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Refurbishing an old Rockwell/Delta Standing Disc and Beltsander

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Forum topic by Mike Vettori posted 12-23-2017 10:59 PM 1715 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mike Vettori

49 posts in 3719 days


12-23-2017 10:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: sander question refurbishing

It’s been a while since I posted anything here, so I hope this is in the correct forum. I recently acquired an old Rockwell Delta Standing 12” Disc Sander and 6×48 Belt Sander. It’s quite a mess with rust, etc. and needs a bit of work, but before I get too far into it I want to make sure the motor still works.

Simple you might say, just plug it in and see what happens. However, the unit came with two separate motors. The one wired into the unit is a 220v motor and I do not have 220 service in my shop to try it out. In the cabinet of the unit was a second, albeit older motor that appears to be a 110v 1.5 HP motor (if someone can tell me how I can post pictures of the motor’s label and the internal wiring)

Here’s my dilemma…I’d like to wire the 110V motor up and see if it turns when given power, but the unit doesn’t have any wires (power source) connected. I’m not an electrician by any means, but I know enough to be dangerous…if I remove one of the plates on the motor, there are terminals to connect power, but I don’t see anywhere for a ground connection. I can wire it and give it a go, but not being an electrician I’m concerned that I might be doing something stupid.

If anyone on this forum is familiar with electrical motors, or has done something similar, any insight you can give would be much appreciated.

Thanks,
Mike


12 replies so far

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Mike Vettori

49 posts in 3719 days


#1 posted 12-23-2017 11:00 PM

Here are images of the motor’s label and internal wiring.

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Mike Vettori

49 posts in 3719 days


#2 posted 12-23-2017 11:04 PM

from the second picture, you can see terminals where I can connect a power source. It looks as though I can reverse the direction of the motor’s rotation if I simply switch the wires on the terminals.
For a power cord, I cut a piece of heavy duty extension cord to hook up, but you can see in the picture that there is no green terminal for the ground wire.

Mike

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MrUnix

6766 posts in 2224 days


#3 posted 12-23-2017 11:28 PM

Most motors do not usually have a ground wire, but they are easy to add – just secure it to the metal housing somewhere. That screw in the bottom left of the opening looks like a good candidate.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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John Smith

999 posts in 187 days


#4 posted 12-23-2017 11:39 PM


if you can find one in some of your old outlets, the green screw
would be appropriate for the grounding screw. (or paint the existing one green).
(not that you would be inspected or anything, just saying that would be the correct one).

,

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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Mike Vettori

49 posts in 3719 days


#5 posted 12-23-2017 11:49 PM

Thanks John and Mr Unix…I thought that might be the ground but wasn’t sure. I’ll connect it up tomorrow and give it a try.

Would it be ok to apply the bare wire to the terminal and secure it with a nut (as the white wire looks to be doing) , or would I need something to connect the bare wire to the terminal (similar to what the red and black wires have).

Thanks,
Mike

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MrUnix

6766 posts in 2224 days


#6 posted 12-24-2017 12:04 AM

As long as it makes connection, it don’t matter. You could always put a washer or two on there just to make it more secure if you feel the need. Of course, it you happen to have the crimp connectors handy, run with it. Any way you do it, there should be some kind of strain relief on the inbound cord so there won’t be any pulling on the connections.

What is the other motor? Might be easier to just re-wire it for 120v, particularly if it’s original to the machine… sure would be a lot easier than trying to swap it out.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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John Smith

999 posts in 187 days


#7 posted 12-24-2017 01:05 AM

Brad said: Might be easier to just re-wire it for 120v, particularly if it’s original to the machine…
sure would be a lot easier than trying to swap it out.

DUH – the simplest things always seem to escape me. (and I have wired two new motors within the last month).

look at the wiring diagram on the label of your motor.

Let us know how it turns out for you !!

.

.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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MrUnix

6766 posts in 2224 days


#8 posted 12-24-2017 01:33 AM

look at the wiring diagram on the label of your motor.
- John Smith

Wrong motor… I was asking about the one that is already installed. If it’s dual voltage like the extra motor shown, then it’s a no brainer. If…

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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John Smith

999 posts in 187 days


#9 posted 12-24-2017 01:46 AM

me too Brad – since he said he got two motors with the machine.
I was thinking they were identical (dual voltage).

we’ll have to wait n see

I have used a lot of step-down transformers for appliances while stationed overseas.
I don’t know how big a transformer would have to be to carry the load of 20 amps
for a motor of that size.

-- Graduated Valedictorian from the University of HardKnocks --

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Mike Vettori

49 posts in 3719 days


#10 posted 12-24-2017 05:12 AM

Sorry, I should have been clearer. The two motors I got with the unit were different. The pictures I posted were of the 110v motor, not the the 220v one. I’ll try it out in the morning and cross my fingers that I don’t burn the house down. I’ll let you know how it turns out.

Mike

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Mike Vettori

49 posts in 3719 days


#11 posted 12-24-2017 03:54 PM

Just connected the wires and gave it a shot…no luck. When I plugged it in it just made a loud buzzing noise but the motor never turned. I switched the black and white wires but had the same outcome. If I spin the motor by and, it turns rather easily, but maybe the motor is just bad.

Mike

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MrUnix

6766 posts in 2224 days


#12 posted 12-24-2017 04:00 PM

Try spinning the motor by hand and then plugging it in (while it’s still spinning). If it runs, then it’s your start circuit (capacitor, centrifugal switch, etc…).

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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