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Forum topic by poopiekat posted 03-14-2011 02:00 AM 3766 views 1 time favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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poopiekat

3748 posts in 2489 days


03-14-2011 02:00 AM

I’m just getting my feet wet on a segmented bowl project. This will be a simple fruit compote, though you’d expect to see a real one in glass, I’m following the traditional depression-glass form for this project. To be added will be a footed column of some sort, for an overall height of maybe 12 inches. Anyway, here’s the problem! I’ve encountered a slight gap when constructing the rings, each layer has 24 pieces and there must be a pile-up of minute angular errors. As you can see in picture 1, there is a gap of about 3/32” when the segments are assembled, at the bottom of the pic. Photobucket Here’s what I did: I assembled the rings into semi-circles into a simple angle-aluminum jig, as seen in this picture: Photobucket
Then, I edge-sanded the semi-circles on my belt sander, so that the segments at either end of the semi-circles became absolutely co-planar. Pic: Photobucket Knowing that the mating edges would exactly be in alignment, I could then assemble the 2 half-circles together with a minimal glue line. Once dried and face-sanded, they’ll be ready to layer onto the bowl body as seen on the lathe here: Photobucket This step has solved the problem of mis-matching glue lines and improper gaps in ring glue-ups. By this method, you’re guaranteed two mating 180 degree surfaces for a perfectly fitting joints all around.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!


13 replies so far

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poopiekat

3748 posts in 2489 days


#1 posted 03-14-2011 02:14 AM

Opps! I almost forgot… here’s a pic of all 24 segments glued together, with all glue lines looking pretty tight: Photobucket This will be the flared rim once glued to the bowl and turned. Wish me luck!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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brianinpa

1810 posts in 2478 days


#2 posted 03-14-2011 02:23 AM

That should work just fine, now if only I had a belt sander that big!

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

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poopiekat

3748 posts in 2489 days


#3 posted 03-14-2011 02:32 AM

Thanks, algale!! to brianinpa: A 6” X 48” bench belt sander would do the trick. You could edge-up a 20” diameter ring with one, it oughta be plenty! The sander you see is my home-made edge-sander made from an old conveyor, with a stainless steel platen, and uses a standard Delta 6” X 89” belt. Wayyyyyy back I think I posted a how-to on this. Oh, and as a bonus, that hunk of 6061 aluminum plate I picked up for use as a jig, the glue doesn’t ever stick to it, so once dry your project glue-up will lift right off. I’m wondering if big chute board, with a #7 or #8, might accomplish the same thing?? I actually wondered if a 15-degree chute board might have been the right way to size up the segments in the first place!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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Dandog

250 posts in 1529 days


#4 posted 03-14-2011 03:15 AM

That’s the only way I have found to do it. You still have to be right on with your angled cuts. Or you’ll end up with one or more of the segments looking a little smaller than the others.The smaller the segments the more you can tell. 24 segment’s is ambitious.I’m @ 12 .Then I think I’ll go to 10 degrees. that’s a nice huge belt sander Good job Poopiekat.

-- life an woodworking is one big experiment

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poopiekat

3748 posts in 2489 days


#5 posted 03-14-2011 03:28 AM

Thanks, Dandog! I’m sure that others long before me can take any credit where credit is due for this technique. I just hadn’t seen it ever mentioned here in Lumberjocks before. You-tube is full of videos of people doing perfect glue-ups without dealing with a gap issue, and I just wasn’t getting there, very frustrating! Seems like the tiniest speck will throw off the whole works. I gotta confess, too that although there are 24 pieces in my rings, only 12 are bevel cut @ 15 degrees. The maple pieces are simple rectangles, fitted to achieve the net yield of 11” diameter. Thanks again for your kind words, Dandog!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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brianinpa

1810 posts in 2478 days


#6 posted 03-15-2011 02:35 AM

Poopie I thought your sander looked like a conveyer. Nice idea with that also.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

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poopiekat

3748 posts in 2489 days


#7 posted 03-15-2011 11:56 PM

Thanks, brianinpa! I probably should get a blog going on this project.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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bubinga

861 posts in 1422 days


#8 posted 04-07-2011 06:36 PM

Good tip, as I am planing ,some segmented columns

-- E J ------- Always Keep a Firm Grip on Your Tool

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poopiekat

3748 posts in 2489 days


#9 posted 04-07-2011 07:29 PM

The end result: Photobucket
Bubinga: Thanks for the kind words! I’ll swear by the stationary belt-sander approach for dead-tight joints. Good luck with your columns!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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clubzot10

19 posts in 1366 days


#10 posted 08-05-2011 05:24 PM

nice bowl,
I will also try to use this glueing methode.

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KnickKnack

995 posts in 2321 days


#11 posted 07-19-2012 10:21 AM

I’ve used this technique a goodly number of times since I read it 493 days ago, including this morning to make a boxelette with 45° angles fit together, so I thought it was about time I said ”thanks” to Mr Kat for posting it.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

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poopiekat

3748 posts in 2489 days


#12 posted 07-19-2012 11:30 PM

Thanks, KnickKnack! I appreciate the time you took to say thanks and how you were able to implement it into a 45-degree mitering project! You made my day! I used to put a lot of this stuff out there, just to see if it is of any value to others. I have benefitted greatly from the techniques I’ve learned here too, but durn it, I developed a hand plane addiction in the process, so ya never know!! Thanks again, KK!

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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recipio

2 posts in 119 days


#13 posted 09-05-2014 03:04 PM

Just browsing an old post. I’ve been turning segmented bowls for a while and have concluded that that standard yellow glue has some thickness and throws accuracy out the window. All segmented turnings need assembly in two halves to allow sanding the ends of the ‘semicircles’ – it can be done on a disc sander also.
I’ve switched to a mitre bond glue which gives an almost invisible glue line and just a light touch on the sander.
Assembly of the rings, one on top of the other should of course be done with standard yellow/white glue.

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