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Forum topic by DavidOveracre posted 12-27-2017 08:42 PM 694 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DavidOveracre

45 posts in 1173 days


12-27-2017 08:42 PM

These are cope and stick, poplar door frames with “1/4” ply panels. The nature of my Freud router bits leaves wiggle room front to back for the panels. Of course they aren’t glued, but are pinned in 4-6 places to keep from rattling. I’ve primed two coats so far.

Question:
Would I be safe to sparingly caulk the gaps between the panels and frame before final color? Am I safe against the caulk cracking eventually? Will I get any flashing /should I prime over caulk again?

PS
These will be glazed over the final color for a more rustic look, in the onset I figured the gaps wouldn’t be detrimental to the final look because if this…

-- Dave O.


10 replies so far

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cabmaker

1740 posts in 3008 days


#1 posted 12-27-2017 09:15 PM

your best bet would be to size your material for your cutting tools…...but …...yes you can caulk before the final coat

will the caulk crack ? Doubtful but may contract or expand to let you know they were caulked

That part is anyones guess,,,,,,too many unknowns for anyone to give you an absolute prediction….( but if it helps….it is done everyday with good results)

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jbay

2864 posts in 1098 days


#2 posted 12-27-2017 09:24 PM

I do it all the time with shaker style doors. Never had a problem.
Looks 10 times better than having the seam/gaps show.
Here is a set in my shop right now:

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DavidOveracre

45 posts in 1173 days


#3 posted 12-28-2017 12:01 AM

Any particular caulk you use jbay?

-- Dave O.

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jbay

2864 posts in 1098 days


#4 posted 12-28-2017 02:34 AM



Any particular caulk you use jbay?

- DavidOveracre

Nope any of the Dap caulk will work.
I use the more expensive one but it’s not needed.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/DAP-DYNAFLEX-230-10-1-oz-White-Paintable-Latex-Caulk/1000191841

The trick is to cut a small of hole in the tip as possible.
I use a wet rag and wipe the surface first then just use a small bead so you don’t have to smear it around.
Use your finger to press it in and smooth it/remove the excess. Just do one side at a time.

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John Smith

1481 posts in 362 days


#5 posted 12-28-2017 04:06 AM

I would avoid any “siliconized” caulk to avoid paint adhesion issues in the future.

oh yeah – awesome job on the doors !!!

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

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cabmaker

1740 posts in 3008 days


#6 posted 12-28-2017 01:23 PM



I would avoid any “siliconized” caulk to avoid paint adhesion issues in the future.

oh yeah – awesome job on the doors !!!

Actually…..siliconized is what you want…...not the same thing as straight up silicone

.

- John Smith

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John Smith

1481 posts in 362 days


#7 posted 12-28-2017 02:48 PM

sorry for the confusion: yes, Cab, what I meant was to avoid the pure silicone caulk
like tub and tile sealants, that is hard to paint. not good for wood joints.
as for my first reply post above with the photo – it is for the “with silicone” caulk.
I have used the DAP Acrylic Latex Caulk “plus” Silicone for many years.
back when it was just a “plain” caulk. then 20 year caulk, then 25, then 30,
then 35 year and now it is purported to be a “40 year caulk”. my #1 choice
for blending/filling of casework seams, window trim, and especially on baseboards to
to seal the gap between the wall and the top of the baseboard.

thanks for the clarification.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

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DavidOveracre

45 posts in 1173 days


#8 posted 12-28-2017 04:01 PM

My only concern is shrinkage. The wood was all from a reputable dealer, where I always get it. And the panels are ply not solid, so I can’t imagine the seams opening much at all. However, the water based paint introduces quite a bit of… well, water to the wood. So theoretically the doors expand after painting for a good while. If I spray, it gets into the gaps relatively well and I would imagine that in the cabs final resting place, after they’ve had a chance to shrink back, I wouldn’t notice any gaps due to atomized paint makes no it’s way in. BUT if the gaps are caulked and the doors shrink back, I’d imagine if any cracking happened it’d show. ANOTHER BUT, I can’t imagine the movement being significant enough to crack the caulk, it should flex… I’m overthinking it huh?

-- Dave O.

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jbay

2864 posts in 1098 days


#9 posted 12-28-2017 04:08 PM

I think you are over thinking a bit.
You shouldn’t have that much movement. Get the Dap ALEX FLEX if you are worried.

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DavidOveracre

45 posts in 1173 days


#10 posted 01-13-2018 03:34 PM

Here’s the results:
Sanded 220
Primed
Sanded 220
Primed
Sanded 220
Caulked (Alex flex)
Two coats of SW Emerald urethane mod. enamel
Glazed

-- Dave O.

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