LumberJocks

Bet bit for use in a "router-planer" ?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by wildbill001 posted 03-14-2011 09:25 PM 9633 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View wildbill001's profile

wildbill001

111 posts in 2108 days


03-14-2011 09:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

My apologies if this has been covered before but my “search-fu” is weak….

Going to be needing to plane some boards down and don’t have a planer. BUT I do have a router (therefore I can do anything as someone wrote a while back).

What’s the best bit for this? a dado bottom-cleaning bit, a bowl bit, plunge bit, or ????

Bill W

-- "You can tell the pioneers by the arrows in their back" -- Unknown


13 replies so far

View Viktor's profile

Viktor

456 posts in 2885 days


#1 posted 03-14-2011 10:07 PM

I think a bowl bit would be the best.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2540 days


#2 posted 03-14-2011 10:20 PM

I’m not clear as to what you want to do with the router. If you need to get a good clean edge on your board for a good glue up, you need a straight bit and a router table and a fence that can be adjusted such that one side is slightly closer than the other side.

If you want to use a router to make the side of a board flat, you need one of the bits you suggest, a good gig and a LOT of patience.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#3 posted 03-14-2011 10:30 PM

Don’t do it. It’s an enormous hassle.

I’ve done it. Not worth the trouble in normal woods. There
may be special situations, as in flattening end grain, where
a router surfacing jig makes sense.

Magnate makes surfacing cutters too. Probably their main
market is people using the Legacy mills.

http://www.amazon.com/Magnate-Surface-Planning-Bottom-Cleaning/dp/B0006B0QXE

Spend the dough on a hand plane and some stones or
get a handheld planer and use that. Even if you have a Legacy
mill, surfacing with a router is still tedious and the surface
needs a lot of sanding or planing afterwards anyway.

View Bertha's profile

Bertha

13003 posts in 2159 days


#4 posted 03-14-2011 10:35 PM

I’ve never seen this attempted outside of someone needed to reach down inside a piece to flatten the floor. It sounds like it would require a lot of jig making & risk. Maybe you could get a local shop to plane it for you?

-- My dad and I built a 65 chev pick up.I killed trannys in that thing for some reason-Hog

View BreakingBoardom's profile

BreakingBoardom

615 posts in 2547 days


#5 posted 03-14-2011 10:38 PM

If you don’t need the large 2” bit Loren suggested, they make other sizes as well. But yeah, the surface planing bottom cleaning bits will probably be your best bet. Here’s a link to other sizes.

Magnate Surface Planing Bits

-- Matt - http://breakingboardom.wordpress.com/

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3231 days


#6 posted 03-14-2011 10:42 PM

Try this. Take your time and read the entire post. I don’t think it would take very long at all.
- JJ

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/1992

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3231 days


#7 posted 03-14-2011 10:43 PM

......... and here’s the bit Gary recommended.
- JJ

http://www.magnate.net/index.cfm?event=showProductGroup&theID=136

View wildbill001's profile

wildbill001

111 posts in 2108 days


#8 posted 03-15-2011 12:00 AM

The link that juniorjock posted above is what I’m going to be doing but on a much smaller scale. Maybe 3-4” wide x 12-18” long. I’m gonna resaw the board close to the thickness I want, and then clean up the saw marks with a rig like this.

So, looks like a bottom-bit is what I’ll order and use.

Thanks!

Bill

-- "You can tell the pioneers by the arrows in their back" -- Unknown

View therookie's profile

therookie

887 posts in 2293 days


#9 posted 03-15-2011 12:03 AM

I agree with the first response.

-- http://aewoodworks.webs.com

View Loren's profile (online now)

Loren

8313 posts in 3114 days


#10 posted 03-15-2011 12:20 AM

I forgot about this:

The Wagner Safe-T-Planer. It’s a thing you chuck in a drill press
or onto the accessory shaft of some radial arm saws. It’s supposed
to make a pretty nice cut.

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 3231 days


#11 posted 03-15-2011 01:14 AM

Yes Bill, I think I would only try to use Gary’s jig for something that is kinda small (I may work my way up to some larger boards, but I’d start off small).

Loren, you’re right, I’ve seen those bits and wondered how they did. Would be nice to hear from anyone that has tried them.

Going back to Gary’s jig, I think you could surface plane one entire side with a router and flip it over on a flat table and rout the other…. but it would work best for getting the sides right and then flipping it and running it through the planer with the supports on the sides. But, this wouldn’t do Bill much good since he doesn’t have a planer.

Gary was nice enough to answer the questions I had about this sled and I’m sure he would help you out too if you asked.

- JJ

View Viktor's profile

Viktor

456 posts in 2885 days


#12 posted 03-15-2011 02:17 AM

The reason I mentioned bowl bit is because it will make seamless transition between passes, yet has flat bottom that is wide enough for efficient work.
The biggest problem with router surfacing is the mess, not productivity. Once you have a good setup (like in Gary’s link) you’ll in most cases beat hand plane and winding sticks when flattening a slab. Seems like Gary does not use any dust collection. I would not do it in the shop, unless I want to spend a day cleaning. Dust shrouds that enclose cutting bit and connect to shop vacuum are available for some routers. Or one can be shop made. You also need to keep router base as close to the slab as possible for the vacuum to suck up dust effectively.

View SASmith               's profile

SASmith

1850 posts in 2453 days


#13 posted 03-16-2011 01:01 AM

I used a bit like breakingboardom linked to. I think mine was from MLCS.
Here is a link to a big glue lamination I “planed” with a router:
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/40093
I probably spent 20 minutes on that table top(78”x30”) with the router.Then I sanded out the router marks.
Scott

-- Scott Smith, Southern Illinois

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com