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Forum topic by NewfieDan posted 03-11-2011 02:32 PM 4464 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NewfieDan

50 posts in 2113 days


03-11-2011 02:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

My brother in law has a wood lathe he wants to get rid of. It is an older model (not sure which). It looks like a 20year old Delta. It’s hard to tell since it is buried in the back of his garage, and I can only see the back of it. It comes with a set of 8 Freud tools and a copier(?).

I have the option to try it first then buy…

I have never used a wood lathe before. What should I look out for?


14 replies so far

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helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#1 posted 03-11-2011 02:51 PM

I would say that what you should look for closely depends on how much he wants for it. BTW, welcome to Lumberjocks.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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NewfieDan

50 posts in 2113 days


#2 posted 03-11-2011 03:08 PM

The lathe seems to be in great condition. No rust anywhere (the original owner lives close to the ocean). Belt looks almost like new. My brother in law wants 1000CDN but would let me have for 500CDN.

View BTKS's profile

BTKS

1984 posts in 2928 days


#3 posted 03-11-2011 03:35 PM

Check that the tail stock center and the drive head center are aligned with each other. If the motor runs and the speed changes and it’s an older Delta it should be worth every bit of $500.00. Is the speed control belt and pulley or mechanical variable? The ones with mechanical speed control, I mean turn a handle and the speed changes or twist a knob, are usually worth more. The more mass the better.
I don’t do a lot of turning but when I do I love it. This isn’t much information.
Good luck, hope this helps.

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

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NewfieDan

50 posts in 2113 days


#4 posted 03-11-2011 03:55 PM

It is a stepped pulley for speed control. It looks to be 4 or 5 step pulley. I didn’t get a real good look. I am also concerned about the chuck. The one that’s on it just looks odd to me. It doesn’t have jaws. It looks like it has 4 non-adjustable “hooks” like it should be used for turning bowls or something(just a guess) since it can’t be opened or closed.

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helluvawreck

23175 posts in 2331 days


#5 posted 03-11-2011 07:16 PM

Much of the time lathes come with just the centers so a chuck is a nice extra. At least that’s the way it used to be anyways. Another nice thing would be whether it has indexing holes place on the pulley or spindle somewhere so that you can lock the spindle at certain increments of 360 dgrees for cutting flutes, ect.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Loren's profile

Loren

8305 posts in 3112 days


#6 posted 03-11-2011 07:26 PM

Wood lathes are not complicated machines and they hold up for a long
time.

I had a lower-end Delta from the 1970s at one time and it really was
not a very good tool. The fit and finish of critical parts were poor.

Delta did and does make some good machinery, but the particular lathe
I had was unimpressive.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4454 posts in 3425 days


#7 posted 03-12-2011 12:44 AM

If you can get some pics, we could better give you an idea of value. What size motor, bed length, etc.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

View NewfieDan's profile

NewfieDan

50 posts in 2113 days


#8 posted 03-14-2011 02:14 PM

There are pics of the newest toy in the shop in my workshop page. As you can see it is an older lathe. The “chuck” doesn’t seem right to me. I’m thinking I may need to put a different one on.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4541 posts in 2539 days


#9 posted 03-14-2011 02:53 PM

I always tell people that it is essential to have sharp cutting tools when working with a lathe. You need to sharpen often. Don’t consider a lathe if you do not have a good way to sharpen.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

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NewfieDan

50 posts in 2113 days


#10 posted 03-14-2011 03:12 PM

Rich: Sharpening isn’t too much of a concern. I all the required tools for sharpening. I am not familiar with the use of the lathe itself and the odd looking chuck that is on it. Being as it is an older model there is no manual with it. I am curious if i can get a replacement chuck to update its use.

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richgreer

4541 posts in 2539 days


#11 posted 03-14-2011 04:27 PM

The key question is what size arbor does the lathe have. There are several common sizes. Perhaps the most common is 1” diameter with 8 t.p.i. (threads per inch). If the arbor has a common size, getting a replacement chuck will not be a problem.

Note that the arbor size also determines if you can get faceplates to fit. In my opinion, faceplates are an under appreciated lathe accessory. Sometimes they work better than a chuck.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

4454 posts in 3425 days


#12 posted 03-14-2011 05:19 PM

Looked at the workshop shots. The lathe has a spur center on the headstock. That center is most often used in spindle turning. Take it off and measure the shaft and threads (if there are threads on it) to determine the chuck size, face plate, etc.
Bill

-- bill@magraphics.us

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NewfieDan

50 posts in 2113 days


#13 posted 03-14-2011 05:52 PM

The arbor for the chuck is 7/8 with 14TPI. Just checked it with calipers and thread pitch gauge.

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BTKS

1984 posts in 2928 days


#14 posted 03-15-2011 02:14 AM

The center isn’t what I would call a chuck. I consider it a drive center. It may be threaded on and you can use the hole in the shaft to lock the shaft and turn it off the shaft. Or it may be a Morse taper and you remove it by tapping a rod down the middle of the shaft and knock it out with a light tap or three.
This style of drive center is used for spindle turning. It looks like a good live center on the tail stock. Overall it looks like a well built sound machine. The threads on the outboard side of the shaft should be left threaded to turn face plates, etc on the outside of the machine that won’t swing over the bed.
Hope this helps. BTKS

-- "Man's ingenuity has outrun his intelligence" (Joseph Wood Krutch)

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