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Best wood for "grave" market

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Forum topic by dpw21562 posted 12-29-2017 02:17 PM 670 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dpw21562

2 posts in 170 days


12-29-2017 02:17 PM

I had a dear friend pass away and want to make a market for her grave. I want to soak the wood in “something” to extend the life of the wood. Any ideas as what to use and what wood would be best. Had some great stuff when I jested poles for the power company but can’ t get and ( gov. Rags ).


15 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 184 days


#1 posted 12-29-2017 02:40 PM

I am assuming that you mean “marker” for your friends grave ?
when my father passed away 35 years ago, I made a nice marker
out of cypress and treated it with waterproofer and installed it myself
until we could afford a stone marker.
the cemetery manager called me the next day to come get it as there is
a rule of NO WOOD allowed as markers or surrounds in their cemetery. temporary or permanent.
so you may want to check with the cemetery management prior to making anything.

I do remember making a marker for one of my employees out of 3” thick redwood about 15 years ago.
it was like 12×18”, not big. I affixed two 1” stainless pipe legs into the bottom 3 feet long to anchor it
and keep the wood above ground. it was really nice….... the lady installed it and the next day it was gone.
she looked around and found it in a nearby dumpster. we guess the grounds keeper put it there. she brought
it back to the shop (in a very sad mood) and we removed the legs and she took it home as keepsake
of her grandmother. so check the rules prior to spending a lot of time on something you can not use.

if you have a nice carving ability, you could ask the cemetery manager if you could make a marker
out of cast bronze for her grave.
make the pattern out of whatever material you use for carving and send it to a foundry and they will
make a cast bronze reproduction…... if they allow that, there are certain aspects of the marker that
must be adhered to. such as a threaded “nub” on the back so a bronze rod could be fitted to the back
then about two feet down, a coffee can of cement is poured into it then the brass rod anchors the marker
in place so it won’t move. that would be your second option.
only the cemetery manager can discuss your options with you.
good luck !! at least your heart is in the right place.
and my condolences to you in the passing of your friend.

google samples of markers – much cheaper than a big hunk of granite.
if you wanted to purchase a commercially made one yourself.
https://www.google.com/search?q=bronze+grave+marker+images&rlz=1C1BLWB_enUS651US651&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=vAqs5JX67vNq5M%253A%252Ch6Spfb6TVQXETM%252C_&usg=__w_XwsfexIkw1sJZyVKlFGJH-Uyk%3D&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiXl9LJwq_YAhUDbSYKHfakCyIQ9QEISDAA#imgrc=vAqs5JX67vNq5M:

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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Knockonit

376 posts in 224 days


#2 posted 12-29-2017 02:49 PM

One thing you could use is a composite wood, if allowed, whilst not the purdiest, will allow markage till a final resolution can be found.
good luck,
rj

Moisture shield makes a solid composite, that one can carve, or attache information too, most of the other composites are a skinned product and are imo not condussive to long term exposure to soil conditions

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JBrow

1358 posts in 942 days


#3 posted 12-29-2017 02:58 PM

dpw21562,

My condolences; I am sorry for your loss.

I was unaware of the grave marker restriction mentioned by John Smith, but now that I think about, stone is the only type of maker I recall seeing in cemeteries. Perhaps this is a common restriction and well worth checking.

As far as I know, any wood exposed to the elements will gray unless a protective top coat is regularly applied. Resistance to rot depends not only of the wood but also design. If the design is such that there is no ground contact, the horizontal surfaces are beveled to shed water, and end grain exposed only on the vertical plane, any wood should last longer.

Here is a survey of woods that hold up well in the elements…

https://www.woodmagazine.com/materials-guide/lumber/outdoor-lumber

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 184 days


#4 posted 12-29-2017 03:52 PM

I forgot – depending on the rules of your cemetery, a cast concrete marker may be allowed.
again – some craftsmanship is required to make the form, place the graphics, mix and pour
the concrete to make the final grave marker.
this may be your “option B” if the cemetery even allows homemade markers of any kind.
there are a few videos on YouTube on how to make your own DIY concrete grave marker.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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dpw21562

2 posts in 170 days


#5 posted 12-29-2017 07:47 PM

How would teak work ?

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rustfever

752 posts in 3332 days


#6 posted 12-29-2017 08:26 PM

Black Locust is probably one of the most durable woods. Many acknowledgement of the wood holding up over 100 years.

-- Rustfever, Central California

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 184 days


#7 posted 12-29-2017 08:35 PM

you guys are missing the point here.

in the cemeteries that I have seen, and had personal experience with, just as JBrow mentioned,
there is no wood allowed in cemeteries – at all – temporary or permanent.

the original poster, dpw21562, MUST consult with his cemetery manager for the correct answer.
we can suggest all kinds of wood species and products for a grave marker.
but the end result lies within the cemetery rules as to the placement of a homemade marker on a grave.

rules like this are there for a reason….. if a cemetery allowed wood markers, cemeteries all over the country
would have homemade wooden markers that looked like Boot Hill – - – and they don’t want that.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

376 posts in 224 days


#8 posted 12-29-2017 08:37 PM

Yep, got that John, but still doesn’t negate the request for what type of wood COULD be used if allowed. as with all things in life there are sometimes rules, and its up to each individual to anticipate or figure them our for themselves. just because we recommended something doesn’t mean its legal, viable or usable.
Rj in az.


you guys are missing the point here.

in the cemeteries that I have seen, and had personal experience with, just as JBrow mentioned,
there is no wood allowed in cemeteries – at all – temporary or permanent.

the original poster, dpw21562, MUST consult with his cemetery manager for the correct answer.
we can suggest all kinds of wood species and products for a grave marker.
but the end result lies within the cemetery rules as to the placement of a homemade marker on a grave.

.

- John Smith


View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 184 days


#9 posted 12-29-2017 08:46 PM

if there were no restrictions – i would suggest teak or redwood about 3” thick left unfinished in the natural state.
WITH stainless steel pipe inserted in each end from the bottom for legs,
securely fastened deep into the wood and 3 feet long.
then when installed, dig holes the size of post hole diggers 3 feet deep, fill with cement, and insert the pipe
to where the wood is just a little above ground. also – make the panel out of one solid piece – no laminations.

that would be my answer.

it would take only five minutes for the original poster to look up the phone number to the cemetery
and give them a call. or send me the name of the cemetery and I will do the research for him.
I have been an active member of https://www.findagrave.com/ for several years. caring for and documenting
old cemeteries around the country.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 184 days


#10 posted 12-30-2017 06:03 PM

on behalf of the OP, I reached out to the church that manages the cemetery
in question and they have a very firm policy of no organic or homemade markers
can be placed within the boundaries of the cemetery property. so any marker
that is not commercially made out of natural stone or cast bronze will be promptly removed
and discarded by the cemetery maintenance staff.
so – wood and homemade markers are out.
and the person I spoke with said this is the norm for modern cemeteries
that are governed by the Cemetery Administration.

[the OP provided me with the cemetery name and location]

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

View clin's profile

clin

849 posts in 1018 days


#11 posted 12-30-2017 07:53 PM



you guys are missing the point here.

in the cemeteries that I have seen, and had personal experience with, just as JBrow mentioned,
there is no wood allowed in cemeteries – at all – temporary or permanent.

the original poster, dpw21562, MUST consult with his cemetery manager for the correct answer.
we can suggest all kinds of wood species and products for a grave marker.
but the end result lies within the cemetery rules as to the placement of a homemade marker on a grave.

rules like this are there for a reason….. if a cemetery allowed wood markers, cemeteries all over the country
would have homemade wooden markers that looked like Boot Hill – - – and they don t want that.

.

- John Smith

John,

It’s great that you made sure the OP and everyone else understood it isn’t allowed, but no need to tell everyone else to stop contributing their opinions. We’re all just trying to have a friendly discussion here.

While the point is moot concerning a grave marker, there’s still value in getting some opinions. It won’t help the OP, but the information can still be useful to others looking to place other signs an such outdoors. The original question and point of the thread was what wood would hold up best in this type application.

And sometimes it’s just fun to kick things around, even if it leads nowhere.

My opinion, Spanish cedar holds up well outdoors with no treatment.

-- Clin

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

989 posts in 184 days


#12 posted 12-30-2017 08:11 PM

I guess I was more concerned with working with a grieving person
and trying to assist him with accurate information than to carry on in his
post with this that and the other that did not pertain to his issue at hand.
I have spoken with the OP and given him my findings. the family will decide
on their options from here.

if we want to discuss outdoor wood markers, we should
start another thread that does not include raw emotions being involved
of the original poster and let this one slide into the background.
I will be glad to start the thread – then we can all add our opinions and experiences there.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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JackDuren

388 posts in 981 days


#13 posted 12-30-2017 08:15 PM

View jbay's profile

jbay

2331 posts in 921 days


#14 posted 12-30-2017 08:40 PM

I was going to say Ipe as well.

I don’t think I would use Apitong, but it’s good for trailer beds so it must be a good outdoor material, I just don’t hear of anybody using it for anything else. Too ugly?

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

117114 posts in 3599 days


#15 posted 12-30-2017 09:09 PM

Sorry for your loss.
Ditto on Ipe It is a very durable outdoor wood and is fire rated an “A” the same as masonry products this may get you by any cemetery regulations if you present that to the manager.

-- https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos wood crafting & woodworking classes

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