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Wiring a motor for 220V...how do I connect the leads?

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Forum topic by black_dog posted 03-14-2011 02:11 AM 7880 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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black_dog

3 posts in 3171 days


03-14-2011 02:11 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question jointer motor 220v configuration

Here is the situation: I have an older (1950’s-era) Craftsman benchtop jointer, which i inherited from my grandfather. The motor, which I believe is after-market, does not have a cord anymore. It is literally just four wires; one coming out of each winding.

I’d like to wire this motor for 220V. There is no wiring schematic anywhere on/inside the motor. There is also no model number stamped on the faceplate, as you can see:

This has made it virtually impossible to obtain any information on the particulars of this motor. I’m afraid that if I hook the leads up wrong I could burn up the motor. I plan to tap a hole in the motor housing for a ground screw as well. Below are pictures of the stator, the starter/bearing and the rotor.

Stator:

Starter/bearing – I flipped the end plate over when I took it off; in case the orientation of those magnet things makes any difference in the wiring:

Rotor – the left end of the rotor in the photo engages with the end plate of the above image:

I’m no electrician, although I am competent enough to have wired my own shop for 220V, so I feel like this is something I can do if I have the correct information. If there is anyone out there who can offer me any advice, I would be very appreciative!

Thanks,

—Adam


8 replies so far

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Stormin

193 posts in 2257 days


#1 posted 03-14-2011 03:21 AM

Is there numbers or colors on the leads? Can you post a picture of the junction box ?

Norm

-- I started off with nothing I have most of it left

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black_dog

3 posts in 3171 days


#2 posted 03-14-2011 04:56 AM

Unfortunately, the leads are all spray-painted red. Below is a pic of the junction box, if that helps:

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Stormin

193 posts in 2257 days


#3 posted 03-14-2011 05:54 AM

Bare the ends of the wires and separate them attach 110 volt wire to one lead and take a light socket with the 2 wires connect 1 wire to the neutral and then touch the remaining wire to each lead on the motor until it lights up, this will identify your windings mark the ends 1 2 for one winding 3 4 for the other set Once you are sure you have the windings identified hook them up to 110 volt connect 1 and 3 to one wire and 2 and 4 to the other. If that works then connect the 220 volt power wire to lead 1 and and the other power wire to lead 4 twist 2 and 3 together Give it a try you have nothing to lose

-- I started off with nothing I have most of it left

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#4 posted 03-14-2011 05:56 AM

Do you have a meter to check contunity and know how to do it? If so, find out if the leads are in 2 pairs with contunity. Might take a couple of tries to get them properly seriesed, but that would be my guess as to how to wire it.

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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TopamaxSurvivor

17677 posts in 3143 days


#5 posted 03-14-2011 05:58 AM

Wish I had known you were posting while I was typing Norm :-))

-- Bob in WW ~ "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

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Stormin

193 posts in 2257 days


#6 posted 03-14-2011 06:00 AM

Sorry Black Dog you can also use an Ohm meter if you have access to one

-- I started off with nothing I have most of it left

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Stormin

193 posts in 2257 days


#7 posted 03-14-2011 06:23 AM

I was hoping you would get here Bob :-)

-- I started off with nothing I have most of it left

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Nomad62

726 posts in 2425 days


#8 posted 03-14-2011 06:17 PM

I searched “hobart electric motor” and found that Hobart is still around, and making a lot of products including motors such as yours. While the newer motor may not be the same as the one you have the electricity that they use is. If Hobart themselves cannot get you a diagram I would recommend going to an industrial motor repair center and seeing if they can; there were plenty of them on the search result as well. As you no doubt know 220v has no issue at all with creating fires, it would be best to not guess. As a fan of old stuff I wish you the best of luck on this endeavor.

-- Power tools put us ahead of the monkeys

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