guys like pegboard for on the wall tool storage but I like to mount 3/4 inch plywood to the studs. Any time you need to store another tool all you need is a finish nail, of course you can get more elaborate if you want. (take a look at my shop)

It all depends on the kind of work you want to do. You are not going to build any boats in that shop, but some nice cabinets or boxes can be done.

You do not need the power tools, or even a monster bench to do good work (look at how traditional Japanese do it) but good tools are a must. You don’t have the space or the money for bad tools. Here is what I would start with that I did not see: a good combination square, (Starrett, good work starts with accurate layout) an adjustable mouth block plane (tune up an old one or buy from Lie Nielsen or Lee Valley, don’t go to the big box store), and a good all purpose saw (ryoba type, or a good bowsaw filed rip). After that get a decent set of chisels, (again don’t go to a big box store, those are worthless unless you are willing to spend a day flattening backs…..of course if you are Irwin blue chips are not a bad investment).

Of course a good bench is a beautiful thing. Build your first one out of southern yellow pine it’s cheap tough and available everywhere. Make it heavy as hell and have the legs flush with the top (trust me). And this next point is pure opinion…avoid a tool well.

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

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JohnAjluni

102 posts in 1331 days


#9 posted 03-16-2011 04:51 AM

thanks RGtools!!!!

-- John

View lmac8542's profile

lmac8542

2 posts in 1325 days


#10 posted 03-16-2011 05:18 AM

I live in San Diego which is good because my garage is filled with hot rods so I have my shop out in the open and a storage shed to put all my tools back in at night. The reason I am telling you this is that I found an expandable workbench in the January 2011 issues of Shop Notes that is great for small shops.
Check it out.

Remember, All gave some and some gave all. Remember your Vet.

View dannymac's profile

dannymac

144 posts in 1712 days


#11 posted 03-16-2011 05:34 AM

john listen if your just starting out don’t waste your money on high end tools. start with the cheap ones and learn everything you can do with them, then more to something a little better. you shouldn’t be buying topnotch tools for a few years yet. your gonna make mistakes in the begining and it’s better to lose a $10 chisel than a $100 one. be patient

-- dannymac

View Sawkerf's profile

Sawkerf

1730 posts in 1765 days


#12 posted 03-16-2011 05:59 AM

I’m in the process of reorganizing my garage shop and am trying to make maximum use of something that I only sorta took advantage of before. The “something” is the vertical dimension. For example, my planer sits close to the bandsaw but is positioned so that I can run boards past the base of the BS, or run boards thru the BS and over the planer.

I’ve moved the drill press near the shaper and can run pieces thru the shaper under the DP table or use the DP above the shaper.

It’s working pretty well, so far.

-- Adversity doesn't build character...................it reveals it.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

3480 posts in 1890 days


#13 posted 03-16-2011 06:21 AM

John,
One piece of advice I can give you is to take some shop tours on here. Look at how they are laid out, get some ideas from them, take notes, etc…..Plus, the shop tours are very interesting, and there are some really great ones on here…..At least you’ll get ideas for layout designs, tool placements, cabinet storage, etc. It’s a good place to start…..

-- " I started with nothing, and I've still got most of it left".......

View RGtools's profile

RGtools

3302 posts in 1351 days


#14 posted 03-16-2011 03:06 PM

john listen if your just starting out don’t waste your money on high end tools. start with the cheap ones and learn everything you can do with them, then more to something a little better. you shouldn’t be buying topnotch tools for a few years yet. your gonna make mistakes in the begining and it’s better to lose a $10 chisel than a $100 one. be patient

Here are a few reasons I disagree with this:
Good tools are easier to maintain. You can’t ever blame them for poor work (which means you admit YOU messed up and you fix it). And you only by them once which means they are cheaper. You can go cheap and restore your hand tools but this takes knowhow, supplies and a lot of elbow grease. I’ve done this, but one area you simply can’t cut corners on is your marking and measuring gear BUY THE BEST THERE IS, it’s what you need.

If you are worried about damaging a good tool as a novice, here are a few tips. Avoid power grinders, even low speed ones with good cool cutting wheels have a tendancy to burn. Use plate glass (or a slab of granite) and adhesive backed sandpaper and a jig to sharpen, it’s easy (lie nielsen has free plans for an angle setting jig) and you won’t risk burning steel. Prevent rust, wipe your good tools down at the end of the day with a good oil (jojoba, camellia wd40…whatever) this is especially important for good saws because of the type of steel.

Afterthought: a small shop like yours stick to hand tools it will scale up the size of work you can do (that’s just my opinion)

-- Make furniture that lasts as long as the tree - Ryan

View ElmwoodIntarsia's profile

ElmwoodIntarsia

40 posts in 1339 days


#15 posted 03-16-2011 05:20 PM

About seven years ago I moved from Philadelphia to Marlton, NJ. I finally had a garage I could convert into a shop for my growing woodworking ‘Hobby’. The garage measures 15’ by 23’. I tore out everything and started with a open space. Aside from my Table saw, I had four Benchtop tools that took up so much space, I had no real room on my workbench. Since I had to sacrafice about 12’ from one side of the garage for ‘seasonal’ storage. I needed to come up with a way to make the best use of what space I had. I found a great space-saving idea in an issue of “Shop Notes”. A sort of “Lazy-Susan” for power tools. It sits in the corner of my shop. and has a rotating tabletop and a lazy-susan under that. Mounted on top I have four bench top power tools. A Drill Press, a Scrollsaw, a Band Saw, and Belt/Disc Sander. Each of these ‘stations’ has a 6” deep drawer directly below the tool, where I store bits, blades, sand paper and such for each tool. I monted a power strip onto the side of the Band Saw and plug everything into that. When I want to use any one of these tools, I simply release the latch that locks the top in position and rotate the top till the tool lines up in the corner where I am standing. I latch it in place and plug in the main cord and I am set. I have since upgraded to a bigger Scrollsaw, but have the otherone as a backup.

SHOP NOTES Issue 35 – Revolving Tool Station.

http://www.scribd.com/doc/6587133/ShopNotes-35

-- Jack Labor - Elmwood Intarsia - Artistry In Wood

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